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Advanced C Programming Real Time Programming Like the Pros.

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Presentation on theme: "Advanced C Programming Real Time Programming Like the Pros."— Presentation transcript:

1 Advanced C Programming Real Time Programming Like the Pros

2 Contents  typedef’s  Fixed-Point Math  Filtering  Oversampling  Overflow Protection  Switch Debouncing

3 Good Coding Practices  Signed (good) vs Unsigned (bad) Math –for physical calculations  Use Braces { Always }  Simple Readable Code –Concept of “Self Documenting Code” –Code as if your grandmother is reading it  Never use Recursion –(watch your stack) *Disclaimer: Not all code in this presentation follows these practices due to space limitations

4 Typedef’s Using Naturally Named Data Types

5 Why Typedef?  You use variable with logical names, why not use data types with logical names?  Is an “int” 8-bits or 16-bits? What’s a “long”? Better question: why memorize it?  Most integer data types are platform dependent!!!  typedef’s make your code more portable.

6 How to use typedef’s 1)Create a logical data type scheme. For example, a signed 8-bit number could be “s8”. 2)Create a “typedef.h” file for each microcontroller platform you use. 3)#include “typedef.h” in each of your files. 4)Use your new data type names.

7 typedef.h Example typedef unsigned char u8; typedef signed char s8; typedef unsigned short u16; typedef signed short s16; typedef unsigned long u32; typedef signed long s32; In your code: unsigned char variable; Is replaced with: u8 variable;

8 Fixed-Point Math Fractional Numbers Using Integer Data Types

9 Creating Fractions  Fractions are created by using extra bits below your whole numbers.  The programmer is responsible for knowing where the “decimal place” is.  Move the decimal place by using the shift operator ( >).  Shifting is multiplying by powers of 2. Ex.: x >5 = x*2^-5

10 Fixed Point Fraction Example A/D Sample (10-bit) Fractional part Shift left by 6 (i.e. A2D << 6;): Whole part

11 Fractional Example, continued  We know 5/2 = 2.5  If we used pure integers, 5/2 = 2 (i.e. the number is rounded toward negative infinity)  Using a fixed-point fractional portion can recover the lost decimal portion.

12 Fractional Example, continued = 5 A/D Sample (10-bit) Fractional part Shift left by 6 (i.e. A2D << 6;): Whole part = “5.0”

13 Fractional Example, continued Divide by 2 (i.e. A2D / 2;): Fractional part Whole part The whole part: (binary) = 2(decimal) The fractional part: (binary) = 32 (huh???) Fractional part Whole part

14 Fractional Example, continued Divide by 2 (i.e. A2D / 2;): Fractional part Whole part The fractional part: (binary) = 32 (huh???) How many different values can the fractional part be? Answer: we have 6 bits => 2^6 values = 64 values (i.e.) (binary) = 64(decimal) Therefore: Fractional part is actually 32/64 = 0.5

15 Fractional Example, conclusion Divide by 2 (i.e. A2D / 2;): Fractional part Whole part By using a fixed-point fractional part, we can have 5/2 = 2.5 -The more bits you use in your fractional part, the more accuracy you will have. -Accuracy is 2^-(fraction bits). -For example, if we have 6 bits in our fractional part (like the above example), our accuracy is 2^-6 = In other words, every bit is equal to

16 Fractional Example, example Adding Once our math operations are complete, we right shift our data to regain our original resolution and data position. If we look diving and adding multiple values using this method we can see the benefit of fixed point math. This example assumes we are adding two “5/2” operations as shown = 5 0 Without using the fixed point math the result of the addition would have been 4 due to the truncation of the integer division.

17 Filtering Smoothing Your Signals

18 Filter Types  Filters are classified by what they allow to pass through (NOT what they filter out).  For example, a “low pass filter” (abv. LPF) allows low frequencies to pass through – it therefore removes high frequencies.  The most common filters are: high pass filters, low pass filters, and band pass filters.  We will only cover low pass filters.

19 Low Pass Filters  Low Pass Filters (LPFs) are used to smooth out the signal.  Common applications: –Removing sensor noise –Removing unwanted signal frequencies –Signal averaging

20 Low Pass Filters, continued  There are two basic types of filters: –Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) –Finite Impulse Response (FIR)  FIR filters are “moving averages”  IIR filters act just like electrical resistor-capacitor filters. IIR filters allow the output of the filter to move a fixed fraction of the way toward the input.

21 Moving Average (FIR) Filter Example #define WINDOW_SIZE 16 s16 inputArray[WINDOW_SIZE]; u8 windowPtr; s32 filter; s16 temp; s16 oldestValue = inputArray[windowPtr]; filter += input - oldestValue; inputArray[windowPtr] = input; if (++windowPtr >= WINDOW_SIZE) { windowPtr = 0; windowPtr = 0;}

22 Moving Average Filter Considerations  For more filtering effect, use more data points in the average.  Since you are adding a lot of numbers, there is a high chance of overflow – take precautions

23 IIR Filter Example (Floating Point) #define FILTER_CONST 0.8 static float filtOut; static float filtOut_z; float input; // filter code filtOut_z = filtOut; filtOut = input + FILTER_CONST * (filtOut_z – input); // optimized filter code (filtOut_z not needed) filtOut = input + FILTER_CONST * (filtOut – input);

