Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Meeting Survivors’ Needs: A Multi-State Study of Survivors’ Experiences with Domestic Violence Programs’ Non-Residential Services and Supports NCADV/NOMAS.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Meeting Survivors’ Needs: A Multi-State Study of Survivors’ Experiences with Domestic Violence Programs’ Non-Residential Services and Supports NCADV/NOMAS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Meeting Survivors’ Needs: A Multi-State Study of Survivors’ Experiences with Domestic Violence Programs’ Non-Residential Services and Supports NCADV/NOMAS Conference July 24, 2012 Eleanor Lyon & Anne Menard

2 Study Overview Study Overview Collaboration between the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence and the UConn School of Social Work Federal funding by the Family Violence Prevention & Services Administration office of DHHS; administered by National Institute of Justice Collaboration with DV Coalitions & programs across 4 states and within 4 culturally-specific organizations who have a national presence Methodology: Two phases of outreach & data collection -- surveys and focus groups

3 Study Goals Learn more about what domestic violence survivors want when they come to programs for supportive services, the extent to which survivors have had their service expectations met, and survivors’ assessment of immediate outcomes associated with the services they receive. Learn more about how survivors’ experiences, needs and immediate outcomes vary across demographic and domestic violence program characteristics. Identify multi-level factors associated with survivors’ positive service experiences. Develop recommendations for domestic violence programs across the country for how they might improve their services.

4 Survey Methodology Collaborated with DV Coalitions & programs across 4 states:  Alabama  Illinois  Massachusetts  Washington Collaborated with 4 culturally-specific DV organizations & their associated programs across the nation:  Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence (APIIDV)  Casa de Esperanza  Institute on Domestic Violence in the African American Community (IDVAAC)  Women of Color Network (WOCN) Recruited 90 DV programs who distributed the survey to survivors with 2+ contacts over a 9 month period (April – December 2010)

5 Surveys 2 surveys: one for programs, one for survivors Survivor survey modified from DOW, FVPSA outcomes, & shelter study Piloted with survivors in English & Spanish Outcomes: information, self-efficacy & affect Translated into 10 languages: Arabic, Chinese, French, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese

6 Participating DV Programs Program Features Avg.Range Number (#) of program staff (med. = 13) # of FTEs (full-time equivalents) – # of volunteers per month (med. = 7.5) Starting salary: Advocate$28,881$19 - $38,000 # of persons receiving services within past year1,21326 – 8,519 Years program has been in existence Program Description % Dual program: Domestic violence & sexual assault27.9% Culturally-specific program 27.5% Program offers both shelter & non-residential services78.7% Program receives FVPSA funding (10 no response; 5 DK)65.0%

7 Participating DV Programs: Languages Spoken by Program Staff & Volunteers American Sign Language Amharic Arabic Bangla/Bengali Bosnian Bulgarian Cambodian/Khmer Cantonese Cape Verdean/Criuolo Creole Croatian English Farsi French German Gurajati Haitian Creole Hebrew Hindi Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Kurdish Laotian Malayalam Mandarin Mien Nepali Polish Portuguese Punjabi Russian Samoan Serbian Setswana Sinhala Somali Spanish Tagalog Tai-Pan Tamil Telugu Thai Ukrainian Urdu Vietnamese Yoruba

8 Survey: Language Completed In Survey: Language Completed In LanguageN = 1466Percent Arabic6.4% Chinese13.9% English % Korean161.1% Portuguese151.0% Russian6.4% Spanish % Vietnamese231.6%

9 Demographics: Race/Ethnicity Demographics: Race/Ethnicity Total % 4 states% CS African American/Black African Asian/Asian American Hispanic/Latino-a Middle Eastern Multi-Racial2.6 Native American/Alaska Native Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander White/Caucasian Other

10 Demographics: Age & Education Demographics: Age & Education Age N =1416% 17 or >896.3% % % % % % % Over % Highest Level of Education N =1407% 8 th grade or less % 9 th – 11 th % High School Grad. or GED % Some college % College Grad % Advanced Degree594.2%

11 Demographics: Gender & Sexual Orientation Demographics: Gender & Sexual Orientation GenderN = 1417% Female % Male604.2% Transgender20.1% Sexual OrientationN = 1295% Heterosexual % Lesbian/Gay201.4% Bisexual362.5% Other251.7%

12 Demographics: History in U.S. N = 1262% I came to the U.S. from another country % At least one of my parents came to the U.S. from another country 695.5% At least one of my grandparents came to the U.S. from another country % My ancestors were here before my grandparents were born % I came to the U.S. from another country, and I am a…. N = 525% Refugee 326.1% Immigrant % Other %

