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Phonological Awareness Created by Brenda Wright For GESD #40 July 2005 Zgonc, Y. (2000). Sounds in action. Crystal Springs Books. (ISBN # 1884548326) Literacy.

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Presentation on theme: "Phonological Awareness Created by Brenda Wright For GESD #40 July 2005 Zgonc, Y. (2000). Sounds in action. Crystal Springs Books. (ISBN # 1884548326) Literacy."— Presentation transcript:

1 Phonological Awareness Created by Brenda Wright For GESD #40 July 2005 Zgonc, Y. (2000). Sounds in action. Crystal Springs Books. (ISBN # 1884548326) Literacy First Process Professional Development Institute, Inc. © 2001

2 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright2 Phonological Awareness Table of Contents RationaleSlide #3Slide #3 Academic Learning TimeSlide #4Slide #4 Phonological Awareness (PA)Slide #5Slide #5 Skill SequenceSlide #6Slide #6 Mastery LevelsSlide #8Slide #8 Administering AssessmentsSlide #9Slide #9 Matching Assessment to InstructionSlide #12Slide #12 Guidelines for Effective PA TrainingSlide #13Slide #13 Resources for PA InstructionSlide #14Slide #14 ResourceSlide #17Slide #17

3 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright3 Rationale  A comprehensive reading process needs to include formative assessment and systematic, explicit instruction in the following areas: Phonological Awareness, Phonics, Spelling, Vocabulary, Comprehension Skills, Strategic Reading Tools, and Metacognitive Process.  Teachers need to be continually diagnosing students’ strengths and weaknesses and prescribing instruction that is at the correct Zone of Proximal Development.  Teacher knowledge and implementation of the reading process will make the difference for students. © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.1-1) TOC

4 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright4 Academic Learning Time  This is the amount of time your students are SUCCESSFULLY “engaged” in the lesson objective. There are 3 critical attributes to academic learning time. 1.Students know and understand the lesson objective. 2.Students are actively manipulating the content of the lesson objective. 3.Students are experiencing at least a 75% success rate as they manipulate the content. *At risk students must experience at least a 95% success rate.  All 3 of these critical attributes must be present if academic learning time is to occur. © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.1-15) TOC

5 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright5 Phonological Awareness Phonological awareness is the understanding that our spoken language can be broken down into parts or individual sounds that can be manipulated. C oncept of Spoken Word R hyme P honemes S yllables P honeme Manipulation Phonemic awareness involves the ability to manipulate the individual units of sounds and phonemes in words. Examples include recognizing initial, medial, and final sounds in words; the ability to manipulate sounds such as adding, substituting, and transposing sounds. Phonemic awareness fits under the phonological awareness sequence. © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.2-5) TOC

6 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright6 Skill Sequence 1.Concept of Spoken Word a.Distinguish words in a sentence 2.Rhyme a.Recognize a rhyme b.Complete a rhyme (not assessed) c.Produce a rhyme 3.Syllable a.Blend syllables b.Segment syllables c.Delete syllables TOC

7 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright7 Skill Sequence 4.Phoneme a.Blend onsets and rimes b.Blend phonemes c.Segment phonemes d.Delete initial phoneme e.Delete final phoneme 5.Phoneme Manipulation a.Add phonemes b.Delete phonemes: First sound in blend c.Substitute phoneme TOC

8 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright8 Mastery Levels Skill Typically Mastered Concept of Spoken WordPreschool RhymeKindergarten SyllableKindergarten Phoneme1 st Grade Phoneme Manipulation2 nd Grade TOC

9 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright9 Administering the Assessments  Talk in a normal conversation speed and a natural conversation voice.  You should assess every student.  Consider the grade level of the child when administering portions of the test.  Administer the test until the child reaches a frustration level ~ miss 3 out of 6, stop. *However, use your judgment. Some children get stuck on rhyme but can do syllable blending without any problem. © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.2-17) TOC

10 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright10 Administering the Assessments cont.  1 st time tested ~ start at the beginning. 2 nd time and thereafter ~ begin at the section where they will have a success rate of at least 5 out of 6 and go from there.  To be successful, a student needs to master at least 5 out of 6 in each section, but compare the grade level of the child with the grade level at which a skill is typically mastered.  The assessment should typically take 10-15 minutes to administer the entire assessment. It can be administered in 2 separate sittings. © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.2-18) TOC

11 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright11 Administering the Assessments cont.  The first assessment should be administered in August and then at every benchmark assessment. You may want to assess different individual sections periodically to make informed decisions to drive instruction.  It is not necessary to repeat the section of the test where the child scored 5 out of 6 or 100% mastery. Each time the assessment is given again, start at the point where the child made more than 1 error out of 6. © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.2-18/19) TOC

12 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright12 Matching Assessment to Instruction Assessment results must be used in order to make informed decisions about instruction. Instructional activities should reflect the students’ progress along the Phonological Awareness Skill Sequence. Results of formal and informal assessment will determine specific choices of activities. Appropriate Phonological Awareness activities reflect an awareness of multiple intelligences theory.multiple intelligences © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.2-31) TOC

13 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright13 Guidelines for Effective Phonological Awareness Training 1.Are activities focused on sounds and not focused on letter-sound relationships? 2.Is you choice of PA activities based on the results of student assessment? 3.Do you students recognize the pictures used in the activities? 4.Are instructions clear? Do you model the activity? 5.Are the students actively participating in the activity? 6.Do the activities include some physical activity? 7.Does your instruction meet the criteria for Academic Learning Time? PA = Phonological Awareness © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.2-34) TOC

14 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright14 Resources for PA Lessons PA SkillResource Book Title Concept of Spoken Word Sounds in Action Classrooms that Work (2 nd Edition) Rhyme Sounds in Action Recognition & Phonics A to Z Production PA in Young Children Words Their Way (2 nd Edition) PA: Playing with Sounds to Strengthen Beginning Reading Phonics They Use, 3 rd Edition PA = Phonological Awareness © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.2-11-15) TOC

15 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright15 Resources for PA Lessons PA SkillResource Book Title Syllables: Sounds in Action Blending & PA in Young Children Segmentation PA: Playing with Sounds to Strengthen Beginning Reading Isolation of Sounds in Action Initial & Final Sound Phonics A to Z PA in Young Children Words Their Way (2 nd Edition) PA: Playing with Sounds to Strengthen Beginning Reading PA = Phonological Awareness © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.2-11-15) TOC

16 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright16 Resources for PA Lessons PA SkillResource Book Title Blending & Segmenting Sounds in Action Phonics A to Z PA in Young Children PA: Playing with Sounds to Strengthen Beginning Reading Deletion Sounds in Action Substituting & Phonics A to Z Manipulating Phonics A to Z PA in Young Children PA: Playing with Sounds to Strengthen Beginning Reading PA = Phonological Awareness © 2001 Literacy First Process; Literacy First Process Primary Teacher’s Manual by Professional Development Institute, Inc. (p.2-11-15) TOC

17 copyright 2005 Brenda Wright17 Resource TOC


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