Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Mindy Folsom, Itinerant Teacher for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Lori Fitzgerald, Program Specialist for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Jefferson County Public Schools.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Mindy Folsom, Itinerant Teacher for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Lori Fitzgerald, Program Specialist for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Jefferson County Public Schools."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mindy Folsom, Itinerant Teacher for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Lori Fitzgerald, Program Specialist for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Jefferson County Public Schools

2 Karen L. Anderson & Kathleen A. Arnoldi  Audiologist and Teacher of the Deaf BUTTE Publications  Resources for all grade/age levels  Online Resources  Does include resources for students who sign  Designed for Deaf/HH students in the mainstream classroom  Great for Group Book Study

3 CHAPTER ONE

4  Enhanced my observations  What to look for in communication, participation, curriculum, and self-advocacy  Included a checklist for some specific things to look for in the observation  Observational Record of Behavior of Deaf and Hard of hearing Students  Provided more tools  Increased my feedback to the regular teacher

5  What to look for  Communication (p. 13, 17-19) How much does the student understand during instruction Ask Questions 70% is considered average listening comprehension for a student with typical hearing (1-12) What is the student’s level of interaction in the classroom? Observer should be seated in full view of the student’s face

6  What to look for  Participation (p. 13, 17-19) Is the student participating at rate similar to peers? What strategies or compensatory skills does the student utilize? How did the student utilize visual cues available during the lesson? What does the student do when there are learning breakdowns? How does the student understand and utilize social language in the integrated setting?

7  What to look for  Self-Advocacy (p. 17) What steps does the student take to ensure communication? What did the student do when there was a communication break down?  Included a checklist for some specific things to look for in the observation Predetermine what you are looking for Observational Record of Behavior of Deaf and Hard of hearing Students (p. 42)

8

9  Tools for D/HH Teacher  Checklist for during observation (p. 42)  Checklist for student’s listening difficulties  Checklists for screening, like the S.I.F.T.E.R. (p. 55)  Tools for Mainstream Teacher  CHAPS (p. 66)  Tools for Parents:  Parents observations of child’s listening difficulties C.H.I.L.D. (p. 50)  Tools for Student  The students can share when they have listening difficulty  ATCAT (p. 32)  LIFE-R (p. 61)  Long Term tools, including social interaction(p )  Social Interaction Checklist-Elementary  Can use for any reason, including IEP, Re-Evaluations, Initial placement, or dismissal

10 CHAPTER TWO

11  Several tools to help understand the effects of hearing loss on what speech the student doesn’t understand  Developmental Tools (p )  Some are complicated, complex, but in-depth (p. 121)  Some are simple  Phrases that are commonly used with 3-5 words  Some long, some short lists of 10 (p. 147)  Try in different environments With & Without Noise Near/Far With & without Personal Amplification Room with reverberation problems

12  Following Directions  Determining students’ ability to follow directions Key Words with Mr. Potato Head (p. 149)  Language of Directions: Hierarchy of Development Basic One Step (Take a white piece of paper) Basic Two Step (Pick up a book and give it to me) Expanded Two Step (Pick up the green car with three wheels and put it in the box) Complex Directions (Draw a red circle next to the blue square which has a green dots in the middle of it) With Quiet, Noise, Distance, etc….

13

14  Explain hearing loss to teachers & students like a puzzle with a limited number of pieces (p. 179)  Use examples with missing pieces to explain background noise too  Reduce background noise and improve classroom acoustics (p )  Consider both functional listening skills and the core content standards on listening when making IEP goals (p. 68, 79-88)  (Lots of Tips in Building Skills)

15 CHAPTER TWO

16  Improving auditory memory (p. 156)  Build on previously recalled sentences with numbers, letters, unrelated words, or sentences I I like I like to…..  I like to eat peanut butter and jelly sandwiches  Games with expanded Stories (I’m going to Grandma’s…)  Add a word to the middle  Simon says  Categories: The category is tools: Tell me all the tools you hear. Say “saw, hammer, doughnut, wrench”  Remember our directions

17 (p. 157)  I always did this with reading, but I didn’t do it with ________.  Jingles & Rhymes  Tell the children where you will visit, but you’ll only say half the word: I will visit the ___ark.  Finish the word (My favorite color is pur___)  Show a picture, but only say half the word— have the students say the whole word

