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Planning An Instructional Unit. The Big Idea InstructionalObjectives.

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Presentation on theme: "Planning An Instructional Unit. The Big Idea InstructionalObjectives."— Presentation transcript:

1 Planning An Instructional Unit

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3 The Big Idea InstructionalObjectives

4 As you listen to the song, examine the details of the painting and complete the art analysis worksheet.

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6 Norman Rockwell

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8 Civil Rights Movement With courage and determination, With courage and determination, ordinary people made our country a better place to live.

9 Other Considerations How much time do you have to devote to this unit? How much time do you have to devote to this unit? How much do your students already know about the topics you will cover? How much do your students already know about the topics you will cover? How can you make this topic relevant to the world today? How can you make this topic relevant to the world today? What skills do your students need to learn? What skills do your students need to learn?

10 Important Content to Include Topics You will Cover in this Unit Topics You will Cover in this Unit List Key Concepts & Vocabulary List Key Concepts & Vocabulary Reading, Writing, & Math Activities Reading, Writing, & Math Activities Student Performance Activity Student Performance Activity

11 What resources are available? Handouts & Worksheets Handouts & Worksheets Mapping Activities Mapping Activities A/V Materials: Film, Music, Art, Photographs A/V Materials: Film, Music, Art, Photographs Internet Resources Internet Resources Primary Source Documents Primary Source Documents

12 How will you measure student learning? Tests & Quizzes for this Unit Tests & Quizzes for this Unit Projects for this Unit Projects for this Unit Homework Assignments Homework Assignments Can all students demonstrate what they have learned?

13 How will your students know what you expect of them?

14 Class: Hour:Name: Last Unit:Current Unit:Next Unit: Read: Key Concepts =========== Essential Questions: Unit Calendar

15 Class: World History Hour: Name: Last Unit: Age of Absolutism Enlightenment Next Unit: Age of Revolution Unit Calendar Read: Ch. 20: TH/1/ 19  Test-Absolutism  V-Amadeus M/1/23  Intro to Unit  V-Amadeus Key Concepts ========= Enlightenment Philosophy Scientific Revolution W/1/25  V-Amadeus  L- Astronomy  G-Galileo F/1/27  Ch. 20 Terms Due  V-Newton  L-Scientific Rev. T/1/31  Quiz Ch 20 Terms  R-Rousseau &  Wollstonecraft.  L& A-Philosophers Essential Questions:  How did the scientific method improve scientific research?  How does the scientific revolution change our understanding o f the human body, the physical world, and the universe?  How did the writings of the Philosophes change people’s expectations of their relationship with society and government?  How did classical music develop?  How did the enlightenment challenge Christianity? TH/2/2  L-C/E Enlightenment  MM-Salon &  Classical Music  Unit Review M/2/6  Test The Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment opened a new door of thought and action throughout the world. SciencePhilosophy Astronomy Chemistry Physics Religious Political Social

16 Unit Name Kansas state standards Terms: Define in Notebook & Know for Quiz People: Places: Events: Ideas:

17 Enlightenment Enlightenment  Explains essential concepts from the Scientific Revolution o the heliocentric theory o scientific method  Explains essential concepts from the Enlightenment that represented a turning point in intellectual history o Thomas Hobbes o John Locke o Voltaire o Montesquieu o Mary Wollstonecraft o Jean Jacques Rousseau o Enlightened despotism o Salons ID Items:Heliocentric theory* 20-1 Scientific method 20-1 Natural law 20-2 Natural Rights 20-2 Copernicus 20-1 Newton 20-1 Thomas Hobbes 20-2 Locke 20-2 Voltaire 20-3 Wollstonecraft 20-3 Montesquieu 20-3 Rousseau 20-3 Enlightened Despotism 20-3 Terms: Define in Notebook & Know for Quiz People: Copernicus20-1 Galileo 20-1 Isaac Newton 20-1 Francis Bacon 20-1 Thomas Hobbes 20-2 John Locke 20-2 Montesquieu 20-3 Voltaire 20-3 Rousseau 20-3 Mary Wollstonecraft 20-3 Wolfgang Mozart 20-3 Immanuel Kant 20-3 Haydn 20-3 Places: London 20 Paris 20 Vienna 20 Salon 20-3 Events:  Scientific Revolution 20-1  The Enlightenment 20-3 Ideas: Deism 20-2 Enlightened despotism 20-3 Scientific method 20-1 Natural Rights 20-2 Heliocentric theory 20-1 The Scientific Revolution & Enlightenment opened a new door of thought and action throughout the world.

18 What concepts do your students need to understand? Concepts are vocabulary that can be applied across subject areas. Concepts are vocabulary that can be applied across subject areas. They are critical to your students understanding of the real world: They are critical to your students understanding of the real world: What is economics? What is economics? What is the difference between a Republican and a Democrat? What is the difference between a Republican and a Democrat? What is a coup d’etat? What is a coup d’etat?

19 What instructional methods will you use? Teacher Led Lecture/PowerPoint Lecture/PowerPoint Discussion/Analysis Discussion/Analysis Shared Reading Shared Reading Audio/Visual Audio/Visual Student Centered Cooperative Learning Activity Cooperative Learning Activity Student Presentations Student Presentations Student Research Student Research Simulations Simulations Skill Work Skill Work Student Led Discussions Student Led Discussions Build on Teacher & Student Strengths!

20 Characteristics of Effective Discussion Focus on an interpretable text, issue, idea, etc. Focus on an interpretable text, issue, idea, etc. The facilitator and participants have prepared thoroughly. The facilitator and participants have prepared thoroughly. Most of the talk comes from the participants, not the facilitator. Most of the talk comes from the participants, not the facilitator. There is enough time spent on a particular idea to explore it thoroughly before going to another point. There is enough time spent on a particular idea to explore it thoroughly before going to another point. Participants feel comfortable, but there is still meaningful argument. Participants feel comfortable, but there is still meaningful argument. Many people talk. Many people talk. Participants and facilitator ask authentic questions and refer to previous points made in the discussion. Participants and facilitator ask authentic questions and refer to previous points made in the discussion.

21 Student Centered Discussion Socratic Circles Socratic Circles Reading Pods Reading Pods Fish Bowl Debates Fish Bowl Debates Use reading strategy to improve student comprehension Use reading strategy to improve student comprehension Stress student use of factual detail to support viewpoint. Stress student use of factual detail to support viewpoint. Provide students with guidelines & feedback. Provide students with guidelines & feedback.

22 Working with Primary Sources Music Music Photographs Photographs Cartoon Analysis Cartoon Analysis

23 Political Cartoons

24 Projects Website

25 Are there any questions?


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