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2 Transition Assessment … appropriate measurable postsecondary goals based upon age- appropriate transition assessments related to training, education, employment and independent living skills, where appropriate IDEA 2004

3 An individualized, on-going process that includes meaningful participation by the student and family. It creates a comprehensive portfolio of assessment results as well as summaries of experiences and information from existing records. Transition Assessment

4 The resultant portfolio produces a clear profile of the student’s present levels of academic and functional performances in relationship to the student’s post secondary goals. Transition Assessment

5 Identifies students strengths, abilities, deficits, preferences, & interests Establishes present levels of performance, considering all major areas of need related to adult functioning; (a) personal choice & self determination, (b) employment, (c) personal management, (d) academics, recreation/leisure, (e) community access & use, and (f) relationships/social skills Informs transition planning, including determining appropriate (a) IEP goals & (b) educational experiences.

6 Transition Assessment Identifies further training needs (Brown- Glover & Wehman, 1996) Obtains information re work habits, socialization skills, work attitudes and work tolerance (Sarkees & Scott 1985) Determines accommodations, supports and services needed to attain and maintain post secondary goals Determines student awareness of career options related to preferences, interests, and skills.

7 Needed to access certain adult services (e.g., psychological needed for accessing disabilities services in IHEs, determining eligibility for VR services, determining eligibility for DRH/MR services, …..) Transition Assessment

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10 State Performance Plan/Annual Performance Report Report Card Data Indicator 13: Percent of youth aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the post-secondary goals. Indicator 14: Percent of youth who had IEPs, are no longer in secondary school and who have been competitively employed, enrolled in some type of postsecondary school, or both, within one year of leaving high school. School are responsible for OUTCOMES!

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12 Transition Is All About… Employment Economic Security Vocational Rehabilitation Work Incentive Programs Apprenticeships Your Own Business Supported Employment School-based Training Non-paid Work Experience Paid Work Experience Community Living Transportation/Travel Training Recreation & Vacations Health and Safety Dignity & Respect Apartment/Home Taking Risks Finances and Banking Passing Driver’s Test What to do in an Emergency Continued Learning Graduation from High School * Regular Diploma *GED *Other Diploma College/504 rights Adult Education Auditing College Courses Technical School Crafts or classes of Interst Having A Say Making Choices Voting Conservatorship / Power of Attorney ADA Rights Asking for help when you need it Self Determination Self-Advocacy Circle of Friends Joining a group or movement

13 Live independently Play sports Work JOHN’S VISION

14 JANE’S VISION Graduate with a regular diploma Go to College Work with animals Live away from home

15 … Including: DREAMS NEEDS STRENTHS PREFERENCES INTERESTS Live independently Work Play sports Graduate with a diploma Go to College Work with animals Live away from home

16 STEP 2 Describe the student’s present levels of educational and vocational performance. IDENTIFY THE STUDENT’S STRENGTHS.

17 . Independent Living: He needs minimal assistance with his personal care. John’s strengths: He is good at sports, has many friends, and is a hard worker John’s Present Levels of Educational and Vocational Performance: John does not communicate through speech. His disability is moderate mental retardation. Work Experience: John has never worked before. Recreation and Leisure: John swims for Special Olympics and attends social groups at school and in his community. Community: John needs assistance using public transportation. He has difficulty finding his way around his school and community. Postsecondary Training: No plans for college.

18 Jane’s Strengths I have good reading and study skills. I am very social and a hard worker. I also manage my money well. Present Levels of Educational and Vocational Performance: I have above average intelligence. My strengths are in visual memory, organization, and problem solving. My learning disabilities are in attention and written language. I need to have a quiet place to work. Work Experience: Jane worked over the summer at the SPCA. She is able to work independently after instructions are given. Recreation and Leisure: Jane is very active in school groups. She has a large group of friends outside of school as well. Independent Living: Jane has daily chores at home and is very responsible in completing them. Postsecondary Training: Jane has taken two classes at the local Junior College.

19 STEP 3 DESIGN A STATEMENT OF TRANSITION SERVICE NEEDS Outline a program for the student’s school including community activities. The course of study may include required, advanced placement, modified, elective, or specially-designed courses. The decisions regarding the course of study should relate to how the student is functioning and what he/she wants after high school. Identify if the course of study leads to a regular diploma or a Special Ed Diploma or Certificate of Attendance STEP 4 This portion of the IEP planning process identifies the transition instruction and service activities, personnel, or resources that can be utilized to help the student achieve his/her postschool goals and dreams. DESIGN A STATEMENT OF NEEDED TRANSITION SERVICES

20 There are five categories of transition services that must be considered by the IEP team: 1. Instruction. 2. Community experience outside the classroom setting. 3. Employment and other postschool adult living objectives. 4. Related services. 5. Linkages. AS NECESSARY: 6.Daily living skills. 7. Vocational evaluation.

