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CompTIA A+ Guide to Managing & Maintaining Your PC By: JEAN ANDREW Computer Maintenance Chapter 9: Installing & supporting I/O devices.

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Presentation on theme: "CompTIA A+ Guide to Managing & Maintaining Your PC By: JEAN ANDREW Computer Maintenance Chapter 9: Installing & supporting I/O devices."— Presentation transcript:

1 CompTIA A+ Guide to Managing & Maintaining Your PC By: JEAN ANDREW Computer Maintenance Chapter 9: Installing & supporting I/O devices

2 Copyright © CIST 2 Objectives After you have completed this lesson, you will be able to: Identify name, purpose, and characteristic of input/output devices Describe about monitors and video cards and how they relate to the system. Identify the general approaches you need to take when installing and supporting I/O devices Identify name, purpose, and characteristic of ports and expansion slots for add-on devices. Install and support I/O devices. Identify diagnostic procedures and troubleshooting techniques to troubleshoot I/O devices, including keyboards pointing devices, and video.

3 Copyright © CIST 3 Scenario In this chapter, you will learn: Basic principle to support I/O devices Working with keyboard The mouse and other pointing devices Specialty input devices Monitor, projectors, and video cards Using ports and expansion slots for add-on devices Troubleshooting I/O devices

4 Basic Principle To Support I/O Devices Consider these basic concepts used when supporting I/O devices: Every I/O device is controlled by software When it come to installing or supporting a device, the manufacturer knows best. Some devices need application software to use the device. Problems with a device can sometimes be solve by updating the device drivers. Learning about I/O devices is a moving target. Copyright © CIST 4

5 5 Scenario In this chapter, you will learn: Basic principle to support I/O devices Working with keyboard The mouse and other pointing devices Specialty input devices Monitor, projectors, and video cards Using ports and expansion slots for add-on devices Troubleshooting I/O devices

6 Working With Keyboards Ergonomic means designed fro safe and comfortable interaction between human beings and machines. A danger from using keyboard too much is repetitive stress injury (RSI) known as carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) Figure 9-1 Copyright © CIST 6

7 Working With Keyboards HOW KEYBOARD KEYS WORK Keyboard use one of two common technologies in the way the keys make contact: Foil contact Metal contact KEYBOARD CONNECTORS Keyboards connect to a PC by one of four methods: –DIN connector (outdated) –PS/2 connector (sometimes called mini-DIN) –USB port –Wireless connection Copyright © CIST 7

8 Working With Keyboards INSTALLING HOW KEYBOARD Because the system BIOS manage the keyboard, no keyboard drive are necessary. Exception for the wireless keyboard CLEANING THE KEYBOARD Mouse and keyboard need to be regularly cleaned to keep them working well You can use damp cloth to clean the keyboard surface You can also turn the keyboard upside down and bump multiple keys wit flat palm Use a can of compressed air to blow dust and debris Copyright © CIST 8

9 9 Scenario In this chapter, you will learn: Basic principle to support I/O devices Working with keyboard The mouse and other pointing devices Specialty input devices Monitor, projectors, and video cards Using ports and expansion slots for add-on devices Troubleshooting I/O devices

10 The Mouse And Other Pointing Devices A pointing device allows you to move a pointer on the screen and perform tasks such as executing (clicking) a command button. Copyright © CIST 10

11 The Mouse And Other Pointing Devices MOUSE TECHNOLOGIES Mouse technologies include the wheel moue and the optical mouse. Copyright © CIST 11

12 The Mouse And Other Pointing Devices A mouse can connect to the computer by several methods: Motherboard mouse or PS/2-compatible mouse By using mouse bus card that provide a PS/2 mouse port (bus mouse) By using the serial mouse (serial mouse) By using USB port By using a Y-connection with the keyboard By using a cordless technology whereby the mouse send signals to a sensor on the PC Copyright © CIST 12

13 The Mouse And Other Pointing Devices TOUCH SCREENS A touch screen is an input device that use a monitor or LCD panel as the backdrop for input options. OTHER POINTING DEVICES Trackballs and touch pads Copyright © CIST 13 ManufacturerWeb Site BioStikwww.biostik.com Mitsumiwww.mitsumi.com Logitechwww.logitech.com Microsoftwww.microsoft.com Intelwww.intel.com Belkinwww.belkin.com Keytec, Inc.www.magictouch.com

14 Copyright © CIST 14 Scenario In this chapter, you will learn: Basic principle to support I/O devices Working with keyboard The mouse and other pointing devices Specialty input devices Monitor, projectors, and video cards Using ports and expansion slots for add-on devices Troubleshooting I/O devices

