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Presentation on theme: "For more information see: www.pesticides.gov.uk/pesticides_forum_home.asp www.pesticides.gov.uk/pesticides_forum_home.asp Original images and graphics."— Presentation transcript:

1 For more information see: Original images and graphics as PPT

2 For more information see: Notes This presentation is based on some of the graphics and data from the Pesticides Forum Annual Report It provides users with all the information in one easily accessible place. Some graphs may be updated with more recent data as this becomes available during the year. The layout of this year’s report reflects the new UK National Action Plan; although many of the previous indicators remain, they appear in a different order and under new sections. For the full context please see the supporting text in the annual report. The link to the 2012 annual report is:  forum/Focus/pesticides-forum-annual-reports forum/Focus/pesticides-forum-annual-reports

3 For more information see: UK National Action Plan for Pesticides: integrating regulation and non-regulatory approaches James Clarke Chairman

4 For more information see: Presentation content The role of the Pesticides Forum (PF) Thematic strategy (for pesticides) The UK National Action Plan (NAP) – EU context – UK approach Indicators of Sustainable Use – By key heading in NAP Summary and future plans

5 For more information see: Pesticides in the UK Pesticides Forum annual report Impacts and sustainable use PPT of data available

6 For more information see: About the Pesticides Forum Members, objectives and topics covered

7 For more information see: Pesticides Forum Membership Organisations Users, Advisors, Manufacturers, Environment, Consumers ADAS The Organic Sector Advisory Committee on Pesticides (ACP) Agricultural Engineers Association (AEA) Agricultural Industries Confederation (AIC) Agriculture & Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) The Amenity Forum BASIS (Registration) Ltd The Co-operative Farms Country Land & Business Association (CLA) Crop Protection Association (CPA) Environment Agency (EA) Fresh Produce Consortium/British Retail Consortium The Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust (GWCT) Linking the Environment & Farming (LEAF) National Farmers’ Union (NFU) National Farmers’ Union Scotland (NFUS) Pesticide Action Network (PAN-UK) Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) SUSTAIN Unite Voluntary Initiative (VI) Wildlife & Countryside LINK (WCL) Women’s Food & Farming Union (WFU)

8 For more information see: Pesticides Forum Observers Health & Safety Executive (HSE) Department of Agriculture & Rural Development Northern Ireland (DARDNI) Department of Health (DoH) Department for Business, Innovation & Skills (BIS) Food Standards Agency (FSA) Natural England (NE) Scottish Government Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services Division The Welsh Government (WG) Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA)

9 For more information see: Aims and Objectives Aims: To oversee work under the UK National Action PlanUK National Action Plan To monitor the effects of policies, laws and other initiatives that affect or are affected by the use of pesticides, and To offer advice to Ministers and stakeholders To provide a forum for exchanging views, and where possible to allow our stakeholders to come to a general agreement Specific Objectives: Communications Monitoring impacts Knowledge transfer

10 For more information see: Objectives: Communications To promote effective ways of helping all those involved in selling, supplying, storing, using and disposing of pesticides and pesticide waste products to use technologies and techniques which: – limit the need to use these products (and the risks that can arise from using them) in a way which is consistent with sustainable production and the control of pests, weeds and diseases; and – share best practice between all farming systems, whether organic systems using pesticides or other control options To monitor, review and improve the quality and relevance of information available to all those involved in selling, supplying, storing, using and disposing of pesticides and pesticide waste products To prepare and publish an annual report of our activities and maintain a close working relationship with the Advisory Committee on Pesticidesannual reportAdvisory Committee on Pesticides

11 For more information see: Objectives: Impacts and KT Monitoring impacts To consider how to most effectively monitor all impacts arising from the use of pesticides (including using indicators), and communicate these findings to Ministers, our stakeholders and the public Knowledge transfer To monitor pesticide-related research and development and aim to inform funding organisations of any significant gaps in the programme To promote the most effective and practical ways for sharing best practice in technology and research and development, by encouraging discussions between researchers and research funders, and between all those involved in selling, supplying, storing, using and disposing of pesticides

