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Lifelong Learning for All & UNESCO Global Learning City Network Jin Yang UNESCO Institute for Lifelong learning 27 March 2013 10/11/2014.

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Presentation on theme: "Lifelong Learning for All & UNESCO Global Learning City Network Jin Yang UNESCO Institute for Lifelong learning 27 March 2013 10/11/2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lifelong Learning for All & UNESCO Global Learning City Network Jin Yang UNESCO Institute for Lifelong learning 27 March /11/2014

2 The Faure Report (1972) Learning to Be: The World of Education Today and Tomorrow put forward the learning society concept 10/11/2014  Appealed to UNESCO Member States to re-organise their educational structures on 2 basic premises:  All agencies become providers of education  All citizens be engaged in learning, taking full advantages of the opportunities provided by the learning society

3 Delors Report: Learning: The Treasure Within (1996) 10/11/2014 The concept of learning throughout life leads straight on to that of a learning society which offers many and varied opportunities of learning, both at school and in economic, social and cultural life More collaboration and partnerships with families, industry and business, voluntary associations, people active in cultural life, etc

4 Lifelong learning for all UNESCO believes that advancing towards lifelong learning for all implies moving towards a ‘learning society’ in which each person is a ‘learner’ and at the same time a ‘source of learning’ and in which each individual will have the opportunity to learn what s/he wants when s/he wants 10/11/2014

5  The discourse of ‘lifelong learning’ as a ‘master concept for educational policies’ has been widely accepted;  Some pragmatic approaches have been adopted to make the visionary discourse of lifelong learning ‘handle-able’;  A learning society in a country can only be built province by province, city by city, community by community. Some basic conclusions drawn from previous research 10/11/2014

6  The building of a learning region/area is one of the practical or operational approaches;  The concept of a learning region/area can apply at all levels of local government, the main focus tends to be on cities 10/11/2014

7 Why cities?  Cities offer a more favourable setting to solve social and environmental problems  Cities generate jobs and income  Cities could deliver education, health care and other services more efficiently  Cities present opportunities for social mobilisation and women’s empowerment 10/11/2014

8 Urban and rural population of the world, Source: UN Population Division.

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11 The McKinsey Global Institute estimates that in India, cities will provide the overwhelming share of economic growth (70%), new jobs (70%), and tax revenues (85%) by 2030.McKinsey Global Institute 10/11/2014

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13 Why learning?  Cities with better-educated individuals have stronger economies;  In term of social inclusion or exclusion and learning, lower educational levels are associated, with unemployment;  Learning is critically important in a city’s efforts to attract and retain skilled and diverse workers;  Learning is crucial to improve the quality of life;  Cities in a globalised world cannot afford not to become learning cities (Longworth, 2010) 10/11/2014

14 Examples of learning cities around the world More than 1000 cities in the world have already become or are building Learning/Educating cities. The building of Learning/Educating Cities has become a considerable world-wide phenomenon. 10/11/2014

15  In 1990s, implement the European Lifelong Learning Initiative (ELLI)  In 1998 , started to promote Towards a European Learning Society (TELS)

16 In 1996, Liverpool declared itself to be a ‘City of Learning’ and the UK Learning Cities Network (LCN) was established. Now, LCN has 80 member cities and regions. United Kingdom

17 The national programme ‘Learning Regions - Providing Support for Networks’ was launched in 2001, which supported some 70 regions. 10/11/2014 Germany

18 Canada In 2003, Victoria set a goal of being a “leading learning community” by Vancouver aims to be a Learning City. St. John’s and Edmonton have made efforts to become learning communities. 10/11/2014

19 Australia Every state has its own government inspired and funded learning cities association. In Victoria, for example, all municipalities of more than 5,000 people are expected to belong to this and to pursue learning city policies. 10/11/2014

20 Japan In as early as 1979, the city of Kakegawa was declared the first Lifelong Learning City in Japan. Since then, the Japanese lifelong learning city project has been implemented as part of the policy for promoting lifelong learning by city/town/community units. 10/11/2014

21 Republic of Korea The Lifelong Education Law was enacted in 1999, which states that “government can designate and support selected municipalities, districts, and counties as lifelong learning cities”. In 2012, a total of 80 local governments were designated as ‘Lifelong Learning Cities’. 10/11/2014

22 South Africa In 2001, the Western Cape, one of the nine provinces in South Africa, started the ‘Learning Cape’ framework as one of the four key pillars for economic and social development. 10/11/2014

