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Rebuilding Lives, Sharing Knowledge, Shaping Systems Connecticut Balance of State Provider Meeting March 26, 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Rebuilding Lives, Sharing Knowledge, Shaping Systems Connecticut Balance of State Provider Meeting March 26, 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Rebuilding Lives, Sharing Knowledge, Shaping Systems Connecticut Balance of State Provider Meeting March 26, 2013

2 Agenda Welcome, Introductions & Acknowledgments BOS Overview 2012 CoC Application Debrief HUD, HEARTH and BOS Priorities & Policies 2012 Renewal Evaluation Results 2013 Renewal Evaluation Criteria, Scoring & Process Annual Performance Review (APR) Highlights 2013 BOS NOFA Process

3 What is the BOS CoC? Balance of State regions: New Haven suburbs Hartford suburbs The Valley Windham/Tolland Counties Litchfield County Manchester SE CT - New London/Norwich Middletown/Middlesex Bristol Danbury New Britain

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5 BOS Steering Committee Members SC Members:  CT DMHAS, DSS, DOE; CHFA, VA, CCEH, CSH, Consumer  Local “Sub-CoC” Representatives – Bristol, Danbury, Litchfield Cty, Manchester, Middlesex Cty, SE CT, Windham/Tolland  Adding Criminal Justice, others per Action Plan Requirements for Local “Sub-CoC” Steering Committee representation: Locality must have: Functioning CoC or planning body At least 4 mtgs per year (and provide documentation of mtgs)

6 BOS Subcommittees “Meet” as part of Steering Committee Meetings (monthly or bi-monthly) HMIS - comprised of SC members and/or reps from localities with SC representation  Review HMIS implementation and compliance with HUD  Review HMIS Reports and Monitor Data Quality  Ensure CoC is prepared for HEARTH by obtaining baseline performance data  Identify HMIS support and training needs  Report and make recommendations to BOS Steering Committee

7 BOS Subcommittees (cont) Mainstream Resources  Monitor BOS program’s performance on Accessing Mainstream Resources and Benefits  Work on Discharge Planning with Foster Care, DOC, Hospitals  Help coordinate BOS CoC Resources with other Mainstream Funding/Services – NSP, VASH, DOE  Coordinate trainings on entitlements and employment

8 2012 Application Debrief BOS Renewal Awards: $11,614,987 – all 71 renewals funded Rental Assistance – 29 projects - $5,766,934 Leasing – 30 projects - $4,332,786 Operating/Services – 11 projects - $1,457,202 HMIS – 1 project - $58,065 Reallocation and New Project awards to be announced this Spring

9 2012 Debrief NOFA:  No more “Exhibit 1 and 2”  Additional Planning Questions and Outcome Measures  Ranking and Tiering 2013 NOFA – due out May/June!!!!!!!!!

10 2012 CoC Scoring Factor2011 Points2012 Points Performance 3234 Strategic Planning - See CoC Action Plan 2255 CoC Housing & Services 14 Leveraging In performance (3)6 Homeless Needs & Data Collection 26 HMIS – 13 PIT - 8 Housing Emphasis 6Not in scoring Bonus – admin at or below 7% and 100% CH in bonus N/A4 Total Possible

11 New Budget Categories – Supportive Services Beginning with Assessment of Service Needs 2. Assistance with Moving Costs 3. Case Management 4. Child Care 5. Education Services 6. Employment Assistance 7. Food 8. Housing Counseling Services 9. Legal Services 10. Life Skills 11. Mental Health Services 12. Outpatient Health Services 13. Outreach Services 14. Substance Abuse Treatment Services 15. Transportation 16. Utility Deposits

12 Beginning with 2012 Application 1. Maintenance/Repair Exterminating, garbage removal, janitorial contracts, annual 2. Property Taxes and Insurance 3. Replacement Reserve 4. Building Security 5. Electricity, Gas, and Water 6. Furniture 7. Equipment (lease, buy) New Budget Categories - Operating Funds

