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© 2014 E 3 Alliance Susan Dawson, President Laura Koenig, School Readiness Director Shawn Thomas, Director of Research & Policy Erin Russell, Central Texas.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2014 E 3 Alliance Susan Dawson, President Laura Koenig, School Readiness Director Shawn Thomas, Director of Research & Policy Erin Russell, Central Texas."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Susan Dawson, President Laura Koenig, School Readiness Director Shawn Thomas, Director of Research & Policy Erin Russell, Central Texas Team Show Me the Data! From Research to Practice to People Presented by

2 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Erin Russell Central Texas Programs Michael & Susan Dell Foundation 2

3 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Our Director of Communications Would Tell Us To: Find more information: Share thoughts with others: Facebook:

4 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Why Are We Here? At the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation, we use metrics-based methodologies and analysis to identify where our resources can produce both immediate results and long-term systemic changes in education. We have developed a very effective partnership with E 3 Alliance to do this in Central Texas. We want others to be a part of it — not just here but around the state and country! 4

5 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Webinar Goals 1.Share our excitement about supporting education systems change 2.Demonstrate real-world applications of action research to drive systems change in education 3.Identify partners who can:  Scale  Incubate  Leverage Services 5

6 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Webinar Format: 1)Intro to E3 Alliance Theory of Change 2)How E3 Turns Information into Systemic Change a)Kindergarten Readiness b)3D Growth Model c)College Access and Success 3)Wynn Rosser, Greater Texas Foundation 4)Wrap Up 6

7 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Susan Dawson President E3 Alliance 7

8 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Central Texas High” SeniorClass “Central Texas High” Senior Class 157 Students 157 Students © 2014 E 3 Alliance 8

9 Central Texas High” Freshman Class “Central Texas High” Freshman Class 314 Students 9

10 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Central Texas High” SeniorClass “Central Texas High” Senior Class 157 Students X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X ? X X X X X X ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?? ? ? ? ? ? 120? Students © 2014 E 3 Alliance 10

11 © 2014 E 3 Alliance E 3 Alliance uses objective data and focused community collaboration to align our education systems so all students succeed and lead Central Texas to economic prosperity Mission E 3 Alliance is a Catalyst For Educational Change in Central Texas 11

12 © 2014 E 3 Alliance What We Don’t Do Run school programs Provide direct services Write curriculum Make decisions that school boards or leaders make for their districts Instead, we are a catalyst for positive change in education 12

13 © 2014 E 3 Alliance E 3 Alliance Model for Change Using Information to Change Practice Building Community Will for Change Bridging disconnects; Overcoming barriers; Aligning resources and practices 13

14 © 2014 E 3 Alliance From Information to Action Identify Data Insights Change Practices & Build Capacity Forge Collaborations Build Common Agenda Convene Stakeholders Building Community Creating Commitment to Change Sustaining a Culture of High Performance Objective Data-Driven Decision Making Change Systems

15 © 2014 E 3 Alliance E3 Alliance Mission, Theory of Change, Approach to Systemic Alignment 15

16 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Shawn Thomas Research & Policy Director E3 Alliance 16

17 © 2014 E 3 Alliance From Information to Action Identify Data Insights Change Practices & Build Capacity Forge Collaborations Build Common Agenda Convene Stakeholders Building Community Creating Commitment to Change Sustaining a Culture of High Performance Objective Data-Driven Decision Making Change Systems Using objective data and research to drive systems change – how does it work?

18 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Using Objective Data to Drive Systems Change – What Does that Mean? Making readily available aggregate data more accessible & understandable 18

19 © 2014 E 3 Alliance 19 © E 3 Alliance, 2014 Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of Texas Education Agency AEIS data Central Texas Income Distribution by School District 10 Years Ago…

20 © 2014 E 3 Alliance …And District Income Distribution Last Year 20 Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of Texas Education Agency TAPR data © E 3 Alliance, 2014

21 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Making readily available aggregate data more accessible & understandable Comparing and trending data over time Using Objective Data to Drive Systems Change – What Does that Mean? 21

22 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Low Income Graduation Rates Improving Faster Than Other Regions Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 22