23 China During , the city of Beijing participated in the EU funded PALLACE project. In October 2011, more than 210 cities (districts and counties) in China organised the lifelong learning activities week, many of them have set up the goal for constructing learning cities. 10/11/2014

24 Viet Nam The national steering committee for building a learning society is in the process to develop the “National Scheme on Building a Learning Society in Viet Nam (2011 – 2020)” which proposes an initiative to pilot the building of learning provinces, learning cities, learning districts and learning communities. 10/11/2014

25 Definition of a learning city A Learning City is one which invests in quality lifelong learning for all in order to: –Promote inclusive learning from basic to higher education –Invest in the sustainable growth of its workplaces, –Re-vitalise the vibrant energy of its communities, –Nurture a culture of learning throughout life, –Exploit the value of local, regional and international partnerships, and –Guarantee the fulfillment of its environmental obligations. In so doing it will release the strength and capacity of all its resources for creating individual empowerment and cultural prosperity, social cohesion and economic prosperity, and sustainable development. 10/11/2014

26 UNESCO Initiative In response to Member States’ call to adopt a more pragmatic and instrumental approach to promoting lifelong learning, UNESCO/UIL plans to establish: UNESCO Global Learning Cities Network UNESCO GLCN With its Secretariat at the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong learning 10/11/2014

27 Overall aim UNESCO GLCN  To create a global platform to mobilise cities and demonstrate how to use effectively their resources in every sector to develop and enrich all their human potential to foster lifelong learning for all, to develop equality and social justice, to maintain harmonious social cohesion, and to create sustainable prosperity. 10/11/2014

28 Objectives Advocate lifelong learning for all; Facilitate research; Promote policy dialogue and peer learning; Serve as a clearing-house; Provide capacity development; Develop a Global Learning City Index; Monitor the implementation of the Index. Objectives of UNESCO GLCN 10/11/2014

29 The role of founding partners: Provide members of the International Consultative Committee for the Establishment of the UNESCO GLCN Contribute an initial grant if possible Mobilise cities to become members of the UNESCO GLCN 10/11/2014 Developing partnerships (2012): approached about 30 founding partners

30 Categories of founding partners: I.International and regional organisations/agencies II.Ministries of education of Member States III.International and non-governmental associations IV.Foundations and corporations V.Universities and other institutions VI.Cities 10/11/2014

31 Category I: International and regional organisations/agencies 10/11/2014 Founding Partner Committee member Funding UN–HABITAT The World Bank Arab Urban Development Institute (AUDI) Association for the Development of Education in Africa (ADEA) European Commission OECD

32 Category I: International and regional organisations/agencies 10/11/2014 Founding Partner Committee member Funding Organización de Estados Iberoamericanos para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura Organisation of American States (OAS)

33 Category II: Ministries of education of Member States 10/11/2014 Founding Partner Committee member Funding German Federal Ministry of Education and Research Ministry for Education and Science of Portugal Ministry of Education of China Ministry of Education, Science and Technology of the Republic of Korea Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology of Japan Ministry of Education and Training of Viet Nam Ministry of National Education of Turkey

34 Category III: International non-governmental associations 10/11/2014 Founding Partner Committee member Funding International Council of Adult Education International Association of Educating Cities Pascal Observatory

35 Category IV: Foundations and corporations 10/11/2014 Founding Partner Committee member Funding Cisco Systems Asia-Europe Foundation (ASEF) Bertelsmann Stiftung, Germany Qatar Foundation, Qatar Sun Wah Group, Hong Kong Microsoft Intel

36 Category IV: Foundations and corporations 10/11/2014 Founding Partner Committee member Funding J. P. Morgan Chase Foundation World Economic Forum

37 Category V: Universities and other institutions 10/11/2014 Founding Partner Committee member Funding Kuwait University Kuwait Cape Higher Education Consortium South Africa

38 Category VI: Cities 10/11/2014 Founding Member Committee member Funding Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, Germany Beijing Municipal City, China

39 A framework for the Global Learning City Index

40 Features of good indicators Ambitious but achievable: achieving the target should represent significant progress but should also be realistic Crucial - Every indicator reflects a value, a priority or a critical issue. Relevant – an indicator must fit the purpose we have it for; Achieving the target should contribute significantly to meeting a key objective. 10/11/2014J. YANG40

41 Clear and understandable – an indicator must be simple and easy for all stakeholders to understand, and should make sense to the average person. Easy to measure – an indicator should be measured by available data, or by data to be collected through a well-designed survey. Valid and reliable – people must trust the information that an indicator provides.

