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1The Internet, Fourth Edition-- Illustrated The Internet – Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Unit A Understanding Internet Basics.

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Presentation on theme: "1The Internet, Fourth Edition-- Illustrated The Internet – Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Unit A Understanding Internet Basics."— Presentation transcript:

1 1The Internet, Fourth Edition-- Illustrated The Internet – Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Unit A Understanding Internet Basics

2 2 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition U n i t O b j e c t i v e s Explore uses for the Internet Understand networks Understand network connectors Learn the origins of the Internet

3 3 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition U n i t O b j e c t i v e s Understand the growth of the Internet Understand how the World Wide Web works Connect to the Internet Evaluate Internet service options

4 4 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Explore Uses for the Internet The Internet is used for:   Obtaining information   Communicating and IMs   Buying and selling goods and services   Downloading Software   Accessing multimedia   Playing online games

5 5 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Three types of electronic discussion groups:   Mailing lists Send to members   Newsgroups See Google Groups   Blogs See kottke.org and blogger.com Explore Uses for the Internet

6 6 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition A network is two or more computers connected to each other.   A computer becomes part of a network by connecting to a nearby computer or to the Internet.   Networks allow computers to share resources. Understand Networks “Internet”—the worldwide connection of interconnected networks “internet”—any interconnected network (network of networks)

7 7 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Understand Networks A client/server LAN

8 8 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Understand Network Connectors Computers are connected using:   twisted-pair cables   coaxial cables   fiber-optic cables   wireless connections

9 9 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Understand Network Connectors

10 10 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Learn the Origins of the Internet 1960s   The DOD created DARPA to examine ways to connect its computers to one another and to weapons installations all over the world.   DARPA created the first network, ARPANET, in   ARPANET was four computers networked together.

11 11 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Learn the Origins of the Internet

12 12 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Clues to Use The transfer protocol is the set of rules that computers use to move files from one computer to another on an internet. HTTP is the most common transfer protocol used on the Internet. File transfer protocol (FTP) and the Telnet protocol are also still used.

13 13 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Understand the Growth of the Internet 1980s   Firms used PCs to construct intranets.   Businesses used commercial services to communicate with firms outside their intranets.   Larger firms built TCP/IP-based WANs and leased telephone lines to connect their intranets.   In 1989, the NSF permitted MCI Mail and CompuServe to allow their subscribers to exchange s with members of the academic and research communities who were connected to the Internet.

14 14 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Understand the Growth of the Internet 1990s   In 1991, the NSF began implementing plans to privatize much of the Internet via Internet hosts.   In 1995, the FNC adopted the formal definition of the Internet A global network using TCP/IP

15 15 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Understand the Growth of the Internet By 2005, the number of Internet hosts had grown to over 300 million.

16 16 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Clues to Use No one knows how many users are on the Internet.   The Internet has no central management or coordination.   Routing computers do not maintain records of the data packets they handle. It is estimated that:   at least 300 million host computers are connected to the Internet;   and more than 700 million people worldwide use it.

17 17 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Understand How the World Wide Web Works “The Web” and “the Internet” are not the same thing. The Internet is the entire system of networked computers. The World Wide Web is a method used to access information contained on a subset of those networked computers. You connect to the Internet, and then use the World Wide Web to access information.

18 18 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Connect to the Internet To connect to the Internet, individuals and businesses must set up an account with an Internet Service Provider (ISP). ISPs provide access to a NAP.

19 19 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Connect to the Internet

20 20 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Connect to the Internet Types of connections to the Internet:   telephone service connection (POTS or plain old telephone service)   T1 and T3 line connections   Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)   cable   satellite   wireless

21 21 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Connect to the Internet Modem   Short for modulator-demodulator   Converts signals between a computer (uses digital signals) and a twisted-pair or coaxial cable transmission line (uses analog signals)   Modulation—converting a digital signal to an analog signal   Demodulation—converting that analog signal back into digital form Cable modem   required for a cable connection through a cable television company DSL modem   required for a DSL connection

22 22 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Connect to the Internet To connect a device to the Internet without cables, you need a wireless network interface card (WLAN card) or a Wi-Fi compatible device. You also must be within range of a wireless access point that is connected to the Internet. Some public locations provide wireless access points for free or for a small fee.

23 23 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Evaluate Internet Service Options Ways of connecting to the Internet:   school or employer connection   telephone line connection   cable connection   satellite connection   hot spots

24 24 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Evaluate Internet Service Options Select an ISP: 1. 1.What is the monthly base fee and how many hours of Internet service are included? 2. 2.What is the hourly rate for time used over the monthly base amount? 3. 3.Is the telephone access number local or long distance? 4. 4.Which specific Internet services are included? 5. 5.What software is included? 6. 6.What user-support services are available?

25 25 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Internet Basics Include: Exploring uses for the Internet Understanding networks Understanding network connectors Learning the origins of the Internet   Clues to use: Transfer protocol

26 26 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Internet Basics Include (cont.): Understanding the growth of the Internet   Clues to use: Number of Internet users Understanding how the World Wide Web works Connecting to the Internet Evaluating Internet service options

27 27 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Terms to Use Internet:   a collection of computers all over the world that are connected to one another World Wide Web:   a subset of the Internet Web pages:   documents formatted to be viewed on the Web Web site:   a collection of related Web pages stored on a computer

28 28 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Terms to Use   electronic messages transferred between two or more computers Instant messages (IM):   messages exchanged over the Internet in real time

29 29 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Server:   any computer that accepts requests from other computers connected to it and shares its resources with those connected computersClient:   a computer connected to a server Client/server network:   a network consisting of one server and multiple clients LAN (Local Area Network)   a network of computers that are physically close to each other WAN (Wide Area Network)   a network of LANs Terms to Use

30 30 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Terms to Use Network operating system:   the software that runs on the server and coordinates the flow of information among its various clients Network interface card (NIC):   a removable circuit board used to connect a computer to a network by attaching a cable from the NIC to the server or to another client

31 31 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Terms to Use Packet switching Packet switching:   a method of sending information that breaks down files and messages into data packetsTCP/IP   Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) includes rules that computers on a network use to establish and break connections   Internet Protocol (IP) includes rules for routing individual data packets Open architecture philosophy   each network connected to the Internet can use its own protocols and data-transmission methods internally Network access points (NAPs)   physical locations where networks connect to the Internet

32 32 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Terms to Use Intranets:   LANs or WANs that use the TCP/IP protocol but do not connect to sites outside the firm Internet hosts:   computers that connect a LAN or a WAN to the Internet

33 33 The Internet—Illustrated Introductory, Fourth Edition Terms to Use Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)   a computer language that marks text with a set of tags, or codes, that define the structure and behavior of a Web page Web server:   a computer that stores files written in HTML and lets other computers connect to it and read those files Web browser:   software that reads HTML documents and moves from one HTML document to anotherLinks:   text, graphics, or other Web page elements that connect to additional data on the Web site you are currently exploring or on a Web site halfway around the world


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