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Kellogg School & The Common Core Initiative. What do we know? Julie Pienta: Early Adopter School, Project Readi Eileen Scanlan: Self- initiated PD, Gretchen.

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Presentation on theme: "Kellogg School & The Common Core Initiative. What do we know? Julie Pienta: Early Adopter School, Project Readi Eileen Scanlan: Self- initiated PD, Gretchen."— Presentation transcript:

1 Kellogg School & The Common Core Initiative

2 What do we know? Julie Pienta: Early Adopter School, Project Readi Eileen Scanlan: Self- initiated PD, Gretchen Courtney Kellogg Teachers: General introductions SY by Rock Island Network; ILT Members attended Summer 2012 PD In Progress… Continue to learn! Unit Planning New 6 th – 8 th ELA Series GO! Math Lead 21 Balancing ISAT for 2 more years with CCSS instruction Prepare for CPS initiative with CCSS Math in 2013 Close Reading practice Text-Dependent Questions Novels In Progress… Continue to learn! Unit Planning New 6 th – 8 th ELA Series GO! Math Lead 21 Balancing ISAT for 2 more years with CCSS instruction Prepare for CPS initiative with CCSS Math in 2013 Close Reading practice Text-Dependent Questions Novels

3 Objectives By the end of this presentation… You should feel confident in talking with your child and their teacher(s) about the CC initiative in ELA Possess knowledge, tools, and resources to best support this process in your home and in school

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5 1.Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction 2.Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational 3.Regular practice with complex text and its academic language ELA/Literacy: 3 shifts The What

6 What Can Parents Do? Shift One: Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction  Supply and read more non fiction text at home. Have fun with it!  Look for books and/or opportunities to engage in text that explains. (Newspaper and magazine articles, directions for putting things together, controversial subjects in the world)  Discuss the authors’ purposes for their writing and possible biases

7 Shift Two: Reading, writing, and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational 1.Talk about all types of text! 2.Demand EVIDENCE in everyday discussions/disagreements/debates 2.Read text together and provide questions that require evidence – PROVE IT 2.Teach healthy debate – allow disagreements What Can Parents Do?

8 Shift Three: Regular practice with complex text and its academic language 1.Read multiple books about the same topic 2.Use academic and higher level language when speaking 3.Close Reading of all types of text 4.Talk, listen, sing, make rhymes, and silly word games! What Can Parents Do?

9 “Read like a detective, write like a reporter.”

10 Implementation Close Reading Text Dependent Questions Evidence! Nonfiction! Collaboration and Student “Talk” Reading a text multiple times for different purposes Text-dependent questions will point students toward parts of the text most important to pay attention to Prove it! Quote! New series, content areas small groups working together, pair/shares, whole class discussions

11 Simply assigning hard books will not ensure that students learn at high levels! Simply assigning hard books will not ensure that students learn at high levels!

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13 Common Core State Standards vs. Old IL Learning Standards Common Core State StandardsOld IL Learning Standards Reading for Information Standard 1: 6 th Grade Goal 1 –Reading: Middle School RI.6.1: Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments 1.C.3d Summarize and make generalizations from content and relate them to the purpose of the material.

14 A Close Reading of “Salvador, Late or Early” (Cisneros, Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories, 1991)

15 Model of Close Reading 1. Read the text 2. What are Salvador’s strengths and needs? Discuss whole group 3. I will read to you. Think about the author’s use of color. 4. Read it again. Why does our author use school words and associate them with pain? Discuss in your group Salvador translates to savior. Where in the text is that supported? 5. What happens when I change the name SALVADOR to HEATHER? He starts out as a caterpillar and by the end he flutters in the air before disappearing like a memory of kites What changed? Childhood, class, poverty, gender, social aspects,

16 Ideas/Reflections A lot of this learning is dependent upon conversations with someone This piece of text is an 8 th grade exemplar. This text is now a two day teaching….it used to be 1/3 rd of a day. The order in which you ask the questions leads to a better and deeper understanding of the text. The order in which you ask the questions matters for ones understanding of a text. Not every group discussion needs to be shared out whole class An Extended Response prompt could be, “How does Salvador feel inside?” If students can defend their opinion with evidence from the text, it doesn’t matter what feeling they believe Salvador has inside

17 General Understandings in Kindergarten Retell the story in order using the words beginning, middle, and end.

18 Key Details in Kindergarten How long did it take to go from a hatched egg to a butterfly? What is one food that gave him a stomachache? What is one food that did not him a stomachache?

19 It took more than 3 weeks. He ate for one week, and then “he stayed inside [his cocoon] for more than two weeks.”

20 Chocolate cake Ice cream Pickle Swiss cheese Salami Lollipop Cherry pie Sausage Cupcake watermelon Foods that did not give him a stomachache Apples Pears Plums Strawberries Oranges Green leaf Foods that gave him a stomachache

21 Vocabulary in Kindergarten How does the author help us to understand what cocoon means?

22 There is an illustration of the cocoon, and a sentence that reads, “He built a small house, called a cocoon, around himself.”

23 Genre: Entertain? Explain? Inform? Persuade? Point of view: First-person, third-person limited, omniscient, unreliable narrator Critical Literacy: Whose story is not represented? Author’s Purpose

24 Author’s Purpose in Kindergarten Who tells the story—the narrator or the caterpillar?

25 A narrator tells the story, because he uses the words he and his. If it was the caterpillar, he would say I and my.

26 Inferences in Kindergarten The title of the book is The Very Hungry Caterpillar. How do we know he is hungry?

27 The caterpillar ate food every day “but he was still hungry.” On Saturday he ate so much food he got a stomachache! Then he was “a big, fat caterpillar” so he could build a cocoon and turn into a butterfly.

28 Opinions, Arguments, and Intertextual Connections Author’s opinion and reasoning (K-5) Claims Evidence Counterclaims Ethos, Pathos, Logos Rhetoric Links to other texts throughout the grades

29 Opinions and Intertextual Connections in Kindergarten Narrative Is this a happy story or a sad one? How do you know? Informational How are these two books similar? How are they different?

30 What is a Close Reading? Close reading is meant to be completed using short texts at grade level Close reading is meant to be completed over several repeated readings over several teaching periods Close reading is meant to be a collaborative process amongst peers and facilitated by an educator

31 Use a short passage. “Read with a pencil.” Note what’s confusing. Pay attention to patterns. Give students the chance to struggle a bit. Creating a Close Reading


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