12 For more information see: Key topics covered in 2011/2012 Discussion on the Consultation on the implementation of the Sustainable Use Directive, and workshops on – minimising impacts – best practice and control measures Container Management Group final report, including developments in container design The work of the Expert Committee for Pesticides Residues in Food Impact of reduced availability of pesticides Impacts of EU legislation

13 For more information see: The UK National Action Plan Available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/pesticides-uk-national-action-plan

14 For more information see: Thematic strategy (for PPPs) Disposal/degradation Pre-marketing Use Authorisation regulation 1107/2009/EC Pesticides and Waste law Machinery Directive 2009/127/EC (Amended) Sustainable Use Directive 2009/128/EC Statistics regulation 1185/2009/EC

15 For more information see: National Action Plan (NAP) NAP setting objectives, targets, measures and timetables Indicators to monitor products containing substances of concern Use reduction targets if appropriate for risk reduction To take account of health, social, economic and environmental impacts, national, regional and local conditions and other legislation (e.g. WFD) Public participation To Commission by November 2012 and reviewed 5 yearly

16 For more information see: UK National Action Plan: Approach Outlines pesticides legislative regime – Authorisation, MRLs, Sustainable Use Directive Explains government’s wider strategic priorities – reducing burdens in business, improving productivity and competitiveness of farming, enhancing the environment and biodiversity – adopting a proportionate approach to regulation and removing un- necessary burdens Clarifies roles – Defra with strategic oversight, government and non-governmental organisations to work together Stakeholder consultations, role for the Pesticide Forum, supported by short-life and standing working groups

17 For more information see: National Action PlanNational Action Plan (NAP) Required under implementation of the Sustainable Use Directive for PPPs Provides framework for: – reducing the risks and impacts of pesticide use on human health and the environment – promoting the use of integrated pest management and of alternative approaches or techniques, such as non-chemical alternatives to pesticides.

18 For more information see: National Action Plan R&D Assurance schemes Regulation

19 For more information see: UK National Action Plan Objectives, targets, measures and timetables Objective: to ensure pesticides used sustainably, through promotion of risk reduction Priority areas: protection of water; better practice in amateur and amenity sectors, development and adoption of integrated approaches Targets include, maintaining current high levels of training and testing of application equipment and meeting objectives of Water Framework Directive Measures will include items listed in the National Action Plan

20 For more information see: Role of PF and NAP Ensure appropriate regulation and compliance Encourage current best practice Monitor progress (indicators) Identify and promote even better practice – Regulation – Industry initiatives – Research and Development Short-life working groups

21 For more information see: NAP – main headings Training – Improving standards – Operators - (R), advisers Sales – storekeeper certification Information and awareness raising – Consumer and health protection, wildlife protection Inspection of application equipment – Sprayer testing (R)- every 3 years from 2020; Annual (Assurance Schemes) Aerial application – very limited, permitted application only Protection of aquatic environment and drinking water Risk in specific areas – Protected areas, amenity Handling & storage, packaging – Sub-group & communication Integrated Pest Management (IPM) – encourage and support uptake – Baselines, sectoral needs, IPM Plans Indicators – Usage data (R), needs

22 For more information see: Key issues: NAP Protection of water Best practice in Amenity and Amateur Integrated approaches – Availability and viable techniques – Adoption

23 For more information see: Information to the public Member states may include in their National Action Plans provisions on informing people who may be exposed to spray drift Also provisions in authorisation regulation: approvals may specify the need to notify members of the public of applications and make spray records available

24 For more information see: Information to the public Regulation – Not a legal obligation Non-regulatory – Voluntary scheme from farmers

25 For more information see: Indicators of Sustainable Use 3

26 For more information see: Part 1: Training 4

27 For more information see: Training and Certification Training – initial and on-going – by November 2012 Access for users, distributors and advisors, to recognise different roles Training bodies designated by the competent authorities. Certification - by November 2013 Establish certification systems. Designate competent authorities responsible for implementation Establish requirements and procedures to grant, renew and withdraw certificates.

