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DIRECTORATE GENERAL CIVIL DEFENCE MAINSTREAMING DISASTER RISK REDUCTION IN CIVIL DEFENCE 14 October 2011.

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Presentation on theme: "DIRECTORATE GENERAL CIVIL DEFENCE MAINSTREAMING DISASTER RISK REDUCTION IN CIVIL DEFENCE 14 October 2011."— Presentation transcript:

1 DIRECTORATE GENERAL CIVIL DEFENCE MAINSTREAMING DISASTER RISK REDUCTION IN CIVIL DEFENCE 14 October 2011

2 Civil Defence Act, 1968 Amended Vide Notification Dated 22 Jan 2010” “Civil Defence” includes any measures, not amounting to actual combat, for affording protection to any person, property, place or thing in India or any part of the territory thereof against any hostile attack, whether from Air, Land, Sea or other places, or, for depriving any such attack of the whole or part of its effect, whether such measures are taken before, during, at or after the time of such attack, or, any measures taken for the purpose of Disaster Management, before, during, or after any Disaster.

3 SALIENT FEATURES – CIVIL DEFENCE ACT 1968 The Act come into Force on 24 th May 1968 in the whole of India. (Act consists of Four Chapters) Chapter I defines Civil Defence, Civil Defence Corps, Hostile Attack, Notification, Personal Service Injury and State Govt. Chapter II elaborates the powers of Central Govt. to make Rules for Civil Defence giving out various actions to be taken for CD measures. Chapter III deliberates on – Constitution of CD Corps – Appointment of Members and Officers – Dismissal of Members – Functions of Members – Power of Central Govt to make Regulations Chapter IV deals with provisions of personnel injuries Act to apply to injuries sustained by members and powers of delegation to State Govts

4 CD ORGANISATION : STATE LEVEL 225 Towns of 35 States/UTs Notified as CD Towns, only 130 activated Each Town has Nucleus of four Permanent Staff along with 400 CD Volunteers (@ per 2 Lakh Population) Each State one CD Training Institute - Permanent Staff 36 personnel + 5 Vehicles and Equipment Controller for CD Towns - District Magistrate CD Volunteers : Target Strength - 13 Lakh Present Strength - 5.59 Lakh

5 10/9/11 MAINSTREAMING ADAPTATION THROUGH DISASTER RISK REDUCTION “While we cannot do away with natural hazards, we can eliminate those we cause, minimize those we exacerbate, and reduce our vulnerability to most. Doing this requires healthy and resilient communities and ecosystems. Viewed in this light, disaster mitigation is clearly part of a broader strategy of sustainable development-making communities and nations socially, economically, and ecologically sustainable.” - J. Abramovitz

6 Broadly, mainstreaming DRR is referred to as the integration of disaster risk reduction measures into development planning, poverty reduction strategy, as well as resource management and environmental protection. – To mainstream is to upstream – To mainstream is to change the way we deal With natural hazards (to see it as ‘norms’ rather than exceptions) – To mainstream is to take natural disaster risk reduction as matter of development – And the most fundamental of all, is to understand the dynamic nature of vulnerability and its underlying causes; and to make vulnerability reduction as the central focus. MAINSTREAMING DISASTER RISK REDUCTION:- WHAT DOSE IT MEAN?

7  Worsening global impact of natural disasters’ impact globally – particularly uneven pattern  Linkage between development and disaster has become increasingly clear  Promise of the vulnerability and resilience concepts, which underlie the shift and allow it to be ‘framed’ FACTORS DRIVING THE SHIFT

8 Hazards Vulnerability Natural science Integrated natural/social sciences + humanities Single discipline Interdisciplinary Relief & recovery Prevention & mitigation Call for integrated disaster management, living with natural disasters, mainstreaming DRR KEY ELEMENTS OF THE PARADIGM SHIFT IN DRR

9 Climate change Impacts Development Programs Resource Policies Adaptations Disaster Management Livelihoods Poverty Reduction Vulnerability MAINSTREAMING VULNERABILITY & CLIMATE CHANGE INTO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PLANNING

10  Prevention and mitigation “do pay”, but are never “politically attractive”  It could erase decades of “development gain”  Rapidly emerging economies: to build for or avoiding the next big catastrophe?  Implementation remain the weakest link despite general progress of human societies Act of god’ Human and Nature interaction Coupled Social-Ecological Systems (SES) DISASTER IS A MATTER OF DEVELOPMENT

11  The conceptual advances represented by the vulnerability/resilience-based approach to DRR has not been matched by an empirical/operational one.  Therefore, we are at a stage where we know the practices are inadequate, but we do not yet have the conceptual tools, political will, and methodologies to meaningfully implement new approaches ‘BEAUTY’ IS ALSO THE ‘BEAST’: THE CHALLENGES STEM PRECISELY FROM THE PROMISES

12 Permissible institutional structure – Iinstitutional structure for natural disaster management today is still in large a reflection of the re-active and techno-fix mode; – Lack of Inter-, and multi- sectoral integration – Lack of Incentive structure (e.g. Insurance) – The role of international donor agencies Natural hazard is still largely seen as ‘exception’ rather than ‘norm’. Limited participation by local communities in the decision making process witch lead to the development of un-supported policy and institutional frameworks CHALLENGES FOR MAINSTREAMING

13 10/9/11 COMMUNITY The definition of community in this context refers to a social group, which has a number of things in common, such as shared experience, locality, culture, heritage etc.

