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1 YARD “WASTE” MANAGEMENT IN DELAWARE Presented by: James D. Werner Director, Division of Air and Waste Management Presented to: The Yard Waste Management.

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Presentation on theme: "1 YARD “WASTE” MANAGEMENT IN DELAWARE Presented by: James D. Werner Director, Division of Air and Waste Management Presented to: The Yard Waste Management."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 YARD “WASTE” MANAGEMENT IN DELAWARE Presented by: James D. Werner Director, Division of Air and Waste Management Presented to: The Yard Waste Management Committee Smyrna, Delaware August 31, 2005

2 2 We Are Already Diverting About One-Third of our Yard “Waste” Amount collected for disposal or processing: 145,800 T/yr. Percent diverted from disposal: 34% Source: DSM Environmental Services, Inc., 2004

3 3 10 Delaware Municipalities Have Yard “Waste” Programs

4 4 Yard “Waste” is Nearly ¼ of the Residential Waste in Delaware Source: DSM Environmental Services, Inc., 2004

5 5 23 States Have Restrictions on Yard “Waste” Disposal Source: DSM Environmental Services, Inc., 2004

6 6 All Neighboring States Have Restrictions on Yard “Waste” Disposal Restrictions in neighboring states: Maryland and Pennsylvania: Restriction applies to loads that are primarily or entirely yard “waste.” New Jersey: restriction applies to leaves only. Some other states’ yard “waste” restrictions Connecticut: grass clippings only. Arkansas and Nebraska: leaves and grass. Indiana: leaves, brush, and wood vegetation larger than 3 feet. Source: BioCycle, January 2004

7 7 Legal Yard “Waste” Restrictions Are Effective Source: DSM Environmental Services, Inc., 2004 Regardless of how a state defines “yard waste” or what a state’s restriction consists of, legal restrictions on disposal of yard “waste” have a significant impact on the diversion of this material. Average per-capita diversion in 13 states with no restrictions is 83 pounds. Average per-capita diversion in 16 states with restriction is 215 pounds.

8 8 Delaware’s Proposed Legislation: S.B. 225 The legislation defines “Organic Yard Waste” as “plant material resulting from lawn maintenance and other horticultural gardening and landscaping activities and includes grass, leaves, prunings, brush, shrubs, garden material, Christmas trees and tree limbs up to 4 inches in diameter.” Provisions of S.B. 225 pertaining to yard “waste”: All persons shall separate organic yard “waste” from other solid waste generated at their residence or place of business. Transporters shall not dispose of source separated organic yard “waste” by landfilling but shall deliver the material to a processor. DNREC and DSWA shall adopt guidelines for yard “waste” facilities by July 1, Local governments may apply for competitive grants to help with start-up costs. If the private sector does not establish facilities to handle all of the yard “waste,” DSWA will manage the material. DSWA, in conjunction with DNREC, will conduct public education to maximize yard “waste” recovery.

9 9 Various Groups Will be Affected by the Legislation Residents and businesses: must keep yard “waste” separate from trash and either handle it on site or arrange for transport to a processing facility. Trash haulers: must decide whether to offer yard “waste” pickup service. Haulers that collect separated yard “waste” must take it to a processing facility, not to a landfill. Towns and cities currently collecting and processing yard “waste”: may need to adjust their programs to include more materials and may need to upgrade their processing facilities. Those not currently managing yard “waste” will need to provide this service, either directly or through contracts. Existing landscaping and tree services: will not be significantly affected. Surveys show they send very little yard “waste” to landfills. DSWA and DNREC: will have responsibilities for adopting guidelines for facilities, for educating the public, and for ensuring processing capacity to manage the material.

10 10 Costs of Processing Yard “Waste” Will Depend on Types and Sizes of Facilities The processing capacity needed to handle the diverted yard “waste” could be met by establishing 5 to 7 low- to intermediate- technology sites at various locations in the state. Costs for construction and operation of these sites would require tipping fees estimated in the range of $32 to $48 per ton. Projected initial capital investment required would range from $358,000 to $700,000 (assuming that facilities could be located on existing DSWA sites). Projected monthly cost to homeowners for collection service would range from $4 to $5 in unincorporated areas and from $2 to $3 in incorporated areas having organized trash collection. Source: DSM Environmental Services, Inc., 2004

11 11 Benefits of Keeping Yard “Waste” Out of the Landfills Extended landfill life. Reduction in greenhouse gas emissions An incentive for the establishment or expansion of businesses interested in producing mulch or compost. An incentive for homeowners to manage their yard “waste” in a more sustainable way by composting, mulching, and grasscycling.

12 12 Committee Mandate and Objectives Review, revise, and develop plan for management of yard “waste” Develop guidelines for yard “waste” mulching and composting facilities Identify private sector interest in yard “waste” mulching and composting Identify markets for mulch and compost


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