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© Boardworks Ltd 20061 of 12 ‘The Man He Killed’ Pre-1914 Poetry These icons indicate that teacher’s notes or useful web addresses are available in the.

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Presentation on theme: "© Boardworks Ltd 20061 of 12 ‘The Man He Killed’ Pre-1914 Poetry These icons indicate that teacher’s notes or useful web addresses are available in the."— Presentation transcript:

1 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 ‘The Man He Killed’ Pre-1914 Poetry These icons indicate that teacher’s notes or useful web addresses are available in the Notes Page. This icon indicates that the slide contains activities created in Flash. These activities are not editable. For more detailed instructions, see the Getting Started presentation. This icon indicates that a worksheet accompanies this slide. © Boardworks Ltd of 12

2 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 In your exam, you are required to discuss two pre-1914 poems and compare these to the two modern poets you have studied. Before you begin, discuss the questions below in small groups. Do you know any ‘old’ poetry? How many ‘old’ poets can you name? What do you expect pre-1914 poetry to be like? What kind of people do you imagine read these poems? What do you think the point of studying older poetry might be? Can you imagine any comparisons between pre-1914 poetry and the modern poems that you’ve studied? How might they be the same or different? Introducing pre-1914 poems

3 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 ‘The Man He Killed’ Listen to Thomas Hardy’s ‘The Man He Killed’ and then read the poem. What are your first thoughts about the poem? Do you like it? Summarize each stanza of the poem in your own words.

4 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 Glossary a drink placed in opposition foot soldiers enemy enlist – sign up for the armed forces possessions (specifically horse traps) nipperkin ranged infantry foe ‘list traps

5 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 After reading ‘The Man He Killed’

6 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 ‘Had he and I but met By some old ancient inn, We should have sat us down to wet Right many a nipperkin! How is language used here to present the narrator as quite a simple, uncomplicated person? ‘Had he and I but met By some old ancient inn, We should have sat us down to wet Right many a nipperkin! Slang is used to present the narrator as friendly and likable. He seems to enjoy having a good time. How else is this simple but jolly effect created? A simple rhythm (3/3/4/3) and rhyme scheme (ABAB) help us to understand the man’s uneducated good nature. The rhymes aren’t complicated, reflecting the simple honesty of the character. Close analysis of ‘The Man He Killed’ ‘Had he and I but met By some old ancient inn, We should have sat us down to wet Right many a nipperkin!

7 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 ‘But ranged as infantry, And staring face to face, I shot at him as he at me, And killed him in his place. How do we know that the narrator was in a life-or- death situation when he killed the man? ‘But ranged as infantry, And staring face to face, I shot at him as he at me, And killed him in his place. Does this information affect your view of the character and his actions? How? Close analysis of ‘The Man He Killed’

8 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 ‘I shot him dead because – Because he was my foe, Just so: my foe of course he was; That’s clear enough; although Why do you think the narrator pauses and repeats ‘Because’ twice? ‘I shot him dead because – Because he was my foe, Just so: my foe of course he was; That’s clear enough; although Why do you think the narrator then goes on to use the phrases ‘Just so’…’of course’ and ‘that’s clear enough’? Is he trying to convince himself that what he did was right? ‘I shot him dead because – Because he was my foe, Just so: my foe of course he was; That’s clear enough; although Close analysis of ‘The Man He Killed’

9 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 ‘He thought he’d ‘list, perhaps, Off-hand like – just as I – Was out of work – had sold his traps – No other reason why. What do we learn here about why the narrator became a soldier? Close analysis of ‘The Man He Killed’ ‘He thought he’d ‘list, perhaps, Off-hand like – just as I – Was out of work – had sold his traps – No other reason why.

10 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 ‘Yes; quaint and curious war is! You shoot a fellow down You'd treat, if met where any bar is, Or help to half-a-crown.’ Why do you think the poet has written the poem in speech marks? Where do you imagine the poem is being delivered, and to whom? ‘Yes; quaint and curious war is! You shoot a fellow down You'd treat, if met where any bar is, Or help to half-a-crown.’ Close analysis of ‘The Man He Killed’

11 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 Answer the following questions in detail. Use quotations whenever appropriate to prove or illustrate your points. 1.What are your impressions of the narrator of the poem? 2.How do you think he feels about having killed? 3.How does Hardy’s use of rhythm affect the impact of the poem? 4.Hardy wrote ‘The Man He Killed’ in What war do you think the narrator may have been fighting in? 5.What do you think is meant by ‘quaint and curious war is’? Do you agree with this view? 6.Why do you think Hardy wrote the poem? After reading ‘The Man He Killed’

12 © Boardworks Ltd of 12 Poems to compare with ‘The Man He Killed’ Choose another poem to compare with ‘The Man He Killed’. Brainstorm similarities and differences between the two poems. Remember to consider language and structure, as well as meaning.


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