14 10/9/11 CHALLENGES AND PRIORITIES People have to understand and accept that they also have a responsibility towards their own survival – it is not simply a matter for governments to find and provide solutions. Transfer of expertise at a local level, e.g. early warning systems and procedures suited to small-scale requirements. Transfer of local experiences, and their thematic application within various communities have to be developed.

15 10/9/11 RISK REDUCTION MEASURES Most successful when they involve the direct participation of the people most likely to be exposed to hazards, in the planning, decision-making, and operational activities at all levels of responsibility Local leaders, drawn from political, social and economic sectors of society need to assume a primary responsibility for the protection of their own community.

16 10/9/11 THE ESSENTIAL ROLE OF COMMUNITY ACTION As a result, it is not surprising that emergency relief assistance far exceeds resources invested to develop local disaster risk reduction capabilities First, communities must be aware of the importance of disaster reduction for their own well- being. It then becomes necessary to identify and impart essential skills that can translate risk awareness into concrete practices of sustained risk management. Such an approach needs to develop activities that can strengthen communities’ capacities to identify and cope with hazards, and more broadly to improve residents’ livelihoods

17 10/9/11 ENGAGING THE COMMUNITY “Much has been learnt from the creative disaster prevention efforts of poor communities in developing countries. Prevention policy is too important to be left to governments and international agencies alone. To succeed, it must also engage civil society, the private sector and the media.” Kofi Annan, IDNDR Programme forum, Geneva, July 1999

18 10/9/11 RISK REDUCTION MEASURES The involvement of local residents in protecting their own resources is possible and can work – if sufficient attention and investment is devoted to the subject.

19 10/9/11 THE ESSENTIAL ROLE OF COMMUNITY ACTION Disaster reduction is most effective at the community level where specific local needs can be met. When used alone, government and institutional interventions often prove to be insufficient and frequently are seen to be sporadic and only responding to crises. A top=down approach is inclined to ignore local perceptions and needs and the potential value of local resources and capacities in the process.

20 SUGGEST ACTIVITIES FOR MAINSTREAMING D.R.R. IN CD  Acknowledge that true first responder will be community.  Exploit the large CD Volunteer Force for :- Educating public in Disaster Management. Provide limited life saving support during/after disaster. Prepare Grounds and provide information to Specialised Forces for R&R acting as a spring board Saving time. Assist Specialised Forces in their Operations.

21 BENEFITS OF INTEGRATING CIVIL DEFENCE IN DISASTER MANAGEMENT A LARGE NO. OF TRAINED VOLUNTEERS WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR RESCUE AND RELIEF OPERATIONS DURING/AFTER DISASTER LARGE SALARIED FORCES CANNOT BE WANT. VOLUNTEERS AVAILABLE WOULD BE VIDELY SPREAD AMONGST THE PUBLIC. HARDLY ANY REACTION TIME WOULD BE WASTED IN COMMENCEMENT OF RESCUE OPERATIONS. BASIC RESCUE OPERATION EQUIPMENT & MEDICAL FIRST AID WOULD BE AVAILABLE IN SHORTEST TIME IN EACH DISTRICT. BEING FROM THE LOCAL POPULATION WILL RESULT IN MORE FAITH IN CD VOLUNTEERS AND DEDICATION OF VOLUNTEERS TO WORK FOR OWN PEOPLE. LOCAL LANGUAGE AND KNOWLEDGE OF HABITS OF LOCAL POPULATION AS WELL AS TEERRAIN WILL BE OF GREAT HELP. WILL BE ABLE TO WORK AS A SPRINGBOARD FOR SPECIALISED RESCUE & RELIEF FORCES ON THEIR ARRIVAL. CAN MAKE UP IN SHORTFALL OF MANPOWER OF SPECIALISED FORCES BY TAKING OVER GENERALISED DUTIES/TASKS OF THESE FORCES. CAN ASSISTS IN OVERCOMING PANIC AND HELP LOCAL POLICE IN LAW AND ORDER DUTIES/CROWD CONTROL.

22 PROBLEMS FACED (a) Poor Staffing of CD Institutes – Lack of permanent Staff. (b) Lack of CD Staff at District Level. (c) Paucity of Funds. (d) Low Morale. (e) No Recognition of Volunteer Service. (f) Grossly inadequate Daily Training Allowance.

