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Plagiarism : do we have a blind spot? Sonia Morin Plagiarism Conference June 23 rd, 2010 Plagiarism : do we have a blind spot? Sonia Morin Plagiarism Conference.

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Presentation on theme: "Plagiarism : do we have a blind spot? Sonia Morin Plagiarism Conference June 23 rd, 2010 Plagiarism : do we have a blind spot? Sonia Morin Plagiarism Conference."— Presentation transcript:

1 Plagiarism : do we have a blind spot? Sonia Morin Plagiarism Conference June 23 rd, 2010 Plagiarism : do we have a blind spot? Sonia Morin Plagiarism Conference June 23 rd, / autreyu (2005)

2 Orientation document Reading Reacting Survey Workshop Institutional strategy Newcastle 2

3 General information Undergraduates : Graduates : Faculty & lecturers : PROGRAMS Undergraduate : 110 Graduate :

4 The workshop Photo : Michel Caron Putting an end to plagiarism 1- Plagiarism : an academic disease? 2 - Winning conditions Catherine Vallières, conseillère pédagogique Sonia Morin, coordonnatrice, Appui aux études supérieures Putting an end to plagiarism 1- Plagiarism : an academic disease? 2 - Winning conditions Catherine Vallières, conseillère pédagogique Sonia Morin, coordonnatrice, Appui aux études supérieures 4

5 5 Cheating Inadvertance Academic Fraud Crime (Copyright) Ethics Stealing Education Technics Morality Plagiarism : Taking credit for someone elso work or claiming original work… Plagiarism : Taking credit for someone elso work or claiming original work… BLUM, Susan D., My Word! Plagiarism and college culture. Cornell University Press, p.

6 6

7 gregory2012 gregory % of year old students use a computer to do their assignments. 97% of students use the Internet as a documentary source 75% do not give references. 80% of students admit to cutting & pasting information from the Internet. 29% of university students make a systematic use of a computer in the classroom. PERREAULT, N., Portrait et enjeux du plagiat électronique dans les universités québécoises. Dans le cadre de l'atelier "Le plagiat dans les universités québécoises à l'ère du numérique" edn. Canada: Profetic. Behaviours with Internet 7

8 New information age 8

9 Ignorance or miseducation Confusion about how to cite sources The social acceptance of cheating Lack of knowledge or misconception of copyright, intellectual property or public domain Why they say they cheat > Administrators’ responsibility 9

10 Careless note taking Pressure to get good grades, competition or fear of failure Students as “natural economizers” Poor time management and organizational skills The thrill of rule-breaking The culture of downloading and sharing > Students’ responsibility 10

11 Education as a commodity Assignments seen as pointless or trivial > Teachers’ responsibility 11

12 Lack of research and information literacy skills 12 > Teachers’ responsibility

13 Lack of confidence in writing ability > Teachers’ responsibility 13

14 SURVEY InvitedRespondents(%) Undergraduates11,9031,077(9,0%) Graduates5,580515(9,2%) Faculty & lecturers4,042535(13,2%) TOTAL21,5252,127(9,9%) Michel Polico 12 plagiarism situations 9 slogans 14

15 15 Student Z was late in writing his term paper. He bought one on a paper mill and handed it in.  Undergraduate  Course-based Masters  Research-based Masters  PhD Handing in an assignment written by a friend with the friend’s permission.

16 16 Faculty using his research student’s graph without giving credit to her or her work.  Undergraduate  Course-based Masters  Research-based Masters  PhD

17 17 As part of a research team, Students E & F are expected to exchange ideas as freely as possible. While tweeting with the team, Student E expressed a brilliant idea. Some months later, he finds out that Student F has used this brilliant idea in his doctoral scholarship application. Student F was awarded the scholarship for his doctoral research based on Student E’s idea.  Undergraduate  Course-based Masters  Research-based Masters  PhD

18 18 One of Faculty K’s students handed her out such a good paper that she decided to put it in the textbook she gives out at the beginning of each semester as an example of what she expects her students to do. She rendered student’s paper anonymous.  Undergraduate  Course-based Masters  Research-based Masters  PhD

19 19 In his doctoral scholarship application, Student D used the pronoun WE in his project description. His project will be based on a theoretical model developed by his supervisor and he described it as OUR model. FL  Undergraduate  Course-based Masters  Research-based Masters  PhD

20 20 In his thesis, Alex copied-pasted part of his literature review without using the quotation marks but always giving the name of the authors. The rest of his thesis presents his research work and the conclusion is his as well.  Undergraduate  Course-based Masters  Research-based Masters  PhD

21 21 Student B went to a foreign university for 6 months in order to use a specialized piece of equipment from a lab pertaining to Professor Eureka. Student B needed that equipment to validate part of her research data. As Professor Eureka was on a sabbatical leave when Student B was in his lab, she did her validations under the supervision and with the assistance of a postdoctoral fellow. The results they obtained were publishable material. When they were ready to submit the paper, Professor Eureka required that his name be put on the paper as an author.  Undergraduate  Course-based Masters  Research-based Masters  PhD

22 22 M & N wrote a scientific paper and submitted it to a first editor. Three months later, having not received an answer, they submitted their paper to another editor, who published it immediately. Months later, they received news from the first editor, who was inclined to publish the paper if some modifications were done. M& N answered positively and the paper was published by the first editor. Neither M nor N mentioned that a version of the paper had been published earlier. FL  Undergraduate  Course-based Masters  Research-based Masters  PhD

23 THREATENING Beware of plagiarism! It's easy it's tempting... but it can be very costly. (University of Ottawa) At UQAM, it is zero tolerance! (Université du Québec à Montréal) Do you have anything to confess? (Université de Sherbrooke) PRAISING VALUES Integrity for true success. (Université de Montréal) Be honest! Take pride in your own work! (Concordia University) Integrity is the essence of everything successful. (Ryerson University) Truth in Education (University of Alberta) Honesty in Academics (University of Calgary) 23

24 BLUM, Susan D., My Word! Plagiarism and college culture. Cornell University Press, p. CHAMINADE, B., March 25, 2009, La génération facebook.: [ ]http://www.generationy20.com/la-generation-facebook Wordle 24

25 Age Gender F M Population U G FL 25

26 26 bookish in north park :

27 Thank you!


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