13 2012 Debrief – 2012 Housing Inventory (HIC) Emergency Shelter: beds Individual beds: 497 Families: 124 units/385 beds Transitional Housing: 541 beds Individual beds: 255 Families: 83 units/232 beds Permanent Supportive Housing: units  Individuals: 1076  Families: 274 units/813 beds

14 2012 Debrief – 2012 PIT Homeless Count Single Adults - People  Sheltered: 555  Transitional: 217  Chronic:170  Total: 772 Families - Households  Sheltered: 106  Transitional: 70  Chronic: 13  Total: 176

15 2012 Consolidated Application (formerly Exhibit I) Performance and 2013 Goals In 2012, CoC met objectives in identified in 2011 CH Beds  CH Beds in  2013 Goal is 652 TH to PH  78% of people exiting TH went to PH in 2012  2013 Goal is 79%

16 2012 Consolidated Application (formerly Exhibit I) Performance and 2013 Goals – 2 PSH Retention  90% of people stayed in PSH six months or longer  2013 Goal is 90% Decrease # of Homeless Families  There were 187 homeless families in 2012  2013 Goal is 186 Employment  22% of people were employed at program exit in 2012  2013 Goal is 23%

17 2012 Consolidated Application (formerly Exhibit I) Performance and 2013 Goals - 3 NEW -- Obtained mainstream benefits at program exit – Standard is 20%  In 2012, 72% had mainstream benefit at exit  2013 Goal is 73% NEW – Reallocation  2013 Goal is to reallocate 1 TH or SSO project Please contact CoC asap if you are interested in reallocation

18 Mainstream Resources at Exit – BOS Performance

19 HEARTH Highlights HEARTH INDICATORS  Decrease numbers of people who are homeless  Reduce returns to homelessness  Decrease length of stay in the homeless system  Increase income, exits to PH

20 HEARTH Highlights - Rental Assistance & Leasing  No more SHP and S+C – programs are together under HEARTH as one  Rental Assistance Projects  Old S+C and projects that converted  Tenant holds lease, rental assistance is administered through housing authority or DMHAS  Leasing Projects  Agency holds lease, HUD is exploring different options and will issue guidance on this  Services/Operating Projects  Projects with services and/or operating monies

21 HEARTH Highlights - Performance  Greater emphasis on performance  Report in project application and APRs:  Obtain/maintain PH  Maintain/increase income  Focus on:  APRs submitted on time  Regular draw-down of funds  Spending all program funds  Match and Leveraging with letters/documentation

22 CoC required to demonstrate that it is:  Collaborating with local education agencies to assist in identification of homeless families and  Informing homeless families and youth of their eligibility for McKinney-Vento education services CoC required to demonstrate that it is:  Considering education needs of children when families are placed in emergency or transitional shelter and  Placing families with children as close as possible to schools of origin HUD Policies Reminders CoC Required Educational Assurances

23 Projects and programs serving families with children must demonstrate that their programs are: Establishing policies and practices that are consistent with the education subtitle of McKinney-Vento Act and other laws relating to education and related services to homeless people Designating a staff person to ensure that children are enrolled in school and connected to services in the community including programs such as:  Head Start  Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act  McKinney-Vento education services Programs’ Required Educational Assurances

24 Liaisons in every school district with responsibilities to identify homeless children, assist with enrollment and participation, refer families to Head Start and other services School Stability –schools must keep in original schools, unless not in best interest or not desired by parent/youth Transportation –schools must provide for stability and access, even crossing district lines Immediate Enrollment –even without records Rights under the Education Subtitle of McKinney Vento

25 Dispute process –families and youth can dispute school decisions; must be enrolled during the dispute process Homeless children and youth are categorically eligible for free school meals; they do not have to fill out paperwork (list from liaison or shelter director suffices) Homeless children and youth are categorically eligible for extra support through Title I (Education for Disadvantaged Federal program), no matter what school they attend Rights under the Education Subtitle (cont)