13 Demographics: Disability & Financial Situation Do you consider yourself to have a disability or disabling condition(s)? N = 1317% Yes27721% No104079% Current financial situation: N = 1333% I simply can’t pay my bills % I have trouble paying regular bills % I can pay my bills but a big expense would cause a hardship % I can easily pay my bills, but need to be careful % I do not worry about paying for things I want and need %

14 Top 10 Sources: First Heard about DV Program Total4 statesCS 1.Friend(s) *19%17%25% 2. DV staff, including other DV program *17%19%12% 3.Police *16%17%11% 4. People at court *13%15%7% 5. Family member11% 6. Social service agency staff, incl. homeless shelter8% 7% 7. Mental health counselor/therapist *7%8%4% 8. Other specify: School *6%2%18% 9. Flyer/brochure/poster6% 10. Health care provider5%6%4%

15 Types of Services Currently Being Used 75% 57% 56% 36%

16 Differences in Services Currently Being Used by Race/Ethnicity Support Group Mean of total sample = 57% % African American61.5% Asian41.4% Hispanic60.3% White/Caucasian56.3% Support Services Mean of total sample = 75% % African American79.0% Asian81.3% Hispanic80.0% White/Caucasian70.3% Counseling Mean of total sample = 56% % African American56.0% Asian73.8% Hispanic53.8% White/Caucasian55.0% Legal Mean of total sample = 36% % African American22.4% Asian62.2% Hispanic47.9% White/Caucasian29.3%

17 Differences in Services Currently Being Used By Whether Born In or Outside U.S. Support Group Mean of total sample = 57% % Born outside the U.S. 60.1% U.S. born 54.2% Support Services Mean of total sample = 75% % Born outside the U.S. 82.5% U.S. born 70.3% Counseling Mean of total sample = 56% % Born outside the U.S. 59.4% U.S. born 53.3% Legal Mean of total sample = 36% % Born outside the U.S. 48.9% U.S. born 26.7%

18 Top 10: Services & Supports Wanted % of US born % of born not US 1. Talking to someone who understands my situation Support to make decisions and changes in my life Finding out who to call or where to get help Learning more about why/how DV happens Information about counseling options Help being safe from the person abusing me Hearing what other people have done in similar situations. * Help staying in my community safely Information about my legal rights and options Help with access to legal services

19 Additional Services & Supports Wanted Type of Help and Ranking Out of 54 % of US born % of born not US 14. Help with previous/other forms of abuse * Help staying in my relationship safely * Help with grief related to family losses * Help with mental health services Help getting housing Help for the person who hurt me Help with reproductive/women’s health issues * Help with job/job training Help with immigration-related issues * Help with substance abuse services

20 Help Staying in Relationship Safely: A Closer Look More likely to be born outside the US, have less trouble paying bills, & better off now than 2 years ago Report more average needs: information & support, child-related, safety, personal support & immigration-related Want more: help for person who hurt them, stopping court case, AND help ending relationship

21 Types of Services Sought for Children Percentage based on those who sought at least one (n=818) % of US born % of born not US 1. Help with counseling for my children. 63%61% 2. Help with other (local/state/federal) benefits for my children. 57%61% 3. Help related to custody of my children. 59%58% 4. Help maintaining safe visitation with my children. 58%53% 5. Help with children related to their abuse. 55%50% 6. Help with child protection hearing or requirements. 42% 7. Help with child care. * 38%45% 8. Help with child support. 38%44% 9. Help with health care for my children. * 33%44% 10. Help meeting the needs related to my child’s disability. 17%14%

22 11 Factors: Services & Supports Wanted a = more by US born; b = more by born outside US % Who Wanted 1 or More 1. Information/support needs (6 items) 93% 2. Safety needs (4 items) 88% 3. Legal advocacy needs (4 items) 76% 4. Child-related needs (9 items) – b 65% 5. Economic needs (7 items) 59% 6. Victimization-related needs (2 items) - a 57% 7. Family-related needs (3 items) - b 57% 8. Physical/mental health needs (4 items) -b 51% 9. Criminal legal needs (3 items) 32% 10. Immigration-related needs (5 items) - b 30% 11. Vulnerability-related needs (3 items) -a 24%