18  Help improve students listening by preparing them with the amount of info they need to anticipate missing in different situations  Find ways to help students to understand their hearing loss (p )  Have them look at results (p )  Do age appropriate tasks where they can learn about what they do and do not hear  Help them recognize when they do not hear something clearly  Discuss hearing loss type (age appropriate language)  Help them to understand that just because they hear something, doesn’t mean that they heard it clearly

19 CHAPTER THREE & FOUR

20  Understand where a student’s conversational competence is at (p. 193)  Do they have good turn taking skills?  Do they shift/maintain topics appropriately?  Do they frequently repeat themselves?  This is typical of D/HH students  Testing Instruments (informal & formal)  S.C.R.I.P.T. (p )  Observations & anecdotal notes  Interpreters & teachers’ conversations  Checklists (p )  S.A.I.D. (p. 397)  Communication During Instruction ( )

21  Lesson’s on Responsibility of Communication (p ; also see chapter six for instructional communication)  Why do communication break downs happen?  Who is responsible to help fix broken communication?  How can we repair break downs in communication?  What are the rules of conversation?  What type of communicator am I? (Timid/Passive, Bossy/Aggressive, Self-Confident/Assertive?) (p. 219)  What communication does NOT help? (Bluffing, negative thinking, avoiding, escaping, denying, controlling conversation, etc…) (p.222)  How better communication can make a better friendship (p. 224)

22  Games with real life situations where people do not hear, and then looking at (p )  What kind of breakdown happened in this communication?  What can be done to remedy this situation?  Role play situations where student’s do not hear and what they do  EVERYONE experiences communication breakdowns! (p. 213)

23

24 CHAPTER SEVEN

25  Access to Instruction Checklist: evaluates student’s skills in the major areas of instructional language (All Grades) p. 458  Informal Inventory of Independence and Self-Advocacy Skills for DHH Students: addresses independence in several contexts, including the classroom, community and with peers (Grades 4+) p. 459 – 460  Mediated Communication: Student Readiness Checklists: evaluates student’s skills in accessing instruction through an interpreter, transliterator, notetaker, etc (Grades 4+) p. 461 – 462  Placement and Readiness Checklists for Students who are D/HH (PARC): checklists designed to assist IEP teams, including students, teachers, specialists, parents and school administrators, in making decisions about programming and placement for students with HL p. 463 (downloadable)  Checklist for Language of Directions – Skill Development: evaluative checklist to determine student’s skills following directions (Preschool +) p. 464 – 465  Language of Directions – Hierarchy of Development: a list in order of development of direction comprehension and an accompanying evaluative checklists (Preschool +) p. 466

26  Bumps Along the Road to Good Communication: developmental list of common words which have multiple meanings (Early Education +) p. 472 – 477  Common American Idioms: list of idioms most commonly found in everyday communication (Grades 2+) p. 478  Figurative Language: most common types of figurative language and their definitions (Grades 4+) p. 479  Supporting the Success of Students with HL: A Self- Checklist for Classroom Teachers: tool for teachers’ self- examination regarding creating accessible curriculum, instruction, and learning (All Grades) p. 468

27  Question-Answer Routines (All Grades) p. 481  Language of Directions (All Grades) p. 482  Environmental Print (All Grades) p. 483  Test Taking (All Grades) p. 484  Classroom Rituals and Routines (Primary) p. 485  Textbooks (All Grades) p. 486  Paper-and-Pencil Assignments (All Grades) p. 487  Using Mediated Communication in the Classroom (All Grades) p. 488  The School Principal’s Role in Ensuring Access: handout for principals regarding what they can do as building administrators to ensure instructional and curricular access for all students (All Grades) p. 489  Family Information and Activities  Conquering Figurative Language: quick activity using nursery rhymes to exemplify figures of speech p. 491 – 492  Making Sense of Idioms: activities to define idiomatic phrases by their context and use them in sentences (Primary) p

28  Conquering Figurative Language: quick activity using nursery rhymes to exemplify figures of speech p. 491–492  Making Sense of Idioms: activities to define idiomatic phrases by their context and use them in sentences (Primary) p. 493–494

29  Teasing  p  Self Concept  Chapter 5  Understanding Your Hearing Loss/Peer Relationships  p  Self Advocacy  Understand-O-Meter (p. 415)  Chapter six  Classroom Teacher’s Self-Evaluation  A quick checklist for teachers to self-evaluate their support of the student (p. 468)


Download ppt "Mindy Folsom, Itinerant Teacher for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Lori Fitzgerald, Program Specialist for Deaf/Hard of Hearing Jefferson County Public Schools."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google