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Monroe County Historic Preservation Board December 13, 2010.

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Presentation on theme: "Monroe County Historic Preservation Board December 13, 2010."— Presentation transcript:

1 Monroe County Historic Preservation Board December 13, 2010

2 Monroe County Historic Preservation Board of Review Agenda – Regular Meeting Monroe County Courthouse, Meeting Room December 13, 2010 – 5:30 p.m. CALL TO ORDER ROLL CALL APPROVAL OF AGENDA APPROVAL OF MINUTES Approval of October 18, 2010 Meeting Minutes Approval of October 18, 2010 Meeting Minutes OLD BUSINESS NEW BUSINESS 1011-REZ-05: Historic Preservation Board of Review, Rezone to add Historic 1011-REZ-05: Historic Preservation Board of Review, Rezone to add Historic Preservation Overlay District Zoning to Breezy Point Farm. One lot on 13 acres, Located in Bean Blossom Twp., Section 32, at 8000 W. Sand College Road. Zoned AG/RR. National Trust for Historic Preservation 2011 Most Endangered Historic Places List Applications National Trust for Historic Preservation 2011 Most Endangered Historic Places List Applications Member Outreach Efforts Member Outreach Efforts

3 1011-REZ-05: Historic Preservation Board of Review, Rezone to add Historic Preservation Overlay District Zoning to Breezy Point Farm. One lot on 13 acres, Located in Bean Blossom Twp., Section 32, at 8000 W. Sand College Road. Zoned AG/RR.

4 Breezy Point Farm: Location & Aerial Photo

5 Breezy Point Farm: Local Historic Significance Van Buskirk family - early settlers of Monroe County Revolutionary Isaac Van Buskirk settled here in 1809 Isacc’s grandson Captain David Van Buskirk was involved with county politics; he was a leader of the Company F 27 th infantry during the Civil War; and at 300 lbs / 6’ 10” tall was also known as the biggest man in the Union Army David Van Buskirk is Patricia Powell’s great grandfather (her grandmother’s father)

6 Breezy Point Farm: Farmhouse 1989 Monroe County Interim Report identifies the house on Breezy Point Farm as the John Ridge House (10010) Traditional I-house form with a Gothic Revival center front gable Built in 1882 by Bud Rogers for John Turner Ridge and Cynthia Van Buskirk Ridge (the petitioner’s grandparents) for $ The Ridges’ created the name for the property, Breezy Point Farm

7 Breezy Point Farm: Farmhouse Looking at east side of house

8 Breezy Point Farm: Farmhouse Looking at west side of house

9 Breezy Point Farm: Farmhouse Looking at rear (north) side of house

10 Breezy Point Farm: Farmhouse - Additions Additions to the home included: a single story dining room and kitchen addition on the rear of the original footprint in 1891; a one level room, used mostly as a bedroom, added around ; and the breakfast nook addition in Room addition, Breakfast nook addition, 1977

11 Breezy Point Farm: Outbuildings – 1 of 7 Barn built in 1898 Barn type: Midwest Portal Rectangular floor plan, gable roof and vertical wood timber siding. Looking north at barn

12 Breezy Point Farm: Outbuildings – 2 of 7 Out house built in 1896 Looking northeast at outhouse

13 Breezy Point Farm: Outbuildings – 3 of 7 Wood shed originally built in 1882, and rebuilt in 1950 Looking southeast at woodshed

14 Breezy Point Farm: Outbuildings – 4 of 7 Bank cellar built in 1887 Looking northeast at bank cellar Looking east at bank cellar

15 Breezy Point Farm: Outbuildings – 5 of 7 Concrete silo built in 1901 Open tool shed also shown, not part of this HP Overlay designation proposal. Looking west at silo

16 Breezy Point Farm: Outbuildings – 6 of 7 Barn built in 1897 Barn type: Midwest Portal Looking south at barn

17 Breezy Point Farm: Outbuildings – 7 of 7 Drive thru corn crib built in Rectangular floor plan with a gable roof. Looking southeast at crib

18 Breezy Point Farm: Criteria for Designation To be identified as historic or architecturally worthy, a building, structure or place must possess one or more of the following significant attributes: 1.an association with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of County history; 2.an association with the lives of persons significant in the County's past; 3.the distinctive characteristics of a type, period or method of construction; 4.an example of the work of a master; 5.high artistic values; 6.an example of a significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction; or 7.capability of yielding information important in prehistory or history.

19 The Midwest 3-portal barns have three aisles that extend through the barn, parallel to the roof ridge. Large hay hoods are typical features of the 3-portal barns which are used for hay storage and for feeding livestock. Midwest Three Portal Barn A Midwest 3-Portal Barn Rush County, IN DRAWING BY AUDRA CIURAITE Source: DNR website (www.in.gov/dnr/historic/4253.htm)www.in.gov/dnr/historic/4253.htm

20 When several cribs are joined together under one roof and separated by an aisle, the result is the transverse crib barn. When the same barn form is made of dimension or saw-cut lumber, it is called a transverse frame barn. Transverse Frame Barn Style Source: DNR website (www.in.gov/dnr/historic/4254.htm)www.in.gov/dnr/historic/4254.htm A Transverse Frame Barn Rush County, IN DRAWING BY AUDRA CIURAITE

21 The two-story I-house evolved from the central-passage house with two end chimneys. The addition of a second story reflected the growing prosperity of an agrarian economy. It is little wonder that the I-house is the predominant housing type in rural areas. Geographically, the I-house can be found from the Middle Atlantic region south to Maryland and Virginia and then west. First identified as a distinct building type during the 1930s, the I-house was the most pervasive traditional house type in Indiana, Illinois and Iowa--hence its name. Because its basic form adapted easily to the application of a variety of architectural details, the I-house persisted from the late-eighteenth to the early-twentieth centuries. The I-house is two stories high, one room deep and at least two rooms wide. The facade tends to be symmetrical, with a central entrance in a three- or a five-bay configuration. Building materials included log, wood frame, brick or stone. Placement of chimneys varied according to region. Sometimes they were found at each gable-end flush with the wall, on the house's exterior or paired at the center of the structure. Demands for additional space frequently necessitated the building of ells or wings at the rear of the house as well as porches. Despite the I-house's simplicity of form—or likely because of it—decorative details representing a variety of architectural styles were freely applied, bridging the gap between a rural, folk-derived building type and the academic, architect-designed structures found primarily in the county's urban areas. I - House Source: Designing Place: Architecture as Community Art in Martinsville, Indiana, c/o Morgan County Historic Preservation Society website (http://scican3.scican.net/designing_place/Folk_Vernacular/ihouse.htm)http://scican3.scican.net/designing_place/Folk_Vernacular/ihouse.htm


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