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Caesar’s English II Lesson XV. culp (blame) culprit, culpable, exculpate CULP means blame. We blame the culprit; to be culpable is to be guilty; and to.

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Presentation on theme: "Caesar’s English II Lesson XV. culp (blame) culprit, culpable, exculpate CULP means blame. We blame the culprit; to be culpable is to be guilty; and to."— Presentation transcript:

1 Caesar’s English II Lesson XV

2 culp (blame) culprit, culpable, exculpate CULP means blame. We blame the culprit; to be culpable is to be guilty; and to exculpate someone is to free them from blame! Spanish…culpable

3 pugn (fight) pugnacious, pugilist, oppugn PUGN means fight. A pugnacious person is combative; a puglilist is a fighter; and to oppugn something is to attack or resist it! Spanish…pugnaz

4 URB (city) urban, suburb, urbane URB means city. An urban environment is a city environment; the suburbs are the neighborhoods around the city; and an urbane person is sophisticated and citified! Spanish…urbano

5 numer (number) numeral, enumeration, supernumerary NUMER means number. A numeral is a number; to enumerate is to list; and supernumeraries are extra people! Spanish…enumeración

6 acr (sharp) acrid, acerbity, acrimony ACR means sharp. An acrid smell such as ammonia is sharp; acerbity is sharpness of temper; and acrimony is a sharp and heated dispute! Spanish…acrimonia

7 Advanced Word: Pugnacious The adjective pugnacious comes from the stems pugn, fight, and ous, full of. To be pugnacious is to be combative, ready to fight anyone. Pugnacious people are aggressive and ready to challenge. Sometimes they seem insulting, with a chip on their shoulder. In 1974 E.L. Doctorow wrote, in his novel Ragtime, that “This caused him to tile his chin upwards in order to see, giving him a pugnacious look.” In Joseph Heller’s novel Catch-22 a character “thundered pugnaciously in a voice loud enough to rattle the whole building.”

8 Caesar’s English II Lesson XV Stem meaningExample culpblameculprit pugnfight Pugnacious urbcityurban numernumberNumeral acrsharpacrid

9 PUGILIST : PUGNACIOUS :: a.urban : suburban b.culprit : culpable c.exculpate : innocent d.enumerate : items

10 PUGILIST : PUGNACIOUS :: a.urban : suburban b.culprit : culpable c.exculpate : innocent d.enumerate : items

11 OPPUGN : SANCTION :: a.pugilist : glove b.city : suburb c.supernumerary : extra d.exculpate : convict

12 OPPUGN : SANCTION :: a.pugilist : glove b.city : suburb c.supernumerary : extra d.exculpate : convict

13 Find the best opposite. ACRIMONY a.pugnacity b.verisimilitude c.urbanity d.harmony

14 Find the best opposite. ACRIMONY a.pugnacity b.verisimilitude c.urbanity d.harmony

15 PUGNACIOUS a.mollifying b.oppugning c.enumerating d.exculpating

16 PUGNACIOUS a.mollifying b.oppugning c.enumerating d.exculpating

17 The gladiators were trained as expert ___________. a.culprits b.pugilists c.supernumeraries d.interlocutors

18 The gladiators were trained as expert ___________. a.culprits b.pugilists c.supernumeraries d.interlocutors

19 Prisoners captured in Gaul were rarely ____________. a.exculpated b.oppugned c.disputed d.enumerated

20 Prisoners captured in Gaul were rarely ____________. a.exculpated b.oppugned c.disputed d.enumerated

21 The spectacles in the Colosseum required a great many ______________. a.acrimonies b.numerals c.exculpations d.supernumeraries

22 The spectacles in the Colosseum required a great many ______________. a.acrimonies b.numerals c.exculpations d.supernumeraries

23 The Grammar of Vocabulary: pugnancious, an adjective. The pugnacious Gauls were no match for the legions. ________________________________________

24 Caesar’s Classic Words Challenge From Frederick Douglass’s Narrative I would allow myself to suffer…rather than ______________ myself. a.enumerate b.oppugn c.exculpate d.impute

25 Caesar’s Classic Words Challenge From Frederick Douglass’s Narrative I would allow myself to suffer…rather than ______________ myself. a.enumerate b.oppugn c.exculpate d.impute

26 From James Watson’s The Double Helix Rosy and Gosling were ___________ assertive. a.urbanely b.acrimoniously c.culpably d.pugnaciously

27 From James Watson’s The Double Helix Rosy and Gosling were ___________ assertive. a.urbanely b.acrimoniously c.culpably d.pugnaciously

28 From Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre They treated her with coldness and ___________. a.enumeration b.acrimony c.pugnacity d.urbanity

29 From Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre They treated her with coldness and ___________. a.enumeration b.acrimony c.pugnacity d.urbanity


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