23 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Making readily available aggregate data more accessible & understandable Comparing and trending data over time Explaining complex or obscure data – White Papers: how to interpret dropouts Using Objective Data to Drive Systems Change – What Does that Mean? 23

24 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Pop Quiz: Cost of Drop Outs A conservative estimate of the cost in lost income to Central Texas of one class of dropouts is: A: Trump Tower building cost B: The annual cost of deer crashes in Pennsylvania C: The total investment in the Long Center for Performing Arts D: Annual budget of the UT Athletics Department 24

25 © 2014 E 3 Alliance A conservative estimate of the cost in lost income to Central Texas of one class of drop outs is: Deer crashes in Pennsylvania cost over $400M each year. Answer B. is correct $ 450 million We could buy FIVE Long Centers for each class year of dropouts! or we could buy 4 UT Athletics Departments. The Trump Tower cost a paltry $300M. 25

26 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Making readily available aggregate data more accessible & understandable Comparing and trending data over time Explaining complex or obscure data o White Papers: how to interpret dropouts Predictive early warning analysis for better decision making Using Objective Data to Drive Systems Change – What Does that Mean? 26

27 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Half of Low Income Students Who Miss 20 or More Days While in Grade 9 Graduated on Time Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 27

28 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Making readily available aggregate data more accessible & understandable Comparing and trending data over time Explaining complex or obscure data – White Papers: how to interpret dropouts Predictive early warning analysis for better decision making Longitudinal research using individual student records Education Research Centers (ERCs) Using Objective Data to Drive Systems Change – What Does that Mean? 28

29 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Making readily available aggregate data more accessible & understandable Comparing and trending data over time Explaining complex or obscure data – White Papers: how to interpret dropouts Predictive early warning analysis for better decision making Longitudinal research using individual student records Education Research Centers (ERCs) Original research (when necessary) – Most comprehensive study on student readiness for kindergarten in the state Using Objective Data to Drive Systems Change – What Does that Mean? 29

30 © 2014 E 3 Alliance How we approach using data to drive systems change Making data accessible for decision-making 30

31 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Laura Koenig School Readiness Director E3 Alliance 31

32 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Ok, but how does it work in real life? 32

33 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Increasing School Readiness Example 1: 33

34 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Understanding School Readiness Defining Readiness Measuring School Readiness Factors Associated with Readiness  Poverty  Prior Experience Increasing School Readiness 34

35 © 2014 E 3 Alliance What is Readiness?  Higher test scores  Improved social skills  Better classroom behavior  Less grade repetition  Fewer special ed placements  Greater graduation rates  Increased productivity  Reduced crime 35 What does Readiness look like at age 5? How do you measure it?

36 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Building a Common Definition of Readiness 36

37 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Ready, Set, K! Students Teachers Families

38 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Measuring Readiness 38

39 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Just Over Half of Central Texas Students Are Ready to Succeed in School Source: E3 Analysis of Ready, Set, K! weighted data 39

40 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Saw Dramatic Increase in Child Poverty Source: Kids Count Data Center, Central Texas: Bastrop, Blanco, Caldwell, Gillespie, Hays, Travis and Williamson Counties 40

41 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Saw Dramatic Increase in Child Poverty Source: Kids Count Data Center, Central Texas: Bastrop, Blanco, Caldwell, Gillespie, Hays, Travis and Williamson Counties 41

42 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Saw Dramatic Increase in Child Poverty Source: Kids Count Data Center, Central Texas: Bastrop, Blanco, Caldwell, Gillespie, Hays, Travis and Williamson Counties 42

43 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Any Pre-K Better Than No Pre-K For Both Low and Non-Low Income Students E3 Analysis of Ready,Set,K! weighted data 43

44 © 2014 E 3 Alliance 3 out of 4 Low Income Children Attend District Pre-K 44 E3 Analysis of Ready,Set,K! weighted data , Central Texas Low IncomeNon-Low Income

45 © 2014 E 3 Alliance What are We Doing About it? Align Systems Build Capacity Increase Quality 45

