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W ELCOME ! Introduction by Lisa Gilbert Superintendent of TUSD 1.

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Presentation on theme: "W ELCOME ! Introduction by Lisa Gilbert Superintendent of TUSD 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 W ELCOME ! Introduction by Lisa Gilbert Superintendent of TUSD 1

2 B ULLYING, G ENDER AND SEX - BASED HARASSMENT : Tim Beard; Personnel Director Sharon Owen; Licensed Educational Psychologist Dawn Roach; School Psychologist Wade Barrett; School Psychologist 2

3 C ALIFORNIA H EALTHY K IDS SURVEY CONDUCTED SCHOOL YEAR : I N THE PAST 12 MONTHS HOW MANY TIMES ON SCHOOL PROPERTY DID STUDENTS REPORT THAT THEY WERE BULLIED FOR THE FOLLOWING REASONING 3 0 Times 1 Time 2-3 Times4 or more Race, ethnicity, or national origin94%3% Gender91%6%3% Because they either identified themselves as gay or Lesbian or someone thought they were 91%3%6% A physical or mental disability95%5% Any other reason71%8%21%

4 B ULLYING L AWS AND P OLICIES Federal U.S. Department of Education/Office for Civil Rights Department of Justice State California Department of Education California Education Code Local Tehachapi Unified School District Board Board Policies 4

5 B ULLYING L AWS AND P OLICIES Federal There are no federal laws that directly addresses bullying, in some cases, bullying overlaps with discriminatory harassment when it is based on race, national origin, color, sex, age, disability, or religion. When bullying and harassment overlap, federally-funded schools have an obligation to resolve the harassment. When the situation is not adequately resolved, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division may get involved. 5

6 B ULLYING L AWS AND P OLICIES State California Department of Education (CDE) The CDE and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction are responsible for enforcing education law and regulations; and for continuing to reform and improve public elementary school programs, secondary school programs, adult education, some preschool programs, and child care programs. 6

7 B ULLYING L AWS AND P OLICIES California Education Codes 200. It is the policy of the State of California to afford all persons in public schools, regardless of their disability, gender, gender identity, gender expression, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other characteristic that is contained in the definition of hate crimes set forth in Section of the Penal Code, equal rights and opportunities in the educational institutions of the state. The purpose of this chapter is to prohibit acts that are contrary to that policy and to provide remedies thereof. 7

8 B ULLYING L AWS AND P OLICIES California Education Codes (continued) Section 201 Section 220 Section Section 233 Section 234 Section Section Section Section

9 B ULLYING L AWS AND P OLICIES Tehachapi Unified School District, Board Policies BP 0410 – Nondiscrimination In District Programs and Activities. BP – Uniform Complaint Procedure AR – Uniform Complaint Procedure BP – Nondiscrimination/Harassment BP – Sexual and Gender Based Harassment AR – Sexual and Gender Based Harassment 9

10 10

11 D ISCRIMINATION, H ARASSMENT, OR B ULLY C OMPLAINT I NVESTIGATION 11  The School Principal, Title IX Coordinator, or designee will conduct the investigation.  The School Principal and Vice Principal are your site based designated individual(s) who can answer questions or concerns regarding polices and regulations related to sexual and gender based harassment.  Traci Minjares is the District Office Title IX Coordinator.

12 I NCIDENT T IMELINE P ROCEDURE 12

13 C ALIFORNIA H EALTHY K IDS SURVEY CONDUCTED SCHOOL YEAR : I N THE PAST 12 MONTHS HOW MANY TIMES ON SCHOOL PROPERTY DID STUDENTS REPORT THAT THEY WERE BULLIED FOR THE FOLLOWING REASONING 13 0 Times 1 Time 2-3 Times4 or more Race, ethnicity, or national origin94%3% Gender91%6%3% Because they either identified themselves as gay or Lesbian or someone thought they were 91%3%6% A physical or mental disability95%5% Any other reason71%8%21%

14 C ALIFORNIA H EALTHY K IDS S URVEY Cyber Bullying in the past 12 months 0 times= 63 % 1 time=12% 2-3 times=17% 4 or more=8% 14

15 C ALIFORNIA H EALTHY K IDS S URVEY V IOLENCE BY B OYFRIEND /G IRLFRIEND 11 percent of the surveyed students reported that they had experienced physical Violence by Boyfriend/Girlfriend, Past 12 months 15

16 C ALIFORNIA H EALTHY K IDS S URVEY S AD /H OPELESS F EELINGS AND CONTEMPLATED SUICIDE 41 percent of TUSD students surveyed reported sad or hopeless feelings in the past 12 months 30 percent of TUSD students surveyed seriously considered attempting suicide, past 12 months 16