21 These goals should support the student’s dreams and visions. STEP 5 DETERMINE ANNUAL GOALS

22 By 1/05, John will find the items on his grocery list in the store and purchase them independently. GOAL: By 1/05 John will demonstrate the ability to shop in a grocery store. BENCHMARKS : By 5/04, John will make a grocery list of three items selected from the newspaper ads. By 10/04, John will use the “dollar over method” to estimate the amount of money he will need for his purchase. JOHN’S GOALS AND BENCHMARKS

23 By 1/05, I will discuss my disability and needed accommodations at my IEP meeting and with my teachers. JANE’S GOALS AND BENCHMARKS GOAL: By 1/05 I will articulate with 100% accuracy, when asked by my general education teachers, what accommodations I need for my learning disabilities. BENCHMARKS : By 5/07, I will be able to discuss in a small group, my learning disabilities and the accommodations I need with 100% accuracy. By 10/04, I will list my own needed accommodations when requested by my resource teacher with 100% accuracy.

24 JOHN’S TRANSITION PLANNING PROFILE Career InterestsStrengths Work in music store Good at sports Computer workHas many friends Hard worker Present levels of performance John’s Present Levels of Educational and Vocational Performance: John does not communicate through speech. His disability is moderate mental retardation. Work Experience: John has never worked before. Recreation and Leisure: John swims for Special Olympics and attends social groups at school and in his community. Independent Living: John needs minimal assistance in his personal care. Community: John needs assistance using public transportation. He has difficulty finding his way around his school and community. Postsecondary Training: No plans for college. Transition Services NeedsNeeded Transition Services John needs functional skills curriculum and Instruction: John needs a curriculum emphasizing community-based instruction. daily living, social and community-based instruction John needs assistance in accessing adultCommunity:John needs connections to adult community services and support.community services and opportunities to explore John needs supported work-based learning activities that reflect his interests on a weekly basis. experiences.Employment: John needs to participate in at least John needs opportunities to participate in one on-campus volunteer job per semester. activities with persons with like interests butDaily Living: John needs practice with daily living without disabilities.skills at home and school. VISION Work Play sports Live independently

25 John’s Transition Planning Profile (con’t) John’s Goals and Benchmarks Goal # 1: By 1/04, John will participate in his high school booster club activities. Benchmarks: 1.John will keep a calendar of booster club meetings and events with 100% accuracy. 2.John will attend at least 80% of the booster club meetings and events. 3.John will learn the “yells” used at the games with the help of his teacher and peer mentor. Goal # 2: John will demonstrate the ability to shop in a grocery store. Benchmarks: 1.By 5/03, John will make a grocery list of three items using selected newspaper ads. 2. By 10/03, John will use the “dollar-over method” to estimate the amount of money he will need for the items on his list. 3.By 1/05, John will find the items on his grocery list in the store and purchase them independently. Goal # 3: John will have a variety of on-campus work experiences. Benchmark: 1. By 1/04, John will have participated in a minimum of three different on-campus work experiences.

26 JANE’S TRANSITION PROFILE Career InterestsStrengths Have a jobGood reader Work with animalsGood study skills Get a degreeVery social Good with money Hard worker Present levels of performance: Jane’s present levels of educational and Vocational Performance: I have above average intelligence. My strengths are in visual memory, organization, and problem solving. My learning disabilities are in attention and written language. I need to have a quiet place to work. Work Experience: Jane worked over the summer at the SPCA. She is able to work independently after instructions are given. Recreation and Leisure: Jane is active in school groups. She has a large group of friends outside of school as well. Independent Living: Jane has daily chores at home and is very responsible in completing them. Community Participation: Jane has a checking account and is responsible for purchasing everything she needs for school and leisure. She is able to balance her check book with assistance each month. Postsecondary Training: Jane has taken two classes at the Junior College. TRANSITION SERVICES NEEDSNEEDED TRANSITION SERVICES I need instruction on study and organizationalInstruction: I need to enroll in a study skills strategies to be successful in my generalclass and tutoring program for my writing education classes. I need instruction on self-advocacy to explain my Community: I need to explore joining a teen disability and needed accommodations.support group for learning disabilities. I need career exploration activities. I need to take college preparation classes.Employment: I need to participate in work experience offered at my high school. VISION Graduate with a diploma Go to college Live independently Work with animals

27 JANE’S TRANSITION PLANNING PROFILE Con’t.) Jane’s Goals and Benchmarks Goal # 1: By 1/07, I will articulate with 100% accuracy, when asked by my general education teachers, the accommodations I need for my writing disability and attention deficit disorder. Benchmarks: 1.By 5/09,I will discuss, in small group, my learning disabilities and the accommodations that I need with 100% accuracy. 2.By 10/06, I will list my own needed accommodations when requested by my resource teacher with 100% accuracy. 3.By 1/07,I will discuss my disability and accommodations that work for me at my IEP meeting and with my teachers. Goal # 2: By 1/07, I will apply selected learning strategies related to written communication in my classes. Benchmarks: 1.By 6/04, I will try out several computer-based outlining programs and select one that I would like to use for my written assignments. 2.By 5/05, I will demonstrate competence in using the program in my resource class rated by my resource teacher on two written assignments. 3.By 1/06, I will use the writing strategy in my general education classes. 4.By 1/06, I will maintain a “C” or better in all of my classes. Goal # 3: I will explore my career interest areas in animal science and veterinary medicine. Benchmarks: 1.I will use the career center to research careers in my interest areas and present an oral and written presentation in my resource class. 2.I will job shadow two people in my career areas of interest. 3.I will visit the veterinary assistance class offered through ROP and the community college.