15 Specialty Input Devices BARCODE READERS FINGERPRINT READERS AND OTHER BIOMETRIC DEVICES Copyright © CIST 15

16 Copyright © CIST 16 Scenario In this chapter, you will learn: Basic principle to support I/O devices Working with keyboard The mouse and other pointing devices Specialty input devices Monitor, projectors, and video cards Using ports and expansion slots for add-on devices Troubleshooting I/O devices

17 Monitors CRT monitor (takes up a lot of desk space and costs less) LCD Monitor (frees your desk space, looks cool, and cost more) HOW A CRT MONITOR WORKS Copyright © CIST 17

18 How A LCD Monitor Works TFT (thin film transistor) display or active matrix display DSTN (dual-scan twisted nematic) display or passive matrix display Copyright © CIST 18

19 Choosing Between A CRT Monitor And An LCD Monitor Copyright © CIST 19

20 Choosing Between A CRT Monitor And An LCD Monitor Copyright © CIST 20

21 Choosing Between A CRT Monitor And An LCD Monitor Copyright © CIST 21

22 Monitors, Projectors, And Video Cards The different resolution standards are as follows: VGA (Video Graphics Array) support up to 640x280 SVGA (Supper VGA) support up to 800x600 XGA (eXtended Graphic Array) support up to 1024 x 768 SXGA (Super XGA) support up to 1280x 1024 SXGA + is a variation of SXGA and uses a resolution of 1400 x 1050 WSXGA + (Wide SXGA +) use a resolution of 1680 x 1050 UXGA (Ultra XGA) supports up to 1600 x 1200 WUXGA (Wide UXGA) supports up to 1920 x 1200 APPLY CONCEPT: INSTALLING DUAL MONITOR Copyright © CIST 22

23 Using A Projector Copyright © CIST 23

24 Video Cards The fives of data transfer are as follow: RGB video using a VGA port: use a regular 15-pin VGA port DVI (Digital Visual Interface): for video card that only has a DVI port Composite video: use with Composite Out port to send output to a TV, have only one pin at the central of the port S-Video (Super-Video): use by some high-end TVs and video equipment, 4 pins round port HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is currently used on television and other home theatre equipment. Copyright © CIST 24

25 Video Cards Copyright © CIST 25

26 The Bus Used By Video Cards Four buses have been used for video cards in the past 20 years or so. They are VESA bus, The regular PCI bus, The AGP bus, and The newer PCI Express bus. Copyright © CIST 26

27 Different AGP Standards Copyright © CIST 27

28 Different AGP Standards Copyright © CIST 28

29 PCI Express Copyright © CIST 29

30 Graphics Accelerators A graphic accelerator is a type of video card that has its own processor to boost performance. Copyright © CIST 30 Notes: One problem high-end graphics cards have is overheating. One possible solution is a PCI fan card mounted next to the graphics card.

31 Video Memory The following list describes the different types of video memory: – VRAM (video RAM) – SGRAM (synchronous graphics RAM) – WRAM (window RAM) – MultiBank DRAM (MDRAM) – 3-D RAM – Direct RDRAM (DRDRAM) – Graphics DDR, Graphics DDR2 (GDDR2), and Graphics DDR3 (GDDR3) Copyright © CIST 31

32 Installing A Video Card 1. Check your motherboard documentation 2. Remove case cover and insert card in the slot and slide the retention mechanism 3. Replace the computer case cover, plug the video cable, and turn on the system, Windows will launch the Found New Hardware Wizard 4. Right-click anywhere on the desktop > Properties 5. Select Settings tab > click Advanced > click Adapter tab 6. Insert the CD came with the video card and click Updates Drivers and follow the onscreen direction. 7. After the drivers are installed, use Display Properties window to check the resolution and refresh rate for monitor. Copyright © CIST 32 Manufacturer WebsiteManufacturerWeb Site ASUSTek Computer, Inc. Technologies, Inc.www.ati.com Creative Technology, Ltd. Co., Ltd.www.gainward.com Hercules Computer Tec. Graphics, Inc.www.matrox.com MSI Computer Corporation VisionTek

33 Copyright © CIST 33 Scenario In this chapter, you will learn: Basic principle to support I/O devices Working with keyboard The mouse and other pointing devices Specialty input devices Monitor, projectors, and video cards Using ports and expansion slots for add-on devices Troubleshooting I/O devices

34 Using Ports And Expansion Slots For Add-on Devices Copyright © CIST 34

35 Using Ports And Expansion Slots For Add-on Devices Copyright © CIST 35

36 Using Serial Ports and Parallel Ports RS-232c (Reference Standard 232 revision c) SPP (Standard Parallel Port) EPP (Enhanced Parallel Port) ECP (Extended Parallel Port) Figure 9-35 Copyright © CIST 36

