Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

CJ © 2011 Cengage Learning Chapter 1 Criminal Justice Today.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "CJ © 2011 Cengage Learning Chapter 1 Criminal Justice Today."— Presentation transcript:

1 CJ © 2011 Cengage Learning Chapter 1 Criminal Justice Today

2 Learning Outcomes LO1:Define crime and identify the different types of crime. LO2:Outline the three levels of law enforcement. LO3:List the essential elements of the corrections system. LO4:Explain the difference between the formal and informal criminal justice processes. LO5:Contrast the crime control and due process models. © 2011 Cengage Learning

3 1 LO © 2011 Cengage Learning Define crime and identify the different types of crime.

4 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 What is crime? – “a wrong against society proclaimed by law and, if committed under certain circumstances, punishable by society.” Different societies can have vastly different ideas of what constitutes a crime.

5 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 The Consensus Model – Assumes that a diverse group of people have similar morals and share an ideal of what is “right” and “wrong.” – Crime are acts that violate this shared value system and are deemed harmful to society.

6 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 The Conflict Model – Assumes that society is so diverse that members do not share moral attitudes. – The most politically powerful members of society have the most influence on criminal law and impose their value system on the rest of the community. – Crimes are defined by whichever group holds power at a given time.

7 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 An Integrated Definition of Crime – Punishable under criminal law, as determined by the majority, or in some cases, by a powerful minority. – Considered an offense against society as a whole and prosecuted by public officials, not by victims and their relatives or friends. – Punishable by statutorily determined sanctions that bring about the loss of personal freedom or life.

8 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 Criminal behavior can be grouped into six categories: – Violent crime – Property crime – Public order crime – White collar crime – Organized crime – High-tech crime

9 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 Violent Crime – Crimes against persons. – D our perspectives on crime. – Includes: Murder Sexual assault Assault and battery Robbery

10 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 Property Crime – The most common form of criminal activity. – The goal of the offender is some form of economic gain or to damage property. – Includes: Larceny/theft Burglary Motor vehicle theft Arson

11 © 2011 Cengage Learning ABC Video: Cape Cod Murder

12 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 Public Order Crimes – Behavior that is outlawed because it violates shared social values. – Also referred to as victimless crime. – Includes: Public drunkenness Prostitution Gambling Illicit drug use

13 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 White Collar Crime – Business related offenses. – Illegal act(s) committed to obtain personal or business advantage. – White collar crime costs U.S. businesses as much as $994 billion a year.

14 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 Organized Crime – Illegal acts by illegal organizations (often violent. – Usually geared toward satisfying a public demand for unlawful goods and services. – Implies a conspiratorial and illegal relationship among a number of people engaged in unlawful acts. – Includes: Loan sharking Gambling Prostitution

15 © 2011 Cengage Learning ABC Video: US Tyco

16 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 High-Tech Crime – Also referred to as cyber crimes. – Includes: Selling pornographic material online Cyberstalking Hacking

17 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 The Criminal Justice System The interlocking network of law enforcement agencies, courts, and corrections institutions designed to enforce criminal laws.

18 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 1 The Purpose of the Criminal Justice System – To control crime – To prevent crime – To provide and maintain justice

19 © 2011 Cengage Learning The Structure of the Criminal Justice System Federalism – government powers are shared by the national government and the states.

20 © 2011 Cengage Learning ABC Video: Internet Crime

21 2 LO © 2011 Cengage Learning Outline the three levels of law enforcement.

22 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 2 Local and County – County sheriff – chief law enforcement officer of most counties. – Responsible for the “nuts and bolts”: Investigations Patrol activities Keeping the peace

23 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 2 State – State police – Highway patrols – Fire marshals – Fish, game, wildcraft wardens Federal – Anti-terrorism – FBI – Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives – Almost every federal agency has some kind of police power.

24 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 2 Courts – The US has a dual court system – two independent judicial systems, one at federal level and one at state level. – Criminal court responsible for determining guilt or innocence of suspects.

25 3 LO © 2011 Cengage Learning List the essential elements of the corrections system.

26 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 3 The Corrections systems includes: – Probation – Jails – Community-based corrections (halfway houses, residential centers, work- release centers).

27 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 3 The Corrections systems includes: – Probation – Jails – Community-based corrections (halfway houses, residential centers, work- release centers).

28 4 LO © 2011 Cengage Learning Explain the difference between the formal and informal criminal justice processes.

29 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 4 The Formal Criminal Justice Process – Functions as an assembly-line – “a series of routinized operations whose success is gauged primarily by their tendency to pass the case along to a successful conclusion.”

30 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 4 The informal criminal justice process –Based on the use of discretion – the authority to choose between and among alternative courses of action.

31 © 2011 Cengage Learning The Wedding Cake Model

32 5 LO © 2011 Cengage Learning Contrast the crime control and due process models.

33 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 5 The crime control model – Law enforcement is necessary to control criminal activity. – Control is difficult and probably impossible. – The system must be quick and efficient. – Police are in a better position than courts to determine guilt.

34 © 2011 Cengage Learning Learning Outcome 5 The due process model – Strives to make it difficult to prove guilt. – Ultimate goal – fairness, not efficiency. – Rejects idea of a criminal justice system with unlimited powers. – Criminal justice system should recognize its own fallibility. – Relies heavily on courts.

35 © 2011 Cengage Learning Mastering Concepts Crime Control Model versus Due Process Model

36 © 2011 Cengage Learning ABC Video: Crime In America

37 © 2011 Cengage Learning Sources: Bureau of Justice Statistics, Correctional Populations in the United States, 1995 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Justice, June 1997), Table 1.1, page 12; and Bureau of Justice Statistics, Prisoners in 2008 (Washington, D.C.; U.S. Department of Justice, 2009), 2.


Download ppt "CJ © 2011 Cengage Learning Chapter 1 Criminal Justice Today."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google