28 For more information see: Training Context Importance of training, market is able to meet demand and deliver to an appropriate quality. Retailer assurance schemes promote continuing professional development Regulation Law requires that all users must be trained initially. CRD has established system for designation of training bodies. Content of existing training courses has been updated Non-regulatory Industry has developed continuing professional development training programmes for users and initial and ongoing training for advisors and distributors

29 For more information see: Figure 1: Indicator - User practice: National Register of Sprayer Operators (NRoSO) (number of members & % sprayed area) Source: VI Annual Report

30 For more information see: Figure 2: Indicator - User Practice: BASIS professional register (number of members) Source: BASIS *2012 figure as at 31 Jan 2013

31 For more information see: Part 2: Sales.

32 For more information see: Sales distributors of non-professional products to provide general information on risks/mitigation/low-risk alternatives. by November 2015 distributers of professional products have sufficient staff with training certificate in employment. Staff with certificate to be available at time of sale. Micro-distributors may be exempt if not selling certain types of products. Member states to take measures to restrict sales of professional products to persons holding the certificate.

33 For more information see: Sales Context Pesticides purchased ‘on account’. Responsible distributors make enquiries before selling to persons ‘unknown’ Regulation Law requires: distributors to have sufficient staff with certificate available at point of sale; any person who purchases a pesticide to ensure end user holds a certificate; distributors of non-professional products to provide general information; and that storekeepers take ‘reasonable precautions’ to protect human health and the environment Other measures – High standards promoted by BASIS nominated storekeeper certificate – Information for non-professional products on simple/clear labels and Amateur Liaison Group

34 For more information see: Figure 3: BASIS Nominated Storekeeper (NSK) / Amenity Storekeeper (Amenity NSK) training courses: Total number of successful candidates Source: BASIS

35 For more information see: Figure 4: BASIS Garden Centre qualification (Guardian Certificate in Garden Care): number of candidates and passes Source: BASIS

36 For more information see: Part 3: Information and awareness raising 4

37 For more information see: Information and awareness raising Member states to take measures to inform the public and facilitate information and awareness raising programmes Information should be balanced and accurate and cover risks to human health and the environment and use of non-chemical alternatives Member states to put in place systems for gathering information on pesticide poisoning incidents

38 For more information see: Information and awareness raising Context Active sharing of information by government and stakeholders. EU Commission developing guidance document on monitoring systems Regulation Revised labelling to products (e.g. hard surfaces) Other measures Reviews on human health monitoring arrangements

39 For more information see: Figure 5: Indicator - Consumer protection: Maximum Residues Levels compliance % of fruit and vegetable samples tested and found with one or more residues above the MRL Source: Defra Expert Committee on Pesticide Residues in Food

40 For more information see: Figure 6: Indicator - Human health protection: PIAP investigations Source: HSE Pesticide Incident Appraisal Panel Report Number of incidents

41 For more information see: Figure 7: Indicator - Pesticide poisoning incidents investigated by the Wildlife Incident Investigation Scheme (WIIS) Source: CRD

42 For more information see: Part 4: Inspection of application equipment 5

43 For more information see: Inspection of application equipment Many different deadlines Certified equipment used from – 5 yearly tests until 2020, 3 yearly thereafter Possible exemptions or differing arrangements for certain types of application equipment Users to conduct regular calibrations and technical checks Designation of bodies to conduct tests/certification systems Mutual recognition of certificates

44 For more information see: Inspection of application equipment Context Market supplies demand for annual testing of application equipment Regulation New law requires all equipment to be tested in line with requirements of the directive. Also requires CRD to designate bodies to conduct inspections, keep a register of inspectors and grant certificates. Low-scale of use equipment to be inspected every 6 years. Derogation for knapsacks and handhelds. Professional users must carry out regular calibration checks Non-regulatory measures Retailer protocols specify annual testing of equipment

45 For more information see: Figure 8: Indicator - User practice: National Sprayer Testing Scheme (NSTS) (number of sprayer tests and % sprayed area) Source: VI Annual Report and NSTS /AEA (2011/2012) number of tests % sprayed area