26 Unaccompanied youth: a child or youth who meets the definition of homeless and is not in the physical custody of a parent or guardian. These youth are typically fleeing abuse or neglect at home, but are not involved in the child welfare system  Liaisons must consider their wishes in school placement, help with disputes Preschool children: 51% of all children in HUD- funded shelters are under the age of 6.  Liaisons must ensure homeless children have access to Head Start and LEA-administered preschool programs Rights under the Education Subtitle - Special Populations

27 HUD Policies Reminders Requirements for Mainstream Resources Enrollment  Case managers systematically assist clients in completing applications for mainstream benefits  Homeless assistance providers supply transportation assistance to clients to attend mainstream benefit appointments, employment training, or jobs  Homeless assistance providers use a single application form for four or more mainstream programs  Homeless assistance providers have staff systematically follow-up to ensure mainstream benefits are received

28 Addressing Street, Veteran and Youth Homelessness  Describe the CoC's current efforts to combat homelessness among veterans and youth  Identify organizations that are currently serving these populations, how these efforts are consistent with CoC strategic plan goals, and how the CoC plans to address this issue in the future  Describe the CoCs efforts to identify and engage persons that routinely sleep on the streets or other places not meant for human habitation

29 Coordinated Access  Required by HUD  Opening Doors - Crisis Response Group working on plans  Next meeting 1:00 pm  Build and expand existing systems – ex. 211  Implementation to begin this summer

30 BOS Admissions Policies - Marketing Marketing for Housing and Services: NOFA Language: “Describe the procedures used by the CoC and its programs to market housing and supportive services to eligible persons regardless of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, familial status, or disability who are least likely to request housing or services in the absence of special outreach”  Providers should have non-discrimination policies in place and assertively outreach to people not involved in the homeless system. BOS Policy to be adopted May ‘13

31 BOS Admission Policies –Discharge Planning Accepting People from Other Public Systems of Care: The HEARTH Act stipulates that state and local governments have policies in place to ensure that public institutions do not routinely discharge individuals into homelessness. Before accepting participants into CoC programs from the Mental Health, Foster Care, Correctional or Public Health Systems, providers will work to ensure that all other discharge options have been exhausted. Accepting a person directly from publicly-funded institutions should only be considered if there are no other viable housing options and the person meets the eligibility criteria for the bed or unit.

32 BOS Admission Policies – Families with Children <18 Keeping Families Intact  Publicly funded Shelters and Transitional Housing in the BOS CoC cannot deny admission or separate families with children under 18 based on the age or gender of a child unless they have obtained a waiver from the BOS CoC Steering Committee. Enrollment in School  BOS Providers will make every effort to ensure that homeless children are enrolled in school within 48 hours of entry into the program.

33 HMIS Update and Discussion  New Vendor – Empowered Solutions Group  Universal Data Elements  Goal is to have 0% no value and low refused/unknown  Bed Coverage  Goal is to have 86% for ES, TH, PSH and RR  Training Available 

34 Performance – HMIS – Universal Data Elements

35 Criteria for Evaluating CoC Renewal Projects  Occupancy at 90%  85% of people in PSH stay 7 at least 6 months  80% leaving TH go to permanent housing  30% of leavers have some form of health insurance  50% of leavers have food stamps  25% of leavers have income from employment 2012 Renewal Evaluation Criteria

36 2012 Renewal Evaluation Criteria (con’t) Criteria for Evaluating CoC Renewal Projects  85% maintain or increase income at exit  90% did not leave for an undesirable destination (unknown, unsheltered, jail, etc)  90% leave with financial resources (cash and non-cash)  90% of HUD Required Data Elements are in HMIS  35% Consumer survey response rate  Consumer satisfaction survey score

37 2012 Renewal Evaluation Results Criteria All Projects 2012 All Projects 2011 TH 2012 PSH 2012 TH 2011 PSH 2011 APR (50) Surveys (15) HMIS Standards (10)10 9 HMIS Data Quality (10) Budget Accuracy (15)n/a14n/a 14 Final Score (100) Median High Low # of Projects scored