23 Total Number of Services Wanted by Demographic Features (overall mean = 22.18) Current Financial Status Mean I simply can’t pay my bills23.96 I have trouble paying my bills I can pay regular expenses, but a big expense would cause a hardship I can easily pay my bills I do not worry about paying for things I want and need History in U.S. Mean Born outside the U.S U.S. born20.65 Ability to speak English Mean Not at all24.52 Not well23.97 Okay24.85 Well23.26 Very well21.20 Significant Predictors Less completed education Younger age Close: Less ability to speak English More financial difficulty

24 Top 10: Services & Supports Received Top 10: Services & Supports Received Scale: 3: I got all of the help of this kind that I wanted 2: I got some of the help of this kind that I wanted 1: I wanted this kind of help but didn’t get any Average 1. Talking to someone who understands my situation Finding out who to call or where to get help Learning more about why/how DV happens Help being safe from the person abusing me Support to make decisions and changes in my life Help with translation/interpretation Help staying in my relationship safely Information about counseling options Help staying in my community safely Help with protective or restraining order.2.73

25 Top 10: Services & Supports Wanted but NOT Received * Percentage who wanted this kind of help, but reported they didn’t get any %* Overall % who wanted service 1. Help learning to drive.28.9%9.1% 2. Help with a job or job training.28.5%26.9% 3. Help paying rent/utilities.25.5%37.8% 4. Help with cash assistance/vouchers.22.6%36.8% 5. Help for the person who hurt me.21.0%31.8% 6. Help with transportation.20.9%29.4% 7. Help with financial matters, such as budgeting.20.3%33.4% 8. Help with child support.19.1%26.5% 9. Help with contacting family who are far away.18.8%19.0% 10. Help getting housing.18.7%35.9%

26 Satisfaction with Services & Supports Satisfaction with Services & Supports

27 Survivor Outcomes Percentage who said “yes”, the statement describes how they feel. [a = higher for Culturally Specific program] % I feel more hopeful about the future. – a95.4% I know more ways to plan for my safety.95.0% I know that I will achieve the goals I set for myself.94.6% I know more about my rights and options.93.4% I feel more comfortable asking for help.93.3% I feel more confident in making decisions. – a92.7% I feel like I can do more things I want to do.91.3% I know more about community resources.88.5% I get more support from family & friends.78.5%

28 Feedback on Outcomes I learned how much I'm worth and my rights as a person and a woman. I have a better life together with my kids and we live in peace and harmony. Survivor from Illinois It has helped me a lot in the form of knowing that I'm worth something and I'm someone important. And in the group I feel comfortable again to be able to accept friendships and to have trust in myself. Survivor from Washington I feel stronger and do feel more hopeful towards the future. Survivor from program identified by APIIDV

29 Focus Group Populations: 10 Groups, N = 73 Culturally-specific populations: Asian/Pacific Islander African American Hispanic/Latino(a) (2 groups) Portuguese-speaking Brazilian immigrants Other targeted populations: LGBTQ Men Older adults Survivors living in rural areas Survivors in recovery from substance abuse

30 Implications—for DV Programs Survivors report high levels of satisfaction with the services and supports they receive, and with program staff, suggesting that DV programs should continue to offer a broad array of services and continue with staff training efforts. High correlation between services and supports “wanted” and those “received” suggests that programs are meeting the needs of survivors in many areas; but there is room for improvement in meeting economic needs, legal advocacy needs, and supports for children. Outcomes suggest that DV programs are creating positive change the lives of survivors.

31 Implications—Outcome Measures Hope the “catalyst” of mental health recovery (SAMHSA, 2006) Advocacy services found to be protective and enhance well-being in more controlled studies. e.g. -- ◦ Empowerment services protect against PTSD for survivors in shelter with low/moderate violence; beyond benefits of resources (Perez, Johnson & Wright, 2012) ◦ Advocacy in health care settings associated with reduced violence, depression, & reproductive coercion (Coker et al, 2012; Kiely et al, 2010; Miller et al, 2010; Tiwara et al, 2010) ◦ Enhanced follow-up advocacy associated with enhanced well- being (Sullivan & Bybee, 2002)

32 Implications—Training and Practice DV survivors have multiple & complex needs; need comprehensive & collaborative approach. Many survivors want/need to remain in a relationship with the person who has abused them—importance of safety planning that takes this into account, and of services for people who are abusing. Needs related to children are primary among mothers. Culturally appropriate/competent services are vital.

33 Resources RESOURCES on VAWnet.org Meeting Survivors’ Needs Study Resource Page Research Resources Use of Data & Statistics QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS ABOUT THE STUDY? Please contact


Download ppt "Meeting Survivors’ Needs: A