Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Sustained Compliance for Public Water Systems, Chapter 2 Workshop Anchorage, Alaska Sept. 30, 2011 Tyler.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Sustained Compliance for Public Water Systems, Chapter 2 Workshop Anchorage, Alaska Sept. 30, 2011 Tyler."— Presentation transcript:

1 Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Sustained Compliance for Public Water Systems, Chapter 2 Workshop Anchorage, Alaska Sept. 30, 2011 Tyler Fanning DEC Drinking Water Program 1

2 2 Tyler Fanning Public Water Systems Security Specialist Division of Environmental Health Drinking Water Program (907)

3 Outcomes How drinking water directly contributes to overall public health in an emergency How drinking water systems can prevent, prepare for, and recover from natural disasters and human-caused incidents Understand proposed emergency preparedness regulation changes that may affect your system How drinking water directly contributes to overall public health in an emergency How drinking water systems can prevent, prepare for, and recover from natural disasters and human-caused incidents Understand proposed emergency preparedness regulation changes that may affect your system 3

4 Agenda History and Background Public Water Systems Disasters and Preparedness Milestones Building blocks for a prepared water system Personal Preparedness Vulnerability Assessment (VA) Emergency Response Plan (ERP) Staff training/exercises Tools and Resources Federal State Mutual Aid Agreements History and Background Public Water Systems Disasters and Preparedness Milestones Building blocks for a prepared water system Personal Preparedness Vulnerability Assessment (VA) Emergency Response Plan (ERP) Staff training/exercises Tools and Resources Federal State Mutual Aid Agreements 4

5 Public Water Systems Direct Contributor to Public Health Critical Infrastructure 5

6 "...water supply facilities offer a particularly vulnerable point of attack to the foreign agent, due to the strategic position they occupy in keeping the wheels of industry turning and in preserving the health and morale of the American populace." -J. Edgar Hoover First director of the FBI 6

7 September 11, 2001 Hurricane Katrina August 29, Milestones in Emergency Preparedness

8 8 Milestone: September 11, 2001

9 New Federal Regulation 9 Emergency Preparedness and Security Requirements for PWS Awareness of Drinking Water Vulnerability Increased With the Events of 9/11 Bioterrorism Act of 2002 (Title IV, Drinking Water Security & Safety) Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act June 2002

10 Milestone: Hurricane Katrina Water sector was a critical infrastructure that was not well prepared Utilities not aware of protocols for requesting assistance and communicating needs In an emergency the government response will not be immediate Water sector was a critical infrastructure that was not well prepared Utilities not aware of protocols for requesting assistance and communicating needs In an emergency the government response will not be immediate 10

11 Preparedness is changing 9/11 Natural Disasters Detect Delay Deter Respond Detect Delay Deter Respond Response Recovery Resilience Response Recovery Resilience 11 “All-Hazards” Planning

12 12

13 13

14 14 Mt. Redoubt 1990

15 15 Cleveland Volcano 2011

16 16

17 17 Eagle 2009

18 18

19 19

20 20

21 21

22 22

23 23

24 24

25 25

26 26 “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” - Benjamin Franklin

27 PWS Security Requirements Bioterrorism Act of

28 Current Alaska Administrative Code Effective Oct. 1999, ADEC 18 AAC (d)(4) states…. " a written contingency plan showing that the owner is able to provide water … within 24 hours after an event that has the potential to cause … contamination of the water system or … a lack of water pressure or supply.” 28

29 Alaska Regulations Future ** Proposed in 2011 ** 29

30 All new public water systems beginning operation after effective date must have an ERP/PMP in place. Systems currently in operation must complete an ERP/PMP within 18 months of effective date. Alaska Regulations Future Updated biennially 30 ** Proposed in 2011 **

31 31

32 Reviewand update plans Staff training and exercises Emergency Response Plan (ERP) or Priority Measures Plan (PMP) Vulnerability Assessment Personal Preparation 32 Building Blocks for a Prepared Water System Coordinating with Partners

33 Personal Preparedness You can’t help anyone else if you’re worried about yourself, your family, or your property. Take care of you and yours first ! 33

34 What is a Vulnerability Assessment? To plan for emergency, PWS needs to know : Which PWS component may fail Severity of failure Duration, financial and health effects How to alleviate problem 34 The process of identifying, quantifying, and prioritizing (or ranking) the vulnerabilities in a system. Vulnerability from the perspective of disaster management means evaluating the threats from potential hazards to the population and to infrastructure. Gap Analysis - a process of identifying security deficiencies and tasks to be completed. This results in a prioritized action item list or punch list of items to be accomplished.