42 10/11/ Draw inspiration from the Human Develop Index:

43 43 A Vibrant Culture of Learning throughout Life A Vibrant Culture of Learning throughout Life Enhanced Quality and Excellence in Learning Extended Use of Modern Learning Technologies Effective Learning for and in the Workplace Effective Learning for and in the Workplace Revitalised Community Learning Revitalised Community Learning ‘Lifelong Learning for All is Our City’s Future.’ Inclusive Learning from Basic to Higher Education Inclusive Learning from Basic to Higher Education A Preliminary Framework of the UNESCO Global Learning City Index Wider benefits of building a learning city Major building blocks of a learning city Fundament al conditions for building a learning city

44 The Pediment: 3 areas of focus reflect the wider benefits or purposefulness of building a modern learning City: (1)Individual Empowerment and Social Cohesion; (2)Economic Development and Cultural Prosperity; (3)Sustainable Development.

45 The Columns – six areas of focus reflect the major building blocks of a learning city: (1) Inclusive learning from basic to higher education; (2) Revitalised community learning; (3) Effective learning for and in the workplace; (4) Extended use of modern learning technologies; (5) Enhanced quality and excellence in learning, and (6) A vibrant culture of learning throughout life.

46 The Foundational Steps - three areas of focus reflect the fundamental conditions for building a learning city (1) Vision, political will and commitment; (2) Governance and participation of all stakeholders; and (3) Mobilisation and utilisation of resources and potentials.

47 10/11/2014 The 1 st Global Learning City Conference October 2013 · Beijing

48 10/11/2014 Co-organisers, co-hosts and sponsors Co-organisersUNESCOMinistry of Education of China Beijing Municipal City Co-hostsUNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) National Commission of the People's Republic of China for UNESCO Beijing Municipal Education Commission SponsorsAll confirmed founding partners

49 10/11/2014 Dates? November 2013

50 Objectives The overall aim of the Conference: To create a platform to mobilise cities and demonstrate how to use their resources effectively in every sector to develop and enrich all their human potential for promoting lifelong learning for all, for developing equality and social justice, for maintaining harmonious social cohesion, and for creating sustainable prosperity. 10/11/2014

51 The objectives of the Conference: –To launch the establishment of the UNESCO GLCN; –To adopt the Beijing Declaration on Building Learning Cities; –To validate the UNESCO Global Learning Cities Index; and –To exchange best practices in building learning cities in the international community. 10/11/2014

52 Themes Lifelong learning for all: Inclusion, prosperity and sustainability in cities Make a case for building a learning city The building blocks of a learning city The major strategies for building a learning city

53 D p Mayors, chairs of city councils, chief executives of cities and directors of city education departments Representatives of founding partners and international agencies Experts and other stakeholders Total number of participants: 300 international 200 domestic 10/11/2014 Participants

54 10/11/2014 Road map November 2012: 2 nd International Consultative Meeting on Establishing the UNESCO GLCN organised in Hangzhou, China, co-hosted by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning and the Chinese National Commission for UNESCO December 2012: Preparatory meeting organized in Beijing, co- hosted by UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning and the Chinese National Commission for UNESCO, and the Beijing Municipal Education Commission March 2013: Conference venue and hotel selected by the Chinese National Commission for UNESCO, and the Beijing Municipal Education Commission April 2014: Host Country Agreement signed by representatives of UNESCO and the Ministry of Education of China

55 10/11/2014 May 2013: 2 nd International Consultative Meeting on Establishing the UNESCO GLCN organized in Seoul, the Republic of Korea, co-hosted by UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning and the National Institute for Lifelong Education (NILE) The UNESCO GLCN Website established by UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning The Conference Website established by Beijing Municipal Education Commission June 2013: Invitations to UNESCO Member States and international organisations/agencies dispatched by the Director-General of UNESCO

56 10/11/2014 September 2013: Registration for participation completed Conference agenda finalized October 2013: The draft Beijing Declaration on Building Learning Cities finalized and translated by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning The draft Global Learning City Index finalized and translated by the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning November 2013: Conference organised

57 Many thanks! Project Secretariat UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning Feldbrunnenstr Hamburg Germany Tel.: October


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