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Page 1 © 2008 © www.thinkintrepid.com HOW DO YOU KNOW WHAT KIND OF EXPERIENCE YOU REALLY DELIVER? AN OVERVIEW PREPARED FOR: Its Not Magic | Woburn Safari.

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Presentation on theme: "Page 1 © 2008 © www.thinkintrepid.com HOW DO YOU KNOW WHAT KIND OF EXPERIENCE YOU REALLY DELIVER? AN OVERVIEW PREPARED FOR: Its Not Magic | Woburn Safari."— Presentation transcript:

1 Page 1 © 2008 © HOW DO YOU KNOW WHAT KIND OF EXPERIENCE YOU REALLY DELIVER? AN OVERVIEW PREPARED FOR: Its Not Magic | Woburn Safari Park | June 2008 [CONFIDENTIAL}

2 Page 2 © 2008 If something gets to be a billion-dollar brand, there is more going on than just a rational attachment. My feeling is that all the billion-dollar brands occupy a very special place among some consumers Jim Strengel, Global Marketing Officer, P&G

3 Page 3 © 2008 WHAT CAN YOU FOCUS ON? SOMETHING ELSE? The whole customer ecosystem Making emotive connections with people Beyond your customers LOYALTY Rooted in the existing customer base & retention of that base is around calculative or value based drivers SATISFACTION Measurement & understanding is based around quality perceptions and focuses on specific experiences & transactions

4 Page 4 © 2008 Page 4 © 2008 Customer propensity to try new things… defend you… recommend you… overlook mistakes… give you feedback to help you improve… participate & contribute… support others to help them get more out using your products and services HOW DO YOU KNOW YOURE DOING WELL?

5 Page 5 © 2008 Page 5 © 2008 SOME CUSTOMER MEASUREMENT DATA Likelihood to defend the brand (Top ratings) Likelihood to repurchase (Top ratings) Virgin Nintendo Direct Line Dell Sony AOL John Lewis Gap BA Average Hilton O2 Egg Sky NatWest British Gas Currys Digital Tesco Microsoft Compete on priceFocus on service Sell experiences Dont compete: lock customers in Source : Intrepid Customer Experience Benchmarking Survey 2007

6 Page 6 © 2008 Page 6 © 2008 Customers influenced through tools to better understand products and services. This is where the customer experience is not driven by experience or emotion but on a needs based push or pull premise. SATISFIED Influencing customers to engage with your products is important but given many options would it be enough to get them to stay? Customers driven by basic level determiners. This is where the customer experience and repeat purchase is driven by basic factors such as price, convenience and proximity CALCULATIVE Would people hesitate to switch to another cut-price airline offering a cheaper price? Or a new convenience store closer to home? Customers are encouraged to remain loyal through a focus on repeat purchase behaviour Driving loyalty is increasingly difficult to achieve based on brand alone. If your customer has enrolled in similar loyalty programs with 3 of your competitors is it really driving loyalty? LOYAL Customers have an emotive connection with these brands that goes beyond the product based experience. The experience is NOT just linked to the product. This is where customers love their interactions with a company and eagerly refer others If Starbucks no longer offered the 11 th coffee for free would customers really leave them? EMOTIONALLY CONNECTED

7 Page 7 © 2008 DNA OF SUCCESSFUL CUSTOMER EXPERIENCES Identity Involvement Knowledge Belonging Performance IDENTITY Helps establish and communicate desired social status in a way that coincides with a persons own values, beliefs and principles, thereby enabling them to achieve important current and future personal life-goals and priorities BELONGING Places and times that I can interact with people of like-mind to exchange and co-create knowledge and experiences of the brand, or passion, we share. Creating a feeling of emotional security and clear membership boundaries that differentiate from other interest groups KNOWLEDGE Access to specialised and privileged information and resources that deepen my understanding, experience and admiration for the values of the brand PERFORMANCE A trusted reputation in delivering on its quality standards and promises (functional, aesthetic and social), providing a unique, stimulating product and service experience that I cannot find anywhere else INVOLVEMENT Anticipation and enjoyment from interacting regularly with the brand, developing a familiarity and ongoing human and personal dialogue that is valued

8 Page 8 © 2008 SOMEPRACTICE

9 Page 9 © 2008 WHICH IS THE ODD ONE OUT?

10 Page 10 © 2008 MARKETEERS HAVE GENERATED 000S OF DEFINITIONS FOR CUSTOMER INSIGHT… A fresh and not yet obvious understanding of customer beliefs, values, habits, desires, motives, emotions or needs and can become the basis for competitive advantage (Kellogg School of Management) Penetrating discovery about consumer motivations that can be applied to drive growth (Diageo)

11 Page 11 © 2008 Page 11 © 2008 CUSTOMER INSIGHTS – WHAT WE KNOW They re not immediately apparent They often come from unusual sources They re often discovered accidentally They can be rooted in observed anomalies They are NOT a number, a fact or a quote from a customer Do not in themselves drive competitive advantage

12 Page 12 © 2008 FROM DATA TO…. Data Information Data analysis and reduction Findings Carefully considering project objectives Insights Interpretation of findings Innovation New understanding that is actionable and competitively unique This is your challenge

13 Page 13 © 2008 WHERES THE VALUE? Information Think Gartner reports. Information informs but offers no indication of relative importance to a business Findings Selected information that is of interest, but lacking in implications Insights Fresh understanding of your customers or markets Think database extracts… Data Innovation Of most value because it offers new ways of doing things that lead to competitive advantage

14 Page 14 © 2008 There are dangers in treating customers as fonts of all wisdom, especially where the future is concerned Why?: Customers ideas can be incremental Customer contexts mean their feedback is rooted in what they know rather than what is happening in the world Because they focus on what they think is doable Asking people to tell us what they want tends to screw up what they think they want Because they often get it wrong! CAN CUSTOMERS INNOVATE FOR US?

15 Page 15 © 2008

16 Page 16 © 2008 Findings Selected information that is of interest, but lacking in implications Data Think database extracts… Information Think Gartner reports. Information informs but offers no indication of relative importance to a business Insight New learning about your customers or markets Innovation The basis for competitive advantage Ethnographic outputs Primary or traditional research Raw internal workshop outputs Parallel worlds or competitors A one line idea or challenge Fuel This is still your challenge

17 Page 17 © 2008 A one line idea or challenge Insights from… GETTING FROM INSIGHT TO INNOVATION Parallel worlds or competitors Raw internal workshop outputs Primary or traditional research Ethnographic outputs

18 Page 18 © 2008 ANEXERCISE

19 Page 19 © 2008 MAKING INNOVATION ACCESSIBLE – CREATE INNOVATION FILTERS BRAINSTORMING OR THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX? CREATE YOUR OWN INNOVATION FILTERS TO CHALLENGE YOUR INSIGHTS

20 Page 20 © 2008 What would need to happen to the product if customers were charged 20GBP per month in charges?


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