46 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Align Systems National League of Cities effort to align early childhood efforts  Austin one of 6 cities in the nation School Readiness Action Plan  Government, non-profit, and community agents working toward common goals, measured by Ready, Set, K! E3 Alliance and Education Service Center Region 13 aligning Pre-K instruction through Ready, Set, K! Horizontal Alignment with Child Care programs using Ready, Set, K! 46

47 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Build Capacity Enroll all Eligible 4 Year Olds in High Quality Pre-K  About 1,800 students, or 12% of those eligible throughout the region, are not enrolled in Pre-K  Lifetime ROI of enrolling those students in high quality Pre- K: $30M per cohort Leverage available state dollars to build capacity to serve eligible 3 year olds  Open classrooms where facility space available  Partner with private centers to serve full day  Impact investing in new models to build infrastructure  Longitudinal research to optimize investments and outcomes 47

48 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Increase Quality Using Ready, Set, K!  Kindergarten Readiness Study  Pre-K Programs and Child Care Centers  Parent Guides and tools Changing School District Practices  More Qualified Teachers  More investment in Pre-K 48

49 © 2014 E 3 Alliance From Information to Action Aligning Pre-K instruction to meet school expectation Increasing the use and capacity of our current systems Changing district practices based on data Using objective data and clear ROI, districts and community are collaborating to increase enrollment regionally—and saving millions by doing so! 49

50 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Population data to identify leverage points for change New standard, original research—only when necessary Aligning community systems and capacity based on objective data 50

51 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Improving Student & School Performance by Measuring Academic Growth Example 2: 51

52 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Learning=Growth Why Study Growth?

53 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Why Study Growth? Current measures pose a number of problems Growth analyses provide:  a more direct measure of learning  a more equitable basis for comparing schools that serve different student populations Growth analyses allow us to:  Locate schools with practices that are promising because students are learning, not just meeting the minimum standard  View performance multi-dimensionally 53

54 © 2014 E 3 Alliance SGP Has Advantages & Disadvantages AdvantagesDisadvantages Method used in at least 15 states and accepted by teacher unions Not used in TEA TPM or “simple growth” method, but goal is to have wide district use by Opens up new dimension of discussion on what is an “excellent school” Requires extensive analysis on data from all students in Texas, which E3 Alliance has! Not affected by only helping “bubble” students Time lag: data becomes available a year after test administration Easily handles TAKS to STAAR change Not used for teacher compliance: meant to improve performance at school and student subpopulation level Very high year-to-year stability Only utilizes academic performance in core subjects Methodology is open, nonproprietary, & relatively easy to understand Schools get credit for students at ceiling 54

55 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Strong Negative Relationship Between % Low Income and % Met TAKS Standard 55 R 2 =.57 Percent Low Income Percent Met TAKS Standard NOTE: Includes 2011 TAKS Reading/ELA Passing Rates for all Central Texas schools, excluding alternative and residential treatment campuses © E 3 Alliance, 2014

56 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Reduced Correlation Between 3D Growth Scores and % Low Income 56 R 2 =.24 Percent Low Income 3D Growth Score NOTE: Includes 2011 SGP Growth Scores for all Central Texas schools, excluding alternative and residential treatment campuses © E 3 Alliance, 2014

57 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Example 3D Growth Bubble Chart State Average Low Growth Average Growth High Growth 57 © E 3 Alliance, 2014 School A School B

58 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Insert Tech Brief Chart here 58 Identifying Opportunities to Learn and Improve 58 © E 3 Alliance, 2014

59 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Campus Name Student Growth % Met Reading Growth Grade 4 Growth Grade 5 School %3858 School %4359 School %3548 School %4661 School %4555 School %3355 School %3842 School %3556 School %3147 School %4043 School %5547 Example of a District Policy Issue District Policy Issue 59

60 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Growth in Math – Middle Schools Normal Growth High Growth Low Growth 60 © E 3 Alliance, 2014

61 © 2014 E 3 Alliance From Information to Action Existing district/state measures often inadequate to improve practice and policy Tools exist that can help drive performance improvements at a campus and district level Not a silver bullet, but a powerful tool in the toolbox 61