46 For more information see: Figure 9: Membership of crop assurance schemes on holdings sampled in the United Kingdom Pesticide Usage Survey Source: Pesticide Usage Survey n = number of farms surveyed 1 = Surveys of GB only 2 = Excluding holdings only growing cider apples

47 For more information see: Part 5: Aerial application Indicators 408 permits issued in 2012

48 For more information see: Aerial spraying Prohibited but derogation possible if conditions met Designate authorities to set out conditions/ circumstances under which aerial spraying can be carried out Designated authority to consider application plans and issue permits to spray Monitoring to check compliance Records to be kept and made available to the public

49 For more information see: Aerial spraying Regulation Law allows CRD to issue permit to spray only when relevant conditions exist. Aviation legislation also regulates low-flying activities. Nature conservation legislation also relevant where CRD permits applications in or close to protected areas Non-regulatory Aerial Application Association developing Operating Standards (best practice guide)

50 For more information see: Part 6: Measures to protect the aquatic environment and drinking water 6

51 For more information see: Protection of the aquatic environment and drinking water ‘Appropriate measures’ support Water Framework Directive Give preference to particular products and application techniques Use mitigation measures that minimise risk of off-site pollution – including buffer zones and safeguard zones Minimise or eliminate applications on man- made surfaces with risk of run-off to water

52 For more information see: Protection of the aquatic environment and drinking water Context Pesticide pollution of water means that UK may fail to meet requirements of Water Framework Directive. Good understanding of pesticides which most frequently pollute surface waters and groundwaters Regulation Use of risk assessment and mitigation measures. Users to take ‘reasonable precautions’ to protect the environment, confine spray to target areas, minimise use in identified higher risk areas and give preference to particular product types. Also use of water legislation Incentives Use of subsidies to encourage adoption of best practice measures Non-regulatory Government and industry published guidance (Codes of Practice, Voluntary Initiative, Campaign for the Farmed Environment, Get Pelletwise, Amenity Forum), Catchment Sensitive Farming programme Research and Development programme to improve – understanding of behaviour of pesticides once released into the environment; precision of spraying; and safe disposal practice

53 For more information see: Figure 10: Indicator - Surface water Drinking Water Protected Areas (DrWPAs) in England and Wales where assessments indicate pesticides are putting WFD Article 7 compliance at risk Source: Environment Agency 15% at risk of non- compliance – metaldehyde – MCPA – chlorotoluron – mecoprop-P – carbetamide – 2,4-D – propyzamide

54 For more information see: Figure 14: Indicator – Groundwater bodies in England and Wales failing WFD objectives due to pesticides Source: Environment Agency 5% at risk of non- compliance – bentazone – mecoprop-P and 5 pesticides no longer available

55 For more information see: Figure 16: Indicator - Number of substantiated category 1 and 2 pollution incidents for land, air or water, involving agricultural and non-agricultural pesticides Source: Environment Agency

56 For more information see: Part 7: Reduction of risk in specific areas 7

57 For more information see: Reduction of use or risk in specific areas Member states shall, taking account of hygiene, public health and biodiversity requirements, ensure use in minimised or prohibited in: a.areas used by the general public or vulnerable groups (parks, gardens, sports and recreation grounds, school grounds and children’s playgrounds and in the close vicinity of healthcare facilities) b.WFD protected areas or Natura 2000 sites c.recently treated areas accessible to agricultural workers The use of low-risk products and biological control measures shall be considered in the first instance

58 For more information see: Reduction of use or risk in specific areas Context 10% of all pesticide use in public spaces. Use in conservation areas also subject to conditions of nature protection legislation Regulation Risk assessment process considers risk to public and workers in recently treated areas and imposes relevant mitigation measures (worker and human health protection legislation also relevant). Nature protection legislation imposes enhanced controls for sensitive sites Non-regulatory Amenity Forum developing best practice guidance. Training providers launching NASOR and Amenity Assured Research and Development into effectiveness and cost of integrated approaches