35 Vulnerability Assessment (Cont.) A VA consists of four major elements 35 Characterization of the System Mission and Objectives Identify and Prioritize Risks and Adverse Consequences Analyze Identified Risks & Evaluate the “State of Readiness”

36 36 Complexity of VA Process System Size System Infrastructure Populations Affected Source Water Treatment Complexity

37 37

38 38

39 A documented plan Describes actions to take in response to major incident Threats Intentional Acts Major disasters Catastrophic incidents Damage & severe disruptions 39 The Emergency Response Plan

40 ERP: 8 Core Elements 40

41 Smaller Systems: The Priority Measures Plan 41

42 1. System Specific Information PWSID, Owner, Contact information Population Served and Service Connections Distribution Map Site Plans and Facility “As-Built” Engineering Drawings Operating Procedures and System Descriptions including back-up systems and interconnections with other systems; SCADA System/Process Control Systems Operations Communications System Operation Site Staffing Rosters and Employees’ Duties and Responsibilities Chemical Handling and/or Storage Facilities and Release Impact Analyses Source, Pumping, Treatment Critical Customer Critical Docs. 42 ERP: 8 Core Elements

43 2. PWS Roles & Responsibilities Establish a clear chain of command Designate ER Lead Evaluate incoming info Manage resources, staff Decide response actions Coordinate efforts with 1 st responders Reachable 24/7 Identified roles are utility specific! Owner, Director, or Elected Official Alternate ER Lead ER LeadOperator Media Liaison 43 ERP: 8 Core Elements ** Included in Priority Measures Plan **

44 3. Communication Procedures: Internal Notification List Internal Chain of Command External Non-PWS Notification List First Responders & previously contacted entities Affected customers or critical customers\ Vendors for replacement equip/chem supplies 44 Public/Media Notification: Generate a set of general guidelines for the Media Liaison to follow to craft concise messages targeted for different audiences -- Media, residential, local health officials, business customers Draft Press Releases and Public Water Restriction Notices in Advance Have methods in place for delivering messages In a major incident, it may not be possible to use normal channel of communication. Names/Titles/Land line /Cell/ /Address/Pager ** Included in Priority Measures Plan ** ERP: 8 Core Elements

45 Evacuation Plan Routes/Exits Assembly Areas and Accountability Emergency Response Equipment Personal Protective Equipment First Aid Kits Spill Prevention Control Risk Management Procedures MSDS Sheets UNDERSTAND WHEN AND HOW 45 ERP: 8 Core Elements 4. Personnel Safety

46 5. Alternate Water Source Bulk water provided by certified water haulers or neighboring utilities Bottled Water Interconnect with nearby utilities Water Pumped from surface water sources Water from unaffected wells owned by citizens/business Consider the amount of water needed to address short-term & and long-term 46 ** Included in Priority Measures Plan** ERP: 8 Core Elements

47 Maintain an Updated Inventory of: Current equipment (i.e. Pumps) Repair Parts Chemical supplies for normal maintenance and operations 47 ERP: 8 Core Elements 6. Replacement Equipment & Chemicals

48 Protecting the facilities, equipment, and vital records is essential to restoring operations in the aftermath of an incident. “Lock Down” procedures Access control procedures Establishing a security perimeter following a major incident Evidence protection measures for law enforcement Securing buildings against forced entry 48 ERP: 8 Core Elements 7. Property Protection

49 Identify and address special water sampling & monitoring issues that may arise during and after a major incident Laboratory Contact List Emergency Water Sample Collection Kit Identify proper sampling and monitoring procedures for an unknown contaminant, as well as a variety of known contaminants Obtain sample containers Determine quantity of required samples 49 ERP: 8 Core Elements Water Sampling & Monitoring

50 Identify/Coordinate with 1 st Responders & Other Partners Who Will Assist During a Major Incident 50 Local Health Dept.Law Enf.Fire Dept.Local Gov.LEPCPower Utility State DECTroopersMediaLaboratoriesEm. SvcsMutual Aid Federal FBIFEMADHS

51 When Coordinating with Partners, Remember ….. The Terms “Emergency Response Plan” & “Vulnerability Assessment” mean different things to different people Specification is Imperative! 51

52 Don’t Assume That Those Responding to Your Emergency “Know” Your System You may know your system well enough, but responders may not. You may be relying on other parties during an incident. You will need documentation readily available. 52

53 Now What? 53 ERP Updates Staff Training Table Top Exercises Functional Exercises Full Scale Drills

54 Action Plans AKA Rip n’ Run Plans or Response Guidelines Tailored ERPs that address specific major incidents One or two pages to cover specific response information (overall plan should be in place) A document that can be detached and taken to the field by the ER Lead. Should include: Any special notification requirements Special response steps to be taken upon ERP activation Recovery actions to bring the PWS back into operation 54

55 55

56 Tools and Resources Federal Agencies State Agencies Mutual Aid Agreements 56

57 57 Personal Preparedness

58 Federal Tools/Resources Incident Command System (ICS) training ICS-100.Pwa Introduction to the Incident Command System for Public Works Personnel Common framework that emergency response and management community uses 58

59 More Federal Resources CDC Emergency Response LEPC Database Effective Risk and Crisis Communication during Water Security Emergencies 59

60 Vulnerability Self Assessment Tool (VSAT) New version; software can be easily downloaded 60

61 WHEAT 61 Software can be easily downloaded Think numbers & $$

62 62 EPA Response Protocol Toolbox

63 EPA Tabletop Exercise Tool (TTX Tool) 63 Contains various disaster scenarios concerning water systems

64 Water Contaminant Information Tool (WCIT) Register for access to online database Online database containing information on upwards of 100 contaminants that pose a serious threat if introduced to a drinking water system Provides quick access to vital information including treatment recommendations & system decontamination processes As a planning tool, supports: VAs, ERPs, & Action Plans 64

65 FREE Water ISAC Pro Trial Subscription $500 value 65 https://portal.waterisac.org/web/

66 National Weather Service River Forecast Center 66

67 State Tools/Resources Drinking Water Program Public Water Systems Security and Emergency Preparedness webpage CD and/or onsite VA/ERP assistance 67 ADEC Security Website:

68 68 ADEC Drinking Water Program’s Emergency Response Toolkit

69 69

70 A network of “Utilities Helping Utilities” united by the common threat of natural and manmade disaster AKWARN Intrastate program organizing water/wastewater utilities via a non- binding agreement to provide rapid, short-term deployment of emergency services to recover from disasters 70 Mutual Aid Agreements

71 71

72 CoWARN – Alamosa, Colorado Provided personnel, technical expertise, equipment and supplies within hours 23 water and wastewater utilities, industry support organizations, and State of Nebraska assisted Tracked donations of supplies/assistance from private businesses in network

73 73

74 AWWA’s WARN Website mNumber=3837&navItemNumber= AWWMA’s WARN Website

75 Sponsored by Dept. Homeland Security & Emergency Management Provides a forum for the public and private sectors to share information and develop strategy for continuity of services including energy, medical services, and other vital sectors. Meets monthly You can join remotely 75 Alaska Partnership for Infrastructure Protection (APIP)

76 Summary How drinking water directly contributes to overall public health in an emergency How drinking water systems can prevent, prepare for, and recover from natural disasters and human-caused incidents Understand proposed emergency preparedness regulation changes that may affect your system How drinking water directly contributes to overall public health in an emergency How drinking water systems can prevent, prepare for, and recover from natural disasters and human-caused incidents Understand proposed emergency preparedness regulation changes that may affect your system 76

77 77 ? ? ?

78 78 Tyler Fanning Public Water Systems Security Specialist Division of Environmental Health Drinking Water Program (907)


Download ppt "Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation Sustained Compliance for Public Water Systems, Chapter 2 Workshop Anchorage, Alaska Sept. 30, 2011 Tyler."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google