23 SCHEME EVOLUTION YearActivity. 2000:After Kargil war - GoM recommended Revamping of CD Set up in the Country. 2001:HPC under Chairmanship of Sh. J.C. Pant recommended involvement of CD in Disaster Management. :Secretary BM Committee set up in pursuance of GoM recommendations further recommended Revamping of CD Set up and to provide Disaster Management Skills to CD personnel. 05 Jan 2006:During meeting to examine Secretary BM Committee’s Report, Hon’ble Home Minister Sh. Shivraj Patil desired that CD strengthening of CD and widening scope to include Disaster Management. 07 Feb 2006:HPC constituted under chairmanship of Sh. K.M. Singh to review functioning of CD Set up in country and suggest changes to include Disaster Management. Dec 2006:HPC suggested revamping of CD at an outlay of 398.67 Crore. Apr 2008:Home Minister’s CD Advisory Committee Meeting - Hon’ble Defence Minister Sh. A.K. Antony and Hon’ble Home Minister Sh. Shivraj Patil appreciated the proposed Scheme as a good beginning and suggested increase in outlay over a period of time Apr 2009:Scheme for Revamping CD Set up sanctioned at initial outlay of 100 Crore during current plan period ending March 2012 Oct 2009:First budgetary allocation ( 15 Crore) for Scheme made to DGCD

24 Strengthen and Revitalise CD set up in the Country so as to :- Play Significant Role in Disaster Management. Assist Police in Internal Security and Law & Order Situations while retaining Primary Role. SCHEME OBJECTIVE

25 Activity QtyScaleTotal Amount ( ` in Lakh) Remarks Existing CDTIs - Upgradation 17 States106 Lakhs Each  Phy Infra – 60  Equipment– 35  Transport - 11 1802Transport : LUV - 7.0 L (With Boat Tlr) QRT Veh - 3.5 L Motor Cycle - 0.5 L New CDTIs – Fully Equipped 09 States192 Lakhs Each  Phy Infra – 146  Equipment– 35  Transport - 11 1920Land by State Govt. Transport : Same as for existing CDTI Multi Hazard Prone Districts 100 Districts in 16 States 45 Lakhs/District  Phy Infra – 14  Equipment– 20  Transport - 11 4500Transport : Same as for existing CDTI Pilot Project 40 Towns in20 StatesLumpsum325 Training Camps/ Exercises/ Demo 30 StatesLumpsum550 Publicity and Awareness 30 StatesLumpsum300 Re-orientation : Town Centric – Distt. Centric 100 Districts in 16 States 4 Lakh/District400 Hiring Transport 30 States28 Project Management DGCDLumpsum50DGCD, MHA Monitoring & Evaluation DGCDLumpsum125 Total10000 SCHEME COMPONENTS/ACTIVITIES

26 CAPACITY BUILDING – CIVIL DEFENCE FOR DRR  Large No’s of CD Volunteers weeded out & new Enrolled.  New CD Institutes being Created and equipped in Ten States.  Existing CD Institutes being renovated and equipped in 17 States.  NCDC – Modernised and additional Infrastructure Created.  100 Districts notified as Multi-Hazard Districts. Infrastructure being created and States Equipped.  Training Camps/Exercises/ Demonstrations carried out by States.  Wide publicity organised.

27 10/9/11 CHALLENGES AND PRIORITIES People have to understand and accept that they also have a responsibility towards their own survival – it is not simply a matter for governments to find and provide solutions. Transfer of expertise at a local level, e.g. early warning systems and procedures suited to small-scale requirements. Transfer of local experiences, and their thematic application within various communities have to be developed.

28 10/9/11 CHALLENGES AND PRIORITIES Better communication is required among authorities and managers, and among community leaders for this purpose. Existing grass-roots and community- based organizations at community level, including women organizations, should be reinforced, for them to take action and participate on disaster risk reduction activities.

29  Training infrastructure in all States/UTs  Provide transport and equipment for all training institutes  Make CD district centric and have administrative infrastructure as well as limited disaster management capability in all 626 districts in the country  Train and utilise CD volunteers for internal security, law & order and enhancement of capability to deal with disasters.  Integrate CD organisation with NCC,NSS,NYKS  Enhance the central share (re-imbursement) for CD expenditure by states  Enhance duty / training allowance of CD volunteers  Substantial progress to bring 1% population of the country under the folds of civil defence (2ND admn reforms commission) FUTURE PLANS

30 SUGGESTED ACTIONS  Shri K.M. Singh report recommendations be implemented.  Filling up of all Existing Vacancy of Permanent Staff.  Declaring all 642 Districts as CD Districts.  Creation of Physical Infrastructure and Equiping all Districts (Costal Districts on Priority).  Realistic Funding by the Central Government.  Recognition of Volunteer Service.  Increase in Central Share for Civil Defence.

31  The paradigm shift is still in its early stage – so we need ‘accumulation’ of tools, methodology, cases…  Stakeholder-engaged participatory process is essential for this ‘accumulation’ plus ‘translation’  Mainstreaming, after all, is about good governance. Political will is critical.  The best way forward is to form close tie to national and international agenda on various programmers  Include community participation CONCLUDING REMARKS

32 T Thank you

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