59 For more information see: Part 8: Handling and storage of pesticides & treatment of their packaging and remnants 7

60 For more information see: Handling and storage Adopt measures necessary to ensure the ensure following professional operations do not endanger human health or the environment a.storage, handling, dilution and mixing before application b.handling and packaging of remnants c.disposal of tank mixtures after application d.cleaning of equipment after application e.recovery or disposal of remnants and packaging in accordance with relevant waste legislation Storage areas constructed to ensure they prevent ‘unwanted releases Adopt measures to ensure non-professional users avoid dangerous handling operations (low-toxicity products, RTU, pack sizes)

61 For more information see: Handling and storage Context Evidence suggests generally done to a high standard but some groups of users better than others Regulation Risk assessment process identifies and mitigates risk (e.g. use closed transfer systems, container sizes, etc). Special requirements for authorisation of non-professional products. Legislation on use requires adoption of ‘reasonable precautions’ and construction of storage areas to prevent unwanted releases. Also legislation on pollution, waste, transport, accident hazards and building standards Non-regulatory Government and industry guidance. Capital grants also available in Catchment Sensitive Farming Scheme for infrastructure investments. Pesticide Forum Container Management Group Industry Voluntary Initiative promoting TOPPS guidance. BASIS store inspection scheme. Retailer protocols require adoption of relevant standards. Specific amenity and amateur guidance

62 For more information see: Figure 20: Indicator - User practice: Cross compliance checks, legislative breaches under SMR 9 and SMR 11 in 2011 Source: RPA inspection records

63 For more information see: Figure 21: Variation in Cross Compliance Breach Rate (SMR 9 & SMR 11) between 2006 and 2011 Source: RPA inspection records

64 For more information see: Figure 22: Comparison of number of cross compliance (SMR 9 and SMR 11) breaches and breach severity in 2011 Source: RPA inspection records n %= % reduction of Single Payment Scheme claim WL = Warning letter

65 For more information see: Part 9: Integrated Pest Management (IPM) 7

66 For more information see: Integrated Pest Management Take measures to promote low-input pest management (IPM and organic farming) – giving priority to non-chemical methods Establish and support establishment of conditions for implementation of IPM, ensuring users have information and tools to monitor pests and make decisions and access to advisory services Report to the Commission on the way in which and how successful they have been, in meeting these requirements by 30 June 2013 Describe in NAP how they will ensure general principles of IPM are implemented by users by 1 January 2014 Establish appropriate incentives to encourage users to implement crop or sector specific IPM guidelines on voluntary basis. Guidelines can be drawn up by public bodies or user organisations

67 For more information see: Integrated Pest Management Context Many users adopting elements of an integrated approach. Barriers to uptake are lack of quality and consistent level of control Regulation Training programmes must cover integrated approaches. Biopesticides Scheme to support registration of products Incentives Government support for farmers converting to organic production Non-regulatory Retailer protocols promote practices consistent with the general principles of IPM. Particular guidance for Forestry Research and Development Alternative approaches significant part of research programme

68 For more information see: IPM IPM = ICM (crop) = IFM (farm) What is the baseline? Sectoral needs vary IPM Plans – Agenda item October 2013 PF meeting – Check list – Greater encouragement – Site and season specific – Identify and monitor priorities at farm level

69 For more information see: Figure 23: Indicator - User practice: Crop Protection Management Plans (CPMPs) (area covered in hectares) Source: VI Annual Report (* 2011/12 figure is CPMP/LEAF combined data) hectares

70 For more information see: Figure 24: Indicator - Population of selected UK farmland bird species Source: Defra/British Trust for Ornithology/Joint Nature Conservation Committee/RSPB

71 For more information see: Figure 25: Indicator - Population of all UK bird species Source: Defra Index (1970=1)

72 For more information see: Figure 26: Indicator – Cumulative numbers of active substances and products approved as biopesticides, in any one year Source: HSE

73 For more information see: Figure 27: Comparison of number of biopesticides (active substances) registered in each EU member state according to the UK definition of a biopesticide (as at May 2012) Source: EU Pesticides Database, 2012