37 Infrared Transceivers An infrared transceiver, also called IrDA (Infrared Data Association) transceiver or an IR transceiver Version of USB –USB Version 1.1: 1.5 Mbps and 12 Mbps –USB Version 2.0: 480 Mbps Copyright © CIST 37

38 Using USB Ports USB allows for hot-swapping and hot-pluggable devices. USB host controller Copyright © CIST 38

39 Using IEEE 1394 Ports IEEE 1394 as also called FireWire and i.Link FireWire use serial transmission, support speed up to 3.2 Gbps Use with digital camcorders, DVDs, and hard drives One host controller support up to 63 FireWire devices Two standards for IEEE 1394 are 1394a and 1394b 1394a supports speeds up to 400 Mbps, 4.5 meters (15 feet) 1394a supports two types of connectors and cables: Copyright © CIST 39

40 Using IEEE 1394 Ports Copyright © CIST 40

41 Installing And Supporting Expansion Cards SELECTING PCI CARDS Copyright © CIST 41

42 APPLY CONCEPT: Mr. Bill was hurriedly setting up a computer for a friend. When he got the modem, he installed it as he had installed many modems in the past. He put the modem card in the PCI slot and turned on the PC. When the found new hardware Wizard launched, he installed the drivers, but it wouldnt work. After four hours, then it hit him to read the instruction. He open the booklet and it say The modem WILL NOT WORK if you install the card first and the software second Installing And Supporting Expansion Cards INSTALLING AND CONFIGURING A PCI MODEM CARD A modem is a device used by a PC to communicate over a phone line. A modem can be an external device connected by a USB or serial port, a modem card Using either PCI or PCI Express slot, or a smaller and less expensive modem riser card. Or can be on-board component. On a notebook, a modem is embedded component on the motherboard or in a PC Card installed in a PC card slot. A modem provide one or two RJ-11 (registered jack 11), The most common speed is 56 Kbps Copyright © CIST 42

43 Installing And Supporting Expansion Cards Copyright © CIST 43 Follow these steps to install a modem card: Read the documentation If you installing the modem card to replace an onboard modem port, enter CMOS setup and disable the onboard modem card. Protect PC from ESD Power down the PC and unplug it. Open computer case, remove face plate. Insert the card in the expansion card properly Insert the screw that connects the card to the case Replace the case cover, power cord, and other peripheral. Plug the telephone line from the house into the jack on the modem

44 Installing And Supporting Expansion Cards Copyright © CIST 44 Turn on your computer and follow these steps to configure modem: Log in as a user account that has administrative privileges You might have to boot twice: once to allow Plug and Play to detect firmware on the modem card that run the modem. In most case, Windows XP installs a modem card without giving you the opportunity to use the modem manufacturer drivers. Open Device Manager > Properties >Driver > Update Driver > No not at this time > Next Insert the CD, select Installed from a list or specific location (advanced) and click Next Select Search for the best driver in these locations. Click Browse > click OK and click Next > click Finish. After install drivers, verify that the OS configured the modem correctly, open Device manager and modem Properties Right-click on My network place > Properties > Create a new connection > Connect to the Internet

45 Copyright © CIST 45 Scenario In this chapter, you will learn: Basic principle to support I/O devices Working with keyboard The mouse and other pointing devices Specialty input devices Monitor, projectors, and video cards Using ports and expansion slots for add-on devices Troubleshooting I/O devices

46 Troubleshooting I/O Devices Generally, when troubleshooting an I/O devices, follow these steps: For new installation, suspect the drivers are not installed correctly, plug in or set in the expansion slot correctly For problems after an installation, ask the user what has just changed in the system Analyze the situation and try to isolate the problem. Check simple things first Try using Device Manager to uninstall the device. Then reboot and installs the drivers again Exchange the device for a known good once or install the suspect device in a working system After problems is fixed, document the symptoms, source of the problem, and the solutions. Copyright © CIST 46

47 Troubleshooting Keyboards A FEW KEYS DONT WORK THE KEYBOARDS DOES NOT WORK AT ALL KEY CONTINUES TO REPEAT AFTER BEING RELEASED KEYS PRODUCE THE WRONG CHARACTERS MAJOR SPILL ON THE KEYBOARD Copyright © CIST 47

48 Troubleshooting a Touch Screen Check the touch screen cable is connected to the PC and Device Manager recognizes the device with no errors Examine the screen fro excessive scratches Examine the edges of the touch screen for crumbs If the touch screen is not accurate, see the documentation Try uninstalling and reinstalling the touch screen under Windows Copyright © CIST 48

49 Troubleshooting A Mouse Or Touchpad Check the mouse port connection Check the dust or dirt inside the mouse. Reboot the PC. Update driver Try a new mouse Uninstall and reboot then reinstall the mouse driver. Reboot the PC Reboot the PC and select the logged option from the startup menu to create the Ntbtlog.txt file. Continue to boot and check the log for errors. For notebook touchpad, check the CMOS setup to see if the touch pad was set to disabled. Copyright © CIST 49