17 Recognize Respond Report 17

18 R ECOGNIZE Review of What defines Bullying? Bullying is a form of emotional or physical abuse that has three defining characteristics: 1. Deliberate—a bully’s intention is to hurt someone. 2. Repeated—a bully often targets the same victim again and again. 3. Power Imbalanced—a bully chooses victims he or she perceives as vulnerable. 18

19 DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT Discrimination and harassing behavior based on sex including (gender, gender identity gender expression, and nonconformity with gender stereotypes), race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, ethnic group identification, marital or parental status, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation or the perception of or association with someone who has or is perceived to have one or more of such characteristics violates federal and/or state civil rights law and denies equal educational opportunities for all students. 19

20 Discrimination may occur when an individual or individuals are treated differently specifically because of a specific characteristic. Unintended behavior or action that ultimately results in treating a group differently may be a form of discrimination. 20

21 SEXUAL HARASSMENT AND GENDER-BASED HARASSMENT Making comments, name-calling, conduct of a physical nature, or other expressive behavior directed at an individual or group on the basis of gender, sexual orientation, perceived sexual orientation, gender expression, and nonconformity with gender stereotypes falls under the category of sexual harassment / gender-based harassment and is prohibited. Sexual harassment and gender-based harassment can also take place between people of the same sex. 21

22 B EHAVIORS THAT MAY CONSTITUTE SEXUAL HARASSMENT ( NOT INCLUSIVE ) Unwelcome leering, sexual flirtations, or propositions Sexual slurs, epithets, threats, verbal abuse, derogatory comments Unwelcome or offensive comments about an individual’s body, sexual jokes, sexually degrading descriptions, or obscene gestures Derogatory posters, notes, stories, cartoons, drawings, pictures, or computer generated images of a sexual nature; Spreading sexual rumors 22

23 B EHAVIORS THAT MAY CONSTITUTE SEXUAL HARASSMENT ( NOT INCLUSIVE ) Disparaging, offensive or unwelcome sexual remarks about students enrolled in a predominately single sex class. (non-conformity to gender stereotypes. Girls in woodshop class and boys taking dance) Unwelcome touching of an individual’s body or clothes in a sexual way ( including massaging, grabbing, fondling, stroking, or brushing the body); Impeding or blocking movements or any physical interference with school activities when directed at an individual on the basis of sex; and Displaying sexually suggestive objects. 23

24 B EHAVIORS THAT MAY CONSTITUTE GENDER - BASED HARASSMENT ( NOT INCLUSIVE ) Slurs, threats, derogatory comments, unwelcome jokes, or degrading descriptions related to or because of a students gender or gender identity; Disparaging remarks about a student or aggression toward a student because that student displays mannerisms or a style of dress inconsistent with stereotypical characteristics of the students sex; Hostility toward a student because that student pursues and interest or participates in an academic or athletic activity more typically favored by a student of the opposite sex; Disparaging remarks about a student because the student socializes with students of the opposite sex or is predominately friends with students of the opposite sex; 24

25 B EHAVIORS THAT MAY CONSTITUTE GENDER - BASED HARASSMENT ( NOT INCLUSIVE ) Unwelcome references to the student as being a member of the opposite sex, such as referring to a female student as “He” or referring to a male student as a “girl”; Ostracizing or refusing to participate in group activities with a student during class projects, physical education classes, or field trips because of that students sex, gender expression, or gender identity; Intimidating a student to discourage that student from enrolling in a particular area of study or school activity because of his or her gender; Taunting a student who is struggling with a subject of the curriculum by insisting that students of that gender are bad at that subject area; and Teasing or gender based remarks about students because they are enrolled in a predominately single sex class. 25

26 W HAT IF I’ M NOT SURE ? It’s okay if you aren’t sure that what you are witnessing or what is being reported to you is bullying or sex-based harassment. If the behavior is inappropriate address the behavior You can privately ask the student if the behavior is acceptable to them. Some behavior may be inappropriate for school, but may not constitute sex-based harassment if it is welcome/ not unwanted. Report it and allow someone else to do the investigating. 26

27 L ET ’ S G ET R EAL ! B ULLYING, GENDER & S EXUAL BASED HARASSMENT FROM STUDENTS ’ PERSPECTIVE. 27

28 R ECOGNIZE : F LIRTING OR H URTING A CTIVITY Verbal or WrittenGesturesPhysical FlirtingHarassmentFlirtingHarassmentFlirtingHarassment Depends on: 28