74 For more information see: Figure 28: Total number of active substances authorised* for use on plum crops, by type (*on-label and SOLA/EAMU) Source: HSE

75 For more information see: Figure 29: Total number of active substances authorised to control blossom wilt, plum fruit moth and perennial broad-leaved weeds in plum crops (on-label and SOLA/EAMU) Source: HSE

76 For more information see: Figure 30: Indicator – Pesticide Availability - Total number of active substances authorised* for use on winter oilseed rape crops, by type (*on-label and SOLA/EAMU) Source: HSE Notes: Active substances not used by growers: 1995: 4 herbicides, 5 insecticides, 1 PGR, 3 soil sterilants 2000: 2 herbicides, 3 insecticides, 1 PGR, 3 soil sterilants 2005: 1 fungicide, 1 insecticide, 1 molluscicide, 3 soil sterilants; 1 herbicide only available as SOLA/EAMU 2010: 2 fungicides, 1 herbicide, 2 insecticides, 1 molluscicide, 2 soil sterilants, 1 vertebrate control agent; 2 herbicides only available as SOLA/EAMU

77 For more information see: Figure 31: Indicator - Pesticide Availability – Total number of active substances authorised* to control phoma canker, cabbage stem flea beetle and cleavers in winter oilseed rape crops (*on-label and SOLA/EAMU) Source: HSE Notes: 2005: one herbicide authorised for cleaver control is only available as SOLA/EAMU 2010: one herbicide authorised for cleaver control is only available as SOLA/EAMU See Figure 32 for numbers of active substances used by growers against the target pests.

78 For more information see: Figure 32: Total number of active substances (probably) used by growers to control phoma canker, cabbage stem flea beetle and cleavers in winter oilseed rape crops (on-label and SOLA/EAMU) Source: HSE Notes: For 2005 and 2010: one herbicide authorised for cleaver control is only available as SOLA/EAMU

79 For more information see: Part 10: Indicators 10

80 For more information see: Indicators Member States shall: calculate the harmonised risk indicators using the sales and usage data collected under the statistics regulation; identify trends in the use of certain active substances; identify substances, crops, regions or practices that require attention or are examples of good practice Member states shall communicate the results of these evaluations to the Commission

81 For more information see: Indicators Context Sophisticated and long-standing suite of indicators prepared by Pesticides Forum. Awaiting development of EU HAIR indicators Regulatory measures Collection of pesticide usage and sales data. Food residue monitoring programme. Number of human health monitoring surveys (being reviewed) Non-regulatory Wildlife Incident monitoring schemes Research and development Pest, weed and disease survey reports

82 For more information see: Source: Food & Environment Research Agency (FERA) Pesticides Usage Survey N.B. Totals exclude sulphuric acid. * figures include Northern Ireland Figure 36: Indicator – Pesticide Usage Estimated annual usage for all crops in Great Britain (tonnes of active substance applied)

83 For more information see: CropMajor pest, disease or weed IncidenceImpact on pesticide use Notable changes in pesticide use Winter wheatSeptoria  Increased use of SDHI fungicides & increased rates. Winter WheatFusarium ear blight & Microdochium ear blight  Increased use of T3 ear wash sprays. Seed treatment expected to increase for Winter wheat & barleyAphids  =Increased BYDV in 2012 which could result in increased insecticide use in 2013 Winter wheatBlack-grass  =Increased resistance Oilseed rapeSclerotinia  = Key Issues and Pesticide Use- Arable Crops Pest, disease, weed incidence in 2011/12  =  Large increase Small increase NormalSmall decrease Large decrease Key: Source: ADAS See

84 For more information see: Key Issues and Pesticide Use- Arable Crops II Pest, disease, weed incidence in 2011/12 CropMajor pest, disease or weed IncidenceImpact on pesticide use Notable changes in pesticide use PotatoLate blight  Number of sprays increased (from 10 per crop) as newer, more aggressive disease strains develop. PotatoStorage diseases  = Oilseed rapeSclerotinia  =Recommendation that MBC, SDHI and strobilurins are not used more than once on their own Oilseed rapeLight leaf Spot  = MaizeEyespot   =  Large increase Small increase NormalSmall decrease Large decrease Key: Source: ADAS See