38 2012 Renewal Scores and Corrective Action Policy Each year the Steering Committee establishes a minimum scoring threshold. Projects scoring below 75 must do a corrective action plan. Agencies in corrective action process are not eligible to apply for funding for new projects. Programs in corrective action status for 2 consecutive years may be at risk of losing their funding. (Has never happened)

39 Achieving HEARTH Performance Measures CT Performance Measures (see handout)  Based on HUD/HEARTH benchmarks  Incorporated in CT BOS CoC standards for renewal projects

40 Criteria for Evaluating CoC Renewal Projects  Occupancy at 90%  90% of people in PSH stay 7 at least 6 months  85% leaving TH go to permanent housing  60% of leavers have some form of health insurance  60% of leavers have food stamps  25% of leavers from PSH have income from work  40% of leavers from TH have income from work  85% maintain or increase income at exit 2013 BOS Renewal Evaluation Criteria

41 2013 BOS Renewal Evaluation Criteria (con’t) Criteria for Evaluating CoC Renewal Projects  10% or less leave for did not leave for shelter, street or unknown  80% leave with non-cash financial resources  35% Consumer survey response rate  Consumer satisfaction results  Timely draw-down of funds  Spending all grant funds awarded for last full year of operation  HUD monitoring results and findings  90% of HUD Required Data Elements are in HMIS  Meet HMIS compliance standards

42 HUD APR – Why is it important? The APR impacts your program in important ways: Used by HUD to:  Evaluate your progress  Aggregate national data about homeless people & programs  Review HEARTH Indicators:  Decrease numbers of people who are homeless  Reduce returns to homelessness  Decrease length of stay in the homeless system  Increase income, exits to PH

43 HUD APR – Why is it important? - 2 The APR impacts your program in important ways:  Used by CT BOS to:  Score and rank programs for renewal  Compile aggregate data for the HUD application, which affects how much $ the CT BOS CoC receives  Necessary to keep CoC and project funds flowing

44 Measured through the APR:  At least 80% of homeless persons stay in permanent housing for more than 6 months  At least 65% of homeless persons in Transitional Housing move into permanent housing  At least 20% of homeless persons are employed at exit  At least 20% of leavers have noncash benefits at exit HUD Standards

45 Objective related to housing stability:  # of Persons age 18 and older who maintained or PSH or exited to PH as of the end of the operating year or program exit Objective related to improving income:  # of Persons age 18 and older who maintained or increased their total income (from all sources) as of the end of the operating year or program exit Other HUD Standards – Set by Programs

46 APR – Key Definitions - Leavers and Stayers Leavers:  Persons who exited the program and are no longer enrolled in the program as of the last day of the reporting period. Stayers:  Persons who were in the program on the last day of the reporting period. This includes clients who exited the program and re-entered the program before the end of the reporting period.

47 APR – Key Definitions – Client Type Adult:  Any person 18 years of age or older.  A person’s age is based on the program entry date closest to the end of the operating year.  If a person entered the program prior to the start of the reporting period, the person’s age should be based on the first day of the reporting period.

48 APR – Key Definitions – Client Type Children:  Any persons under the age of 18.  A person’s age is based on the program entry date closest to the end of the operating year.  If a person entered the program prior to the start of the reporting period, the person’s age should be based on the first day of the reporting period.

49 APR – Key Definitions - Households Household without Children:–  A household that does not include any children, including unaccompanied adults, multiple adult households, and pregnant women age 18 or older not accompanied by other children.  For the purposes of APR reporting, households without children that contain multiple persons should be counted as one household without children.