24 IIR Filter Example (Fixed Point) // filter constant will be Get this by // (1 – 2^-2). Remember X * 2^-2 = X >> 2 #define FILT_SHIFT 2 static s16 filtOut; s16 input; // filter code filtOut += (input - filtOut) >> FILT_SHIFT;

25 IIR Filter Example (Fixed Point) Whoa! How did we get from filtOut = input + FILTER_CONST * (filtOut – input); To filtOut += (input - filtOut) >> FILT_SHIFT; Math: filtOut = input + (1 - 2^-2) * (filtOut – input) = input + filtOut – input – 2^-2*filtOut + 2^-2*input = input + filtOut – input – 2^-2*filtOut + 2^-2*input = filtOut + 2^-2 * (input – filtOut) = filtOut + 2^-2 * (input – filtOut) filtOut += (input – filtOut) >> 2

26 IIR Filter Considerations (Fixed Point)  For more filtering effect, make the shift factor bigger.  Take precautions for overflow.  You can get more resolution by using more shift factors. For example, have your filter constant be (1 – 2^-SHIFT1 – 2^-2SHIFT2) (1 – 2^-SHIFT1 – 2^-2SHIFT2) (you’ll have to work out the math!)

27 Oversampling Gain resolution and make your data more reliable.

28 Oversampling Basics  Simple oversampling: sample more data (i.e. faster sample rate) than you need and average the samples.  Even if you don’t sample faster, averaging (or filtering the data) can be beneficial.

29 Oversampling Effects  Helps to “smooth” the data.  Helps to “hide” a bad or unreliable sample.  Increases A/D resolution if noise is present.

30 Oversampling Effects

31 Overflow Protection Making Sure Your Code Is Predictable

32 What is Overflow? Why is it Bad?  Overflow is when you try to store a number that is too large for its data type.  For example, what happens to the following code? s8 test = 100; test = test + 50;

33 Overflow Protection Methods 1. Create a new temporary variable using a data type with a larger range to do the calculation. 2. Compare the sign of the variable before and after the calculation. Did the sign change when it shouldn’t have? (for signed variables) 3. Compare the variable after the calculation to the value before. Did the value decrease when it should have increased?

34 Overflow Protection, Example 1 s16 add16(s16 adder1, s16 adder2); // prototype S16 add16(s16 adder1, s16 adder2) { s32 temp = (s32)adder1 + (s32)adder2; s32 temp = (s32)adder1 + (s32)adder2; if (temp > 32767) // overflow will occur if (temp > 32767) // overflow will occur return 32767; return 32767; else if (temp < ) // underflow else if (temp < ) // underflow return ; return ; else else return (s16)temp; return (s16)temp;} *This example uses a s32 (larger) data value for overflow checking

35 Overflow Protection, Example 2 // prototype s16 addTo16bit(s16 start, s16 adder); S16 addTo16bit(s16 start, s16 adder) { s16 temp = start; s16 temp = start; start += adder; start += adder; if ((start > 0) && (adder > 0) && (temp 0) && (adder > 0) && (temp <= 0)) return 32767; // Overflow occurred return 32767; // Overflow occurred else if ((start = 0)) else if ((start = 0)) return ; // Underflow occurred return ; // Underflow occurred else else return start; return start;} *This example uses 16 bit values only to check for overflow on signed values this provides improved efficiency on 16 bit platforms.

36 Overflow Protection, Example 3 // prototype u16 addToUnsigned16bit(u16 start, s16 adder); S16 addToUnsigned16bit(u16 start, s16 adder) { u16 temp = start; u16 temp = start; start += adder; start += adder; if ((adder > 0) && (start 0) && (start < temp)) return 65536; // Overflow occurred return 65536; // Overflow occurred else if ((adder temp)) else if ((adder temp)) return 0; // underflow occurred return 0; // underflow occurred else else return start; return start;} *This example checks for overflow on unsigned values

37 Switch Debouncing Having Confidence in Switch Inputs

38 Why Debounce? When to Use It?  Debouncing a switch input reduces erroneous inputs.  Use debouncing when pressing a switch starts a sequence or changes the state of something.

39 When to Debounce Examples  Debounce when a single push of the switch changes a state. Examples: - pneumatic gripper - pneumatic gripper - motorized gripper where a single push causes the motor to go until a limit switch is reached - motorized gripper where a single push causes the motor to go until a limit switch is reached  Do not debounce if constant driver input is needed.

40 What is Debouncing?  Basically, debouncing means to require a certain number of samples before you confirm the switch input.  Various debounce schemes can be used: - require N consecutive samples (i.e. reset the counter if one sample fails) - require N consecutive samples (i.e. reset the counter if one sample fails) - count up / count down (i.e., if one sample fails, decrement the counter by 1 rather than resetting to zero. - count up / count down (i.e., if one sample fails, decrement the counter by 1 rather than resetting to zero.

41 Debounce Example // debounce opening gripper // debounce opening gripper if (!pneumaticGripperOpenState) if (!pneumaticGripperOpenState) { if (gripperOpenSwitch == ON) if (gripperOpenSwitch == ON) gripperOpenDebCount++; gripperOpenDebCount++; else else gripperOpenDebCount = 0; gripperOpenDebCount = 0; if (gripperOpenDebCount >= DEBOUNCE_LIMIT) if (gripperOpenDebCount >= DEBOUNCE_LIMIT) { gripperOpenDebCount = 0; gripperOpenDebCount = 0; pneumaticGripperOpenState = TRUE; pneumaticGripperOpenState = TRUE; } }


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