50 Troubleshooting Monitors And Video Cards POWER LIGHT (LED) DOES NOT GO ON; NO PICTURE POWER LED IS ON, NO PICTURE ON POWER-UP POWER IS ON, BUT MONITOR DISPLAYS THE WRONG CHARACTERS MONITOR FLICKERS, HAS WAVY LINES, OR BOTH NO GRAPHICS DISPLAY OR THE SCREEN GOES BLANK WHEN LOADING CERTAIN PROGRAMS SCREEN GOES BLANK 30 MINUTES OR ONE MINUTE AFTER THE KEYBOARD IS LEFT UNTOUCHED POOR COLOR DISPLAY PICTURE OUT OF FOCUS OR OUT OF ADJUSTMENT CRAKLING SOUND DISPLAY SETTINGS MAKE THE SCREEN UNREACHABLE Copyright © CIST 50 Caution: a monitor retains a charge even after the power cord is unplugged. If you are trained to open a monitor case to replace a fuse, unplug the monitor and wait at least 60 minutes before opening the case so that capacitors have completely discharge.

51 Vocabulary 3-D RAMhot-pluggablepassive matrix display active matrix displayhot-swappingpixel bus mousehubPS/2-compatible mouse chip creepi.Linkrefresh rate DCE, DTEI/O controller cardresolution Direct RDRAM (DRDRAM)IEEE 1384serial mouse dot pitchIEEE 1394SGRAM DSTNinfrared transceiverTFT (Thin film transistor) FireWireinterlacedtouch screen ECP, EPPisochronous data transferUART flat panel monitorLCD monitorUSB host controller graphic acceleratormotherboard mouseVRRAM (video RAM) Graphics DDR (G-DDR)MultiBank DRAM (MDRAM)WRAM (window RAM) Graphics DDR2 (G-DDR2)noninterlacednull modem cable Copyright © CIST 51

52 Copyright © CIST 52 Summary Adding new devices to a computer requires installing hardware and software. Even if you know how to generally install an I/O device, always follow the specific instructions of the product manufacturer. Use Device Manager under Windows to determine what resources currently installed devices use. A keyboard can use a DIN, PS/2, USB, or wireless connection. Biometric input devices, such as a fingerprint reader or iris scanner, collect biological data and compare it to that recorded about the person to authenticate the persons access to a system. Features to consider when purchasing a monitor are the screen size, refresh rate, interlacing, response time, dot pitch or pixel pitch, resolution, multiscan ability, color quality, contrast ratio, viewing angle, display type (active or passive matrix), backlighting, and type of connector (analog or digital) used by the monitor. A video card is rated by the bus that it used and the amount of video RAM on the card. Both features affect the overall speed and performance of the card. Some types of video memory are VRAM, SGRAM, WRAM, 3-D RAM, MDRAM, G-DDR, G-DDR2, G-DDR3, and DRDRAM.

53 Copyright © CIST 53 Summary Most computers provide one or more USB ports, one parallel port, and perhaps an IEEE 1394 port or serial port to be used for a variety of devices. The PCI bus is presently the most popular local bus. The VESA local bus is an outdated standard designed by the Video Electronics Standards Association of video cards, the VESA bus was replaced by PCI, which as then replaced by the AGP bus, and more recently by the PCI Express bus. Generally, expansion cards used PCI Express or PCI slots. UART logic on a motherboard chipset controls serial ports. Because data might become corrupted, parallel cables should be not exceed 15 feet (4.5 meters) in length. HP recommends that the cable not exceed 10 feet (3 meters). Three types of parallel ports are standard, EPP, and ECP. The ECP type use a DMA channel. Serial ports are sometimes configured as COM1, COM2, COM3, or COM4, and parallel ports can be configured as LPT1, LPT2, or LPT3. The USB and IEEE 1394 bus only used one set of system resources for all devices connected to it, and USB devices are hot-pluggable.

54 Copyright © CIST 54 Quizzes 1. Among the following, what are the input devices? a. Keyboardc. Monitor b. Moused. Processor 2. Which one can support the fastest speed? a. USB c. Serial b. FireWired. Parallel 3. How many pins of the mini-DIN or PS/2 port? a. 2c. 4 b. 3d. 5

55 Copyright © CIST 55 Question Questions? Delivery guide for instructor. Guide to managing and maintaining your PC – sixth edition Video chapter 9/Using Dual monitors Video chapter 9/Installing a video card Video chapter 9/FireWire ports Video chapter 9/Disabling Onboard Ports and now its time to practice


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