50 APR – Key Definitions - Households Household with Children – Any household with at least one child. There are two types of households with children:  Households with at least one adult and one child include households composed of at least two persons, one of whom is an adult and one is a child.  Households with only children are composed only of persons age 17 or under, including unaccompanied children, adolescent parents and their children, adolescent siblings, pregnant women under 18 years old, or other household configurations composed only of children

51 APR – Key Definitions - Operating Year  For SHP programs, the operating year is the 12-month period beginning on the Operating Start Date.  For new grants without funds for acquisition, construction or rehabilitation, the operating start date is the first day of the month in which the grantee or sponsor begins incurring eligible costs. The date is set by the grantee at the time of first draw down from LOCCS.  The operating year start and end dates entered into the APR should correspond with the operating start and end dates entered into LOCCS

52 APR Highlights – Pre-APR Checklist - Leavers Prior to working on APR, gather following info from Pre-APR checklist: Leavers Number of: 1. Adult Leavers without Children: 2. Adult Leavers with Children: 3. Children Leavers: 4. Total Adults Leavers: 5. Total Leavers:

53 APR Highlights – Pre-APR Checklist - Stayers Prior to working on APR, gather following info from Pre-APR checklist: Stayers Number of: 6. Adult Stayers without Children 7. Adult Stayers with Children 8. Children Stayers 9. Adult Stayers (6+7) 10. Total Stayers (8+9)

54 APR Highlights –Who are you reporting on? For questions related to all persons, the column “With Children and Adults” must include all persons in family households Q15 (Age) question related to all persons served but adults and children are on different tables Q16-Q20 questions related to all persons served Q21 (Vets) question refers to Adults only

55 APR Highlights –Who are you reporting on? Q22, questions related to all persons served but leavers and stayers are on different tables. Q23 (Cash Income) question related to Adults only but leavers and stayers are on different tables. Q27 (Length of Stay) question related to all persons served Q29 (Destination) question related to all persons exiting based on length of stay

56 APR Submission Deadline APRs are to be completed and submitted within 90 days of the end of your HUD program’s operating year by the following program types: Failure to submit APR within 110 days of end of operating year will stop drawdowns from LOCCS No time limit on submitting corrected APR

57 Final APR  An APR is a final APR if it is covering the last operating year of your grant or your grant was for only a one-year term. Amended APR  To submit a corrected or amended APR, you must first submit a question requesting the ability to amend your APR via the Virtual Help Desk at If HUD approves this request, you will be able submit a corrected or amended APR. Other Key Definitions

58 Target Population from Application is Being Served Number of People Served is consistent with the application Participants are Eligible  Homeless from streets shelters or transitional housing for homeless people  Disabled where applicable Ongoing Assessments of Service Needs are conducted at least annually Children are Enrolled in School – Staff who is Educational Liaison Rent is calculated correctly  Income is re-examined annually HUD Program Priorities – Important for Monitoring

59  Terminations follow a protocol that guarantees rights of participants to due process  Non-discrimination in all activities  Procedures to provide information on handicapped accessible services and serve people with Limited English Proficiency (LEP)  Homeless or formerly homeless people participate in the program’s policy-making process  For example, member of the Board of Directors HUD Program Priorities – Important for Monitoring - 2

60 APR’s and other required documentation submitted on time Funds expended in a timely manner and spent on eligible activities Cash match requirements are met Proper financial controls Evidence of staff time working on grant - timesheets Drug-free work place HUD Program Priorities – Important for Monitoring - 3

61 Resources  APR Training materials: https://www.onecpd.info/resource/2002/coc- annual-performance-report-apr-virtual-training/ https://www.onecpd.info/resource/2002/coc- annual-performance-report-apr-virtual-training/  Main HUD Resources Webpage:  General Info on Homelessness: National Alliance Sign up for Listservs from HUD and NAEH!!

62 Expectations and Preparations for PIT Count and HIC in HDX Database - April 2.GIW (Grant Inventory Worksheet) Update – April/May? 3.Updated APR’s – Due April 15th 4.Consumer Satisfaction Surveys – Due April 26th 5.Consolidated Application (formerly Exhibit 1) Information – Due April 26 th 6.New Project RFP – TBD (May?) 7.Training for Providers – May, June

63 Thanks! For Questions Contact: Suzanne Wagner Liz Myles Wensek


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