29 L ET ’ S G ET R EAL ! B ULLYING, GENDER & S EXUAL BASED HARASSMENT FROM STUDENTS ’ PERSPECTIVE. 29

30 N EGATIVE I MPACT OF S EXUAL AND G ENDER B ASED HARASSMENT HOSTILE ENVIRONMENT: The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) defined a hostile environment as including "unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature by an employee, by another student, or by a third party, that is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive to limit a student's ability to participate in or benefit from an educational program or activity, or to create a hostile or abusive educational environment" (Department of Education, 1997, p ). 30

31 The Department Of Education has listed the effects of student-on-student harassment in school as including lowered academic achievement and aspirations; increased anxiety; loss of self-esteem and confidence; depression and post-traumatic stress; general deterioration of physical health; self-harm and suicidal thinking; feelings of alienation in the school environment, such as fear of other children; and absenteeism from school. -factsheet pdf -factsheet pdf It creates an environment of inequality in which a given group is not provided the same opportunities as others. 31

32 I MPORTANCE OF S ENSITIVITY TO AND T OLERANCE OF THE DIVERSITY OF THE STUDENT BODY. The United States is one of the most diverse societies in the world. Students differ in age, race, sexual orientation, religion, and culture. Students are surround by diversity. It is important for students to be taught tolerance and for diversity with respect. This allows all students to learn and develop in a comfortable and safe educational environment. 32

33 Diversity enriches the educational experience. We learn from those whose experiences, beliefs, and perspectives are different from our own. Diversity challenges stereotyped preconceptions; it encourages critical thinking; and it helps students learn to communicate effectively with people of varied backgrounds. Education within a diverse setting prepares students to become good citizens in an increasingly complex society. It fosters mutual respect and teamwork; and it helps build communities where people are judged by the quality of their character and their contributions. For the United States to remain competitive it will require us to make effective use of the talents and abilities of all our citizens. 33

34 ROOT CAUSES OF SEX-BASED AND GENDER BASED HARASSMENT 1) What do you think are some of the root causes of gender and sex-based harassment? 2)What do you think is some of the harm that results from that? 34

35 RESPOND When you see bullying/harassment happen step between the students. Remain calm and tell the student doing the bullying in clear terms what the problem is and that that behavior is not allowed. Ex: “Calling someone names is against the rules. I won’t allow students to hurt each other.” Follow through with school policies on the behavior Praise bystanders/upstanders that stepped up When appropriate conference with the students involved privately. Shaming a bully in front of classmates is not likely to change the behavior Document/report the incident and actions taken 35

36 H OW TO FOSTER A NON - DISCRIMINATORY EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT Classroom: Set classroom agreements and stick to them Treat each other with empathy and respect Talk about how we feel with the teacher and each other Be fair to each other and to ourselves Make an anonymous suggestion box Do activities that help us learn more about others Try to include everyone in class discussions and activities Watch out for each other outside of class Share what we learn about different societies and cultures Say something nice to someone we don’t often talk to -Let’s Get Real

37 H OW TO FOSTER A NON - DISCRIMINATORY EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT Students o Talk about it o Become and Upstander (a person who takes appropriate action) o Report incidents of name-calling and bullying o Don’t bully others o Avoid stereotypes o Promote anti-bullying through how you act, how you talk, and with posters and other forms of expression. o If you are feeling down or angry or are experiencing bullying find a safe adult to talk to. o Make friends outside of your usual group. -Let’s Get Real

38 H OW TO FOSTER A NON - DISCRIMINATORY EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT Teacher/Coach Be a good listener Set clear classroom or locker room ground rules that promote respect. Intervene when you witness a disrespectful act; be consistent. Promote anti-bullying and celebrate diversity and other cultures in your classroom. Connect with your students and keep a lookout for changes in typically behavior. Be supportive and respectful of those who are different from you; colleagues, parents, and students. Treat students in a fair and bias free manner and set clear and realistic expectations. -Let’s Get Real

39 REPORT Report using the District Discrimination, Harassment, or Bullying Complaint form within 24 hours. This form is for use by staff, students, parents, and other invested parties. The form is located on the District website under the “Safe and Inclusive Schools” button on the left side of the main screen. Turn the form in to any staff member 39

40 D ISCUSSION /S UMMARY Personal Action Plan Impressions? Questions? 40

41 R ESOURCES /R EFERENCES Let’s Get Real education/Hostile-Learning-Environment-in-Special- Education.html heet-education.aspx edrevisedDistric.pdf bullying.aspx (Department of Education, 1997, p ). factsheet pdf 41


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