Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Human Resources - The Safety Program Human Resources - The Safety Program The Human Side & The Business Side Presenter: Ms. Colleen Leaf, Human Resources.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Human Resources - The Safety Program Human Resources - The Safety Program The Human Side & The Business Side Presenter: Ms. Colleen Leaf, Human Resources."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Human Resources - The Safety Program Human Resources - The Safety Program The Human Side & The Business Side Presenter: Ms. Colleen Leaf, Human Resources Mgr. Akwesasne Housing Authority

3 In today’s world of economic changes and funding cutbacks, many housing authorities have been forced to cut programs and services provided to the community. The development of a safety program is one way of cutting costs and managing available funding.

4 AHA Structure Akwesasne Housing Authority employs their own construction crews that are tasked with building homes from the ground up. These crews consist of: Laborers Carpenters Electricians Plumbers Heavy Equipment Operator Crew Leaders Inspector Construction Foreman/Code Officer Managers

5 With such a diversified work force, AHA needed to implement a safety program to manage the risks inherent with residential construction. The program also needed to address the safety of office personnel, as well as fire drills and emergency evacuation procedures for our senior apartment complexes.

6 Planning AHA management team convened to determine the following: Was there a need for a safety program? Would such a program be cost effective? Pros and cons of the safety program? What department would be responsible for development, implementation and enforcement?

7 Human Resource Role Administrative Administrative  Record keeping and compliance. Operational Operational  Maintaining a productive work environment for all employees. Strategic Strategic  Policy development and pro-active employment practices. The development of a safety policy falls within HR’s realm of responsibility.

8 Fact Tribal housing authorities stand to benefit in two ways through the implementation of an effective safety program !!

9 Benefits The human factor The human factor:  Promoting a stronger more viable work force through protection and management of human resources. The business factor The business factor:  Promoting a stronger more efficient housing authority through loss control and management of financial resources.

10 Human Factors Human Factors Employees are our most important asset Employees are our most important asset!!!

11 Human Factors (cont’d) Human Factors (cont’d) Preservation of employee safety and health must have top priority. Production is secondary to safety. Any safety and health program must have total employee involvement. Organizations promote good will by sending the message “We value our employees”. When an organization is well managed, employees benefit (professionally and financially).

12 THIS SHOULD BE WHY WE HELP OUR EMPLOYEES WORK SAFE!

13 End Results of a Safety Program End Results of a Safety Program A healthier and a more productive work force. A healthier and a more productive work force. Skilled workers trained to do the job the right way. Lower workers’ compensation insurance costs. Safety hazards identified in a timely manner. Reduced medical expenditures. Less money spent for overtime benefits. Reduced turnover. Efficient utilization of human resources.

14 Company Image Employers have a moral obligation to provide a safe and healthful work place. Employers have a moral obligation to provide a safe and healthful work place. A good safety program is an excellent marketing tool. No one wants to work for a company that has little or no regard for their employees.

15 Basic Safety Program Guidelines Obtain management commitment. Obtain management commitment.. Build trust. Conduct self assessments. Develop a site safety vision. Develop a system of accountability and measures. Provide awareness training. Continually measure, communicate results and celebrate successes.

16 Safety Program Requirements DO : Recognize that management leadership and commitment is the motivating force behind a successful safety program. Recognize that management leadership and commitment is the motivating force behind a successful safety program.

17 Safety Program Requirements (cont’d) DO : Allow employees a voice. Promote employee involvement by encouraging identification of existing or potential hazards. Provide PPE and required training. Consistently review policy for effectiveness and update required components.

18 Required PPE Hard hats– supplied Safety glasses – supplied Ear plugs/Ear muffs – supplied Body harness/Fall Protection Equipment – supplied Work boots

19 AHA FIELD MANAGERS

20 Safety Program Pitfalls Safety Program Pitfalls Do not send mixed messages or be inconsistent.  Once policy is established, stick with it. Do not minimize the importance of employee input. Do not place productivity before employee safety. Do not allow employees to use malfunctioning tools. Do not consistently operate in reactive mode.  Be pro-active by planning and assessing risks.

21 “Once the pin has been pulled, the grenade is no longer our friend.”

22 CAUTION Implementing a safety program requires change, which can often be met with resistance.

23 Possible problem areas include: Total commitment  From entry level employees to the top of the corporate ladder. Personal Protective Equipment  Complaints it is too hot; too bulky; gets in the way. Consistent enforcement  Including disciplinary action when required.

24 Working to a successful end AHA implemented a safety policy in Positive results have been realized!  Workers compensation claims are down 58% since  Initial set up costs have been offset by decreased operating costs.  Workers compensation premium has been reduced.  More effective communication between field personnel and management.

25 Worker’s Compensation Direct and Indirect Cost of Injuries

26 Workplace Injuries Each year, more than 6,000 employees die in the workplace. Each year, more than 6,000 employees die in the workplace. 50,000 more die from illnesses caused by workplace hazards. An average of 17 workers die on the job each day. These injuries create an estimated direct and indirect costs of $155.5 billion annually, that’s almost 3% of the US gross domestic product.

27 Types of Incidents There are10 types of incidents that generate the vast majority of costs (86.9%) associated with disabling workplace injuries. ◦ Overexertion ◦ Fall on same level ◦ Fall to lower level ◦ Bodily motion (i.e. slipping and falling) ◦ Struck by object ◦ Highway incident

28 Types of Incidents (cont.) ◦ Caught in or compressed by machinery ◦ Repetitive motion ◦ Struck against object ◦ Assaults/violent acts

29 Statistics – Workplace injuries An employee who files a claim for lost time is twice as likely to file another claim within 3 years. 26% of employees with a prior claim and who remain with the same firm will file another claim in the future. 50% of second claims filed are for back injuries.

30 Direct Costs Are just the tip of the iceberg. Insurance pays most of these costs. The total annual direct cost of workplace injuries was $51.8 billion dollars in  Includes workers compensation payments.  Medical expenses.  Civil liability damages.  Litigation expenses.

31 Indirect Costs Indirect costs can be the deal breakers. Hidden costs – uninsured, unbudgeted You pay all of these. Some examples include:  Damage to equipment the worker might have been using.  Lost time by injured worker.  Training a substitute worker.  Loss of efficiency.

32 Indirect Costs (cont.) Internal Management time ◦ Safety person –  Investigates the claim – for safety reasons.  Prepares a report. ◦ Manager  Is involved in the claim notification process.  Has to address staffing issues.  Monitors replacement personnel to ensure departmental standards are followed.

33 Indirect Costs (cont.) Claims Management ◦ Required to monitor claim ◦ Compile data and report trends Employee Cost ◦ Pain and discomfort ◦ Time waiting for care ◦ Travel time to various medical providers ◦ Delay in wages

34 Indirect Costs (cont.) Easy to forget about because they are hard to measure. Easy to forget about because they are hard to measure. The cost of worker’s compensation can be dwarfed by the indirect costs associated with the injury. OSHA estimates they run between 1 and 4.5 times direct costs!

35 Risk Management Properly manage the risk of your workplace to prevent accidents. Hire the right kind of employees. Know the risks inherent to your workplace and have plans in place to manage them. Maintain a safe workplace. Be known as a fair employer. Have a healthy workforce. Get proper care for injured employees.

36 Summary Akwesasne Housing Authority is committed to the preservation of employee safety and health in every phase of our business. Since implementing our safety program we have seen positive results. If interested in a template of our safety program, please contact: x 107


Download ppt "Human Resources - The Safety Program Human Resources - The Safety Program The Human Side & The Business Side Presenter: Ms. Colleen Leaf, Human Resources."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google