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InspiredGiving Using Stories to Increase Donations © Karen Dietz, Just Story It! December 2011. All rights reserved. 1.

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Presentation on theme: "InspiredGiving Using Stories to Increase Donations © Karen Dietz, Just Story It! December 2011. All rights reserved. 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 InspiredGiving Using Stories to Increase Donations © Karen Dietz, Just Story It! December 2011. All rights reserved. 1

2 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Advantages If you learn what I am about to show you, you will avoid: Sounding like everyone else Disengaged audiences Donors not knowing the return on their investments Not being able to demonstrate the impact of your work 2

3 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Why Fundraising Projects Fail (Content) Deadened by data People avoiding you (guilt, pain, pity) Sounding like everyone else Being easily forgettable Developing only short-term relationships 3

4 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. The Difference Nonprofit fundraising researchNonprofit fundraising research We are all in the connection businessWe are all in the connection business 4

5 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. What This Means For You 1. 1.Youll get better at sharing stories 2. 2.More impact & memorability 3. 3.You will have greater success with your fundraising projects 4. 4.Youll engage donors in deeper and more meaningful ways 5. 5.Youll have a stronger foundation for building longer-term relationships 5

6 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Goal To connect, inspire, & influence on purpose 6

7 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Enrolled Let me write you a check! I want to join! I cant wait to volunteer! 7

8 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. 8 What Makes Stories Work?

9 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. 9 No one ever marched on Washington because of charts, graphs, or bullet points

10 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. The Brain Left Brain: AnalyticLinearLogicalLanguageReasoningSkeptical #s & Facts Emotionally Neutral Needs More Info Right Brain: SensoryRelationalImaginativeNon-verbalIntuition Social Cognition Fills Gaps Emotionally Engaged Path to Limbic Limbic: the Emotional Brain Where decisions are made Feelings of trust, loyalty, hope 10

11 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Making Decisions People make emotional decisions with logical reasonsPeople make emotional decisions with logical reasons When people hear stories, they typically feel safe, relaxed, and anticipate enjoymentWhen people hear stories, they typically feel safe, relaxed, and anticipate enjoyment 11

12 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. 12 Your Brain on Stories

13 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. 13 Two Brains on Stories

14 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. 14 Your Brain on Data

15 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. So How Do You Do THAT? People give because they are emotionally touched and feel connected to the stories 1.Listen for stories 2.Tell your stories 15

16 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Story Process Finding Digging Selecting Crafting Sharing/ Embodying Media – oral, written, audio, video, graphics, icon 16

17 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. What Stories? 1.Your founding & the challenge you are addressing 2.People & results 3.The future your are creating 4.Whats my passion & commitment? 17

18 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Why Some Stories Fail 1. 1.They are not stories 2. 2.Right story, wrong audience 3. 3.Poorly crafted stories -- Being easily forgettable, not a strong message 4. 4.Evoking undesirable emotions that remain unresolved 5. 5.Not having a clear purpose 6. 6.Poor delivery 7. 7.Not building bridges/ understanding between people/groups 18

19 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Common Mistakes 1. 1.Not using authentic stories 2. 2.Telling ABOUT a story 3. 3.Not having a strong beginning 4. 4.Not having a powerful key message or focused ending 5. 5.Not including action steps 6. 6.Lack of sensory material 7. 7.Not practicing with a partner 8. 8.Not finding opportunities for sharing them orally 19

20 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Narratives Anything written or told in sentence and paragraph form Information Based Essays Diaries Letters Articles Textbooks Directives Encyclopedia entries Briefs Lectures PowerPoint All are narratives, some may be stories. Only a story is a story. Plot-based event descriptions I went to the store. I brought some bread. I walked home. Stories Personal Stories Tales Legends Movies, Plays Books 20

21 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Crafting a Compelling Story Sharing a personal experience 1. 1.Where were you? What was the setting? Who was there? 2. 2.What is the problem you faced? 3. 3.What were the challenges you faced? 4. 4.How did you feel? 5. 5.What happened? What happened next? 6. 6.How was the problem resolved? 7. 7.How did you feel then? 8. 8.What is the lesson? Whats the message of the story? 21

22 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Essential Story Elements Every compelling story has: 1. 1.Identifiable character(s), Goal/Motivation 2. 2.Beginning, middle, end (set the stage + tell us what happened + a point) 3. 3.Problem resolution 4. 4.Challenges/trouble/struggle 5. 5.Key message 6. 6.Sensory material (includes emotions) 7. 7.Authenticity & urgency & call to action 22