85 For more information see: CropMajor pest, disease or weed IncidenceImpact on pesticide use Notable changes in pesticide use Soft Fruit (strawberry) Slugs  High levels in the summer resulted in increased molluscicide use. StrawberryRedcore  Fosetyl-aluminium (Aliette) until stocks ran out then switched to the newly introduced fenamidone + fosetyl- aluminium (fenomenal) AppleApple scab  More sprays at poor timings due to weather issues. CarrotAll disease  =Protectant sprays used therefore application occurs before symptoms OnionDowny Mildew  Increased use of Unicur and Valbon due to short harvest intervals Key Issues and Pesticide Use- Horticulture Crops Pest, disease, weed incidence in 2011/12  =  Large increase Small increase NormalSmall decrease Large decrease Key: Source: ADAS See

86 For more information see: Figure 37: Indicator - Cropped areas (in hectares) in the UK Source: Defra UK June Agricultural Survey 2012, Welsh Government hectares

87 For more information see: Figure 38: Indicator - Pesticide average inputs per crop (kg active substance applied per hectare grown) in the UK including soil sterilants Source: Pesticides Usage Survey Surveys are not conducted annually for all crops. The most recent year of data availability is shown against each crop. *Figures relate to GB usage only, other figures are for UK usage kg active substance applied per hectare grown

88 For more information see: Figure 39: Indicator - Pesticide average inputs per crop (kg active substance applied per hectare grown) in the UK excluding soil sterilants Source: Pesticides Usage Survey Surveys are not conducted annually for all crops. The most recent year of data availability is shown against each crop. *Figures relate to GB usage only, other figures are for UK usage kg active substance applied per hectare grown

89 For more information see: Figure 40: Indicator – Pesticide average inputs for oilseed rape (kg active substance applied per hectare grown) in Great Britain Source: Pesticides Usage Survey kg active substance applied per hectare grown

90 For more information see: Figure 41: Indicator - Herbicide use on oilseed rape (number of products and total doses of active substances per hectare) Source: Pesticides Usage Survey kg active substance per hectare

91 For more information see: Figure 42: Indicator - Insecticide use on oilseed rape (number of products and total doses of active substances per hectare) Source: Pesticides Usage Survey kg active substance per hectare

92 For more information see: Summary and future plans 10

93 For more information see: Summary - usage Use of pesticides not impacting adversely UK health or environment – statutory and voluntary controls effective, but – scope to reduce risks further Pesticide usage affected by season, product availability, resistance, commodity prices – continued decline in use of active substance – application technology continues to improve precision of application Training of pesticide users increasing – 85% sprayed area are NRoSO members – improvements in Amenity and for garden centre staff

94 For more information see: Summary – focus for improvement Further reduce water bodies at risk from pesticides Key bird species continue to decline More recycling of packaging Reduce misuse and/or abuse Improve users understanding of risk and risk mitigation in both the amenity and the home and garden sectors

95 For more information see: Summary – future plans Continue to meet challenge of securing food supply Continue to encourage best practice Implementation of National Action Plan (NAP) – Pesticides Forum is principal stakeholder group – Implementation of Sustainable Use Directive (SUD) – Promotion of IPM/Integrated Crop Management (ICM) Short-life working groups and expert contributions – specific topics identified by Government or stakeholders – report back to Pesticides Forum Indicators – To further align with SUD and NAP

96 For more information see: Priorities for 2012/13 Protecting water – Metaldehyde, oilseed rape herbicides Improving standards in non-agricultural sectors – Amenity; home and garden Promotion of IPM Pesticides Forum will work with member organisations and other stakeholders to help further reduce the risk to human health and the environment

97 For more information see: Acknowledgements Member Organisations of the Pesticides Forum and many others – provide data and analysis used in Indicators


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