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Free to Be How does learning history through literature differ from learning through informational text?

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Presentation on theme: "Free to Be How does learning history through literature differ from learning through informational text?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Free to Be How does learning history through literature differ from learning through informational text?

2 Monday, October 17 1. What are the properties of an information text such as an encyclopedia or history book? 2. What are the properties of a historical fiction book, such as Bud, Not Buddy? 3. Which would you say you prefer? Why?

3 Monday, October 17 Essential Question: How does learning history through literature differ from learning through informational text? Which would you say you prefer? Why? Write your answer in complete sentences.

4 This week’s vocabulary: 1. Flaccid- lacking vigor or force; yielding to pressure 2. Autocrat- a person with unlimited influence and authority 3. Formidable- menacing, causing fear or awe 4. Venerable- worthy of respect as a result of great age, wisdom, remarkable achievements, or similar qualities 5. Sluggard- a person who is lazy

5 What do you think these soldiers talked about the day before this scene? How do you think they felt as they anticipated this battle?

6 Ray Bradbury’s “The Drummer Boy of Shiloh” Literature pg.439

7 Quick Check 1. Why can’t the drummer boy sleep at the beginning of the story? 2. What does Joby think the men in the army are whispering to each other and to themselves? 3. How does Joby recognize the General? 4. What advice does the General give to Joby? 5. How does Joby feel at the end of the story?

8 Active Reading As you read “The Drummer Boy of Shiloh,” imagine yourself as either Joby or the General. How would you respond to the General’s comments if you were Joby? If you were the General, would you encourage Joby to continue into battle or to reconsider? Use the chart below to write down what you, as the character, would say or think about the other. JobyThe General Reactions/Comments to the GeneralReactions/Comments to Joby

9 Evaluating 1. Why does Joby cry? Does his reason for crying make sense to you? Explain your answer. 2. Why did the General cry the night before the battle? 3. Is it surprising that the General cried before the battle? What is your opinion of him? 4. Author Ray Bradbury provides a detailed description of the setting of the story. Does his description help you better understand the story? Explain.

10 Tuesday, October 18 Write the sentences using the correct form of the verb. 1. The students (is/are) going to class. 2. I (is/am) learning about verbs. 3. We (was/were) on fall break. 4. He (was/were) having a good time. 5. She (is/are) having more fun with verbs!

11 Simple Forms: Present and Past Tenses Present tense- names an action that is occurring now or that occurs regularly or expresses a general truth. ** Remember that a verb must agree in number with its subject.** Examples: I walk to class. A great actor wins awards.

12 Simple Past tense- names an action that already happened. ** The past tense of many verbs is formed by adding –ed to the verb.** Example: The students learned about verbs.

13 Progressive: Present and Past Forms Present Progressive- names an action or condition that is continuing in the present ** The present Progressive form of a verb consists of the present participle of the main verb and a form of be, such as am, is, are** Examples: The students are finishing their work. I am finishing my work.

14 Past Progressive- names an action or condition that continued for some time in the past. ** The past progressive form of a verb consists of the present participle and the helping verb was or were. Examples: We were reading. She was listening.

15 Perfect Tense: Present and Past Present Perfect: names an action that happened at an indefinite time in the past. It also tells about an action that happened in the past and is still happening now. ** The present perfect tense consists of the helping verb has or have and the past participle of the main verb.** Examples: The actor has rehearsed for many hours. George and Mary have seen the play seven times.

16 Past Perfect- names an action that took place before another action or event in the past. **The past perfect tense of a verb consists of the helping verb had and the past participle of the main verb.** Examples: The game had started. The teams had scored six points each.

17 Verb Tense Rap Do it, I’m doing it, I have done it Past, present, and future, without it I’m done with Sit back as RRR presents This knowledge which could be common sense It’s verb tenses

18 Homework :::: due Thursday! Simple Tense …. pg. 409 Progressive Tense …. pg. 413 Perfect Tense …. pg. 415

19 Wednesday, October 19 List 5-10 things you learned about the Civil War through the reading of “The Drummer Boy of Shiloh.” Discuss how this relates to our Essential Question: How does learning history through literature differ from learning through informational text?

20 Wednesday, October 19 Personal Response: Would you have been encouraged or more fearful after listening to the General’s words?

21 Vocabulary con’t 6. Unobtrusive- not readily noticeable, inconspicuous 7. Protuberant- the state of being bulging beyond the surrounding area; protrusion 8. Mundane- ordinary, commonplace 9. Abated- to reduce in intensity or amount 10. Innumerable- too many to be numbered

22 Thursday, October 20 Rewrite each sentence using correct subject/verb agreement. Label the tense of each verb. 1. Molly and I (plan/plans) a trip every year. 2. We (was/were) thinking about Florida. 3. We (has/have) gone there three years in a row.

23 Friday, October 21 Create a poem by writing “FREE TO BE” vertically and adding a word or phrase horizontally that expresses what it means (to you) to be free. F R E T O B E


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