62 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Adapting powerful tools to measure student outcomes Supporting district actions to change policy and practice to improvement performance 62

63 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Improving College Enrollment and Success Example 3: 63

64 © 2014 E 3 Alliance No Improvement in Proportion of High School Graduates Enrolling in Higher Ed Institutions 64 Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation and higher education enrollment data at the UT Austin ERC

65 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Enrollment Rates for Low Income HS Grads Increased Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation and higher education enrollment data at the UT Austin ERC 65

66 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Higher Ed Enrollment for Low Income Students Increased But Still Lags Behind Texas Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation and higher education enrollment data at the UT Austin ERC 66

67 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Majority of Low Income Graduates Enrolled In Higher Ed Attend 2-Year Colleges Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation and higher education enrollment data at the UT Austin ERC 67

68 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Only 1 in 5 Students at Austin Community College Attends School Full-time 68 Source: THECB: 2013 Texas Public Higher Education Almanac; IPEDS

69 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Gap Between Low Income and Non-low Income High School Grads Increases in College 69

70 © 2014 E 3 Alliance What are We Doing About it? Creating a Community of Practice Connectivity Between Systems to build Capacity for Supporting Students 70

71 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Creating a Community of Practice Sharing practices across college access/success providers—Austin College Access Network (ACAN) Improving data sharing for common students:  FERPA-compliant data-sharing agreements between IHE’s and community groups who are directly supporting ACAN students  Developing early warning system for struggling students to deepen services and supports Researching Pathways of Promise to identify which clusters and course patterns best prepare most challenged student to be successful in college and high demand careers 71

72 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Connectivity Between Systems Providing professional development for HS and college counselors in access and persistence targeted at groups of need Leveraging research, aligning policies and practices to put many more students on Pathways of Promise Implementing “near to peer” mentoring by students who have successfully navigated the 2- 4 year transfer process 72

73 © 2014 E 3 Alliance From Information to Action Central Texas low income students lag the state in graduation rates and college enrollment rates Enrollment rates for low income students are increasing, overall enrollment is flat and completion is flat E3 Alliance targeting specific interventions and supports to help this population succeed with a credential that leads to a viable career 73

74 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Trends in higher education enrollment and success Creating a community of practice to improve outcomes, especially for low income students Connecting systems to enable change 74

75 © 2014 E 3 Alliance From Information to Action Identify Data Insights Change Practices & Build Capacity Forge Collaborations Build Common Agenda Convene Stakeholders Building Community Creating Commitment to Change Sustaining a Culture of High Performance Objective Data-Driven Decision Making Change Systems

76 © 2014 E 3 Alliance The Bottom Line on Using Data to Change Practices & Systems Detailed analysis tied to real need enables effective policy and practice decisions Understanding leverage points helps communities and leaders allocate resources cost effectively Using data insights to craft a common agenda allows different sectors to come together to deliver on systems change  Move from Information to Action 76

77 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Another Perspective Wynn Rosser Executive Director Greater Texas Foundation 77

78 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Using data to drive change Measuring School Readiness 3D Growth to improve student & school performance College enrollment and success 78

79 © 2014 E 3 Alliance We’re investing in E3 Alliance because it’s the only real example we’ve seen of a backbone organization using action research to enable change—at scale—across sectors 79

80 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Why Invest in E3 Alliance? 1.E3 Alliance has built and tested a theory of change in education that has been implemented over the last 8 years—proven results in practice 2.This is a model that can be replicated and leveraged across the state and country…and is already having statewide impact today 3.This region’s massive demographic shift is a reflection of what is to come for the rest of the country—solving problems here provides a model for other regions 80

81 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Could your Organization? Scale Invest in supporting and scaling this model for change Incubate Leverage models and practices in this region to replicate to other parts of the state or country Leverage Services Use the experience and expertise of E3 staff to address your challenges with action research 81

82 © 2014 E 3 Alliance Opportunities Going Forward? Susan Dawson Laura Shawn Virginia 82

83 © 2014 E 3 Alliance The conclusions of this research do not necessarily reflect the opinions or official position of the Texas Education Agency, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, or the State of Texas.


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