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29  Provides school districts with a wide variety of assessment strategies, tools, and approaches in order to individualize the transition assessment.  Must include strategies and tools to assess present levels of functional performance in all areas of need, e.g., personal choice & self determination, vocational, personal management, relationships, recreation/leisure, community access & use, academics.

30  Demonstrates district compliance with IDEA 2004 requirements for age-appropriate transition assessment.  Provides face validity to stakeholders – teachers, parents, student, who can answer the question, “Is it true for this student?”

31 MethodDescription Interviews and Questionnaires Interviews with students, family members, former teachers, friends, counselors, other support staff, and former employers Discrepancy Analysis Observations Observations of the student within typical daily environments and activities compared to others typically performing same routines acceptably. Ecological and Environmental Inventories Information gathered about specific geographic areas (e.g., neighborhoods) or environments (e.g. workplaces) Situational Assessments Observing and assessing the student’s behaviors in environments that will closely resemble his or her future working, living, or educational environments Adapted from: Sax, C.L. & Thoma, C.A. (2002). Transition Assessment. Wise Practices for Quality Lives. Baltimore, MD: Paul Brookes Transition Assessment Toolkit Approaches

32 MethodDescription Interest Inventories Interest inventories are typically paper and pencil instruments that solicit information about personal and occupational preferences Samples of Student Behavior Samples of student behavior over time, collected using multiple procedures (e.g., written products, videotape, …). The sample tasks are regularly performed in the natural contexts/environments. Curriculum- Based Assessments Provides information about a student’s progress on specific skills within an academic curriculum Adapted from: Sax, C.L. & Thoma, C.A. (2002). Transition Assessment. Wise Practices for Quality Lives. Baltimore, MD: Paul Brookes Transition Assessment Toolkit Approaches (continued)

33 MethodExamples Interviews and Questionnaires Student Surveys Parent Surveys Transition Skills Inventory (Benz, M.R.& Lindstrom, L.E. 1997). The Social Network Interview Guide (Institute for Community Inclusion, Boston, MA) EdExcellence’s HCAI, ASPGEC, & Peer Inventories Multiple Intelligences Inventories Discrepancy Analysis Observations  Direct observation of student performances in natural contexts compared to others. May be recorded in writing, on DVD, or on videotape Ecological and Environmental Inventories  Neighborhood inventory - surveys array of businesses and other community activities and resources within a reasonable distance of the student’s home.  Workplace Analysis Transition Assessment Toolkit Examples

34 MethodExamples Situational Assessments Partnerships for EdExcellence’s Situational Vocational Assessment (formerly LRE for LIFE Project). JOBS Situational Vocational Assessment Interest Inventories  Kuder DD Occupational Interest Survey (Zytowski, 1985).  Strong Interest Inventory (Hanson, 1985).  Person Centered Planning Processes (e.g., PATH, MAPS). Samples of Student Behavior Videotape/DVD recordings of student behavior in natural contexts Curriculum- Based Assessments TCAP, Gateway Tests, Brigance, and other formal/ standardized criterion referenced tests Curriculum “benchmark” tests Transition Assessment Toolkit Examples (continued)

35 Visit the Partnerships for EdExcellence Website At the top right hand corner of the home page click on “Resources” Click on “Presentations, Materials and Links” Click on “Transition” Scroll down and click on “Transition Assessment Tool Kit”

36 Transition Assessment Toolkit Communication Summary Form Employability Life Skills Assessment Functional Skills Assessment Getting from Here to There: Student Transition Planning Tool Home Community Activities Inventory Health History Form Interest Inventory Kuder Career Planning System Life Centered Career Education Competency Rating Scale Record Form MAPS and Transition Planning Multiple Intelligences Survey Online Career Interest Survey Parent Guardian Questionnaire Personal Futures Plan Agenda Pictorial Multiple Intelligences Survey Quickbooks IEP Checklist of Transition Assessments Recreation and Leisure Inventory School and Community Social Skills Rating Self-Advocacy Self-Determination Checklist Situational Vocational Assessment Student Profile Transition Assessment Student Questionnaire for Transition Planning Student Recreation\Leisure Inventory Transition Assessments List Transition Planning Profile

37 Vocational Rehabilitation Requires Comprehensive Vocational Assessment WHY ASSESSMENTS ARE NECESSARY PRIOR TO EXIT FROM HIGH SCHOOL? ? ? ? ? Postsecondary Schools require documentation of a current disability & need for academic adjustment

38 UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN APPLICABLE LAWS IS KEY TO SUCCESSFUL TRANSITION FROM HIGH SCHOOL


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