23 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Structures to Use Whats the most elementary structure to use? 23

24 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Simple Story Structures – context, challenge, action, result, lessonCCARL – context, challenge, action, result, lesson --- problem, action, result, learning, applicationPARLA --- problem, action, result, learning, application – situation, obstacle, action, results, evaluationSHARE – situation, obstacle, action, results, evaluation – situation, challenge, action, results- quantified, evaluationSCARQE – situation, challenge, action, results- quantified, evaluation 24

25 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Version 1 -- Morton A case manager met with her client, Morton, on a bench in Harvard Square. Morton pointed to a window in Harvard Yard and said, That was my dorm room. He had graduated from Harvard earning a law degree. Mental illness led to alcoholism and then homelessness. Crescent helped Morton move into affordable elder housing. Today he is successfully managing his health challenges.

26 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Version 2 -- Morton One day Jane, a Crescent case manager, met with her client Morton, on a bench in Harvard Square. Morton pointed to a window in Harvard Yard and said, That was my dorm room. Jane was stunned to learn that the older disheveled unshaven man wearing donated clothes and holes in his shoes had graduated from Harvard, earned a law degree, and been a successful lawyer. But over the years, stress had taken its toll. Mental illness crept in, led to alcoholism, the loss of his career and family, and then to utter homelessness. With Janes assistance, Crescent helped get Morton stabilized, move into affordable elder housing and volunteer at Crescent to help others like himself. Today, he is successfully managing his health challenges, working part time, and helping other homeless men transition off the streets. Without Crescent, Morton says, Id be lost or dead. I certainly wouldnt be able to help others like I do. I get to pay it forward every day now. You too can help others like Morton. (CCARL)

27 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. What Are Desirable Emotions? Respect & dignity Hope Triumph Redemption Self-discovery, group identification Determination/persistence Joy Calm Courage Love Excitement 27

28 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Evaluation Questions 1. 1.Are you sharing a personal experience or are you telling about a story? 2. 2.Does the story told sustain individual/group identities or help to build bridges? 3. 3.In telling a story are we making the unfamiliar familiar (sense- making)? 28

29 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Evaluation Questions 4. 4.Does the story help us comprehend changes that disrupt our routines/sense of self? 5. 5.Does the story create understanding? 6. 6.Is the story about a particular event that speaks to a general principal or universal truth? 7. 7.Does the story create a feeling of personal empowerment on the part of the listener that they can help? 29

30 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Evoking Stories From Others 1.Model a story 2.Use story prompts 3.Avoid asking information / description questions 4.Use all youve learned about crafting stories to guide you in asking for what you want to hear 30

31 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Common Mistakes -- Evoking 1. 1.Thinking its about storytelling instead of story sharing 2. 2.Not modeling a story 3. 3.Asking information questions 4. 4.Not asking reflective questions 5. 5.Not using prompts that evoke a story 6. 6.Not using the power of groups 7. 7.Ethical breaches – lack of validation or permission 31

32 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Ethics Everyone has a story to tellEveryone has a story to tell RespectRespect PermissionsPermissions 32

33 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Stories Into Media 1. 1.Oral 2. 2.Written 3. 3.Audio 4. 4.Video 5. 5.Poster 6. 6.Icon What do you gain and lose in each media? 33

34 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Applying Stories Where else can I apply stories? 1. 1.Fund raising 2. 2.Donor relations 3. 3.Board relations 4. 4.Member relations 5. 5.Website 6. 6.Emails 7. 7.Direct mail 8. 8.Presentations & Events When do you NOT tell stories? 34

35 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Taking Action 1.Identify your organizations core stories 2.Outline 3.Key message 4.Identify emotions 5.Create an image deck 6.Practice practice practice 35

36 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved. Supporting Materials Just Story It Website – www.juststoryit.com 1.PPT & Recording 2.Narrative Forms Chart 3.Essential Elements Checklist 4.Core Stories Worksheet 5.Story Listening Worksheet 6.Articles 36

37 © Karen Dietz, Polaris Associates Consulting, Inc. August 2010. All rights reserved.Contact Karen Dietz, PhD Just Story It! San Diego, CA 92102 619-235-0052 www.juststoryit.com j juststoryit@gmail.com Karen is an organizational development professional specializing in stories. She is a business consultant, facilitator, trainer, storyteller, story coach to senior executives, and the former Executive Director of the National Storytelling Network. She has worked with organizations for over 25 years, and clients include Fortune 500 companies, business leaders, nonprofits, and community advocates. 37


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