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School Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports March 28, 2011 PBIS Informational Forum.

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Presentation on theme: "School Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports March 28, 2011 PBIS Informational Forum."— Presentation transcript:

1 School Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports March 28, 2011 PBIS Informational Forum

2 Schools adopting PBIS Framework National Data 13,331 Schools

3 SWPBIS in 13,331 schools Iowa Illinois Iowa

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5 Findings (Horner, et al) SWPBIS is possible (at all grade levels) SWPBIS is associated with:  20-60% reduction in problem behavior  Increases in academic performance  Improved perception of school safety  Improved self-assessment of faculty effectiveness

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12 Schools adopting SW-PBIS by year in Northwest AEA

13 Schools Using SW-PBIS Framework as their Discipline System Longfellow Elementary (Sioux City) Akron-Westfield Elementary Akron-Westfield MS West Sioux Elementary West Sioux MS Boyden-Hull Elementary South O’Brien Elementary South O’Brien Junior High Smith Elementary (Sioux City) Sacred Heart Elementary (Sioux City) Unity Elementary (Sioux City) Gehlen Catholic (LeMars) Hinton Elementary Lark Elementary (West Monona School District) Central Elementary (West Monona School District)

14 Northwest AEA SET Scores:

15 School-Wide Evaluation Tool (SET)

16 Northwest AEA: Triangle Summary – Majors Only (0-1 Ref) 3.26 (2-5 Ref).84 (6 + Ref)

17 Informational Forum (9:30 to 10:30) Roundtables  Involving Families/Community (Room D)  Creative Lesson Plans (Room D)  Acknowledgements for Upper Elementary/Middle School (Room D)  Continuous Regeneration (Room F) Learning More about PBIS (Room C)

18 Informational Forum (10:45-11:45) Question/Answer with PBIS Panel (Room C) Making Sense of Tier III Interventions (Room D)

19 Informational Forum (11:45) I will be in Room D to answer questions

20 SW-PBIS - What does it look like? Define behavioral expectations Teach behavioral expectations Monitor and reward appropriate behavior Provide corrective consequences for problem behaviors. Use collected data to solve problems and make decisions.

21 Define School-Wide Expectations for Behavior Identify 3-5 Expectations Short statements Positive Statements (what to do, not what to avoid doing) Memorable

22 R espect O ptimistic Attitude A ctive Learner R esponsibility South O’Brien Junior High

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24 Akron Westfield Middle School Double RPK Respectful Responsible Prepared Kind

25 Akron-Westfield

26 West Sioux Middle School Perseverance Respect Integrity Discipline Excellance

27 Expectations & behavioral skills are taught & recognized in natural context

28 Longfellow Elementary SPOT Pledge I will Show respect for myself and others I will choose a Positive attitude I will take Ownership for my actions I will always Try my best

29 On-going Monitoring and Acknowledging of Appropriate Behavior Create a system to support frequent acknowledgement acknowledgement of appropriate behavior. System to make acknowledgement easy and simple Different strategies for acknowledging appropriate behavior (small frequent rewards more effective) Often multiple methods of acknowledgement

30 Akron-Westfield Name: _______________Class___________ Respectful Responsible Prepared Kind !

31 Name: _______________Class___________ Respectful Responsible Prepared Kind You have been caught by a GUEST TEACHER!

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33 Consistent Corrective Consequences Problem Behaviors Do not ignore problem behavior Provide clear guidelines for what is handled in class versus sent to the office Corrective Consequences include logical punishment and penalties for misbehavior Do not relay on negative consequences to change chronic behavior patterns

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35 Progressive Consequence Systems

36 Emphasis on Natural Consequences LOVE AND LOGIC

37 Use of data Using data to make decisions and solve problems Use of data to determination implementation integrity

38 Office Discipline Referrals Data shared frequently with all staff - presented visually for easy interpretation Behavior tracking should be simple  very little teacher time to fill out Consistency across school staff  Clear, mutually exclusive, exhaustive definitions  Distinction between office v. classroom managed

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46 Data to Determine Implementation Integrity Self-Assessment School-Wide Evaluation Tool Team Checklist

47 SET Evaluation (School Wide Evaluation Tool) Fall 2007

48 Does Implementation of SW-PBS Work?

49 Yes… When implemented with integrity  Office referrals decrease  Time students engaged in instruction increases  Building staff report less need to improve discipline systems  Some research that suggests increases in reading proficiency

50 Office Discipline Referrals - Majors (Referrals/100 students)

51 Office Discipline Referrals - Minors (Referrals/100 students)

52 Office Discipline Referrals - Majors (Referrals/100 students)

53 Office Discipline Referrals - Minors (Referrals/100 students)

54 Office Discipline Referrals - Majors (Referrals/100 students)

55 Office Discipline Referrals - Minors (Referrals/100 students)

56 Office Discipline Referrals - Majors (Referrals/100 students)

57 Office Discipline Referrals - Minors (Referrals/100 students)

58 State Average (4th) State Average (8th)

59 State Average (4th) State Average (8th)

60 State Average (4th-Low SES) State Average (8th-Low SES)

61 State Average (4th-Low SES) State Average (8th-Low SES)

62 School-Wide Systems Common language, vision, experience Involving all students, all staff, & all settings.

63 Non-Classroom Systems Defined as particular times or places where supervision is emphasized (e.g., hallways, cafeteria, playground, bus).

64 Classroom Systems Instructional settings in which teacher(s) supervise & teach groups of students.

65 Individual Support Systems Specific supports for students who engage in chronic problem behaviors (1%-7% of enrollment).

66 Middle 15 (no) 7 (yes)Elementary 38 (no) 31 (yes)

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68 N =23N = 8 N = 23 N = 8

69 Academic SystemsBehavioral Systems 1-5% 5-10% 80-90% Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based High Intensity Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based Intense, durable procedures Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Universal Interventions All students Preventive, proactive Universal Interventions All settings, all students Preventive, proactive Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success

70 References Educational Psychology, Vol. 25, Nos. 2/3, March/June 2005 “Whole-School Positive Behaviour Support: Effects on student discipline problems and academic performance” James K. Luisell*, Robert F. Putnam, Marcie W. Handler, and Adam B. Feinberg Psychology in the Schools, Vol. 43(6), 2006 “The relationship of School- Wide Positive Behavior Support to academic achievement in an urban middle school.” Stephen R. Lassen, Michael M. Steele, and Wayne Sailor Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports Newsletter (“Academic Achievement and the Implementation of School-wide Behavior Support.” January, 2006 Robert F. Putnam May InstituteRobert H. Horner University of Oregon; Robert Algozzine University of North Carolina at Charlotte

71 Academic SystemsBehavioral Systems 1-5% 5-10% 80-90% Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based High Intensity Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based Intense, durable procedures Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Universal Interventions All students Preventive, proactive Universal Interventions All settings, all students Preventive, proactive Designing School-Wide Systems for Student Success

72 THREE-YEAR SW-PBS PLAN YEAR 1YEAR 2YEAR 3 Become familiar with data information system (SWIS/BID) as it relates to PBS Attend four one-day trainings during school year Attend two to three one-day trainings during school year Attend two-day summer trainingTeach/Re-teach lessons as needed Child Study team will begin to integrate individual Functional Behavior Assessments Attend two/three one-day trainings during school year Building staff will integrate information from PBS Classroom System Package Develop flow chart/referralBuilding staff will integrate information from PBS Targeted Intervention System Package Develop expectations Develop matrix Develop rewards system Develop lesson plans Teach/Re-teach lessons as needed

73 Questions

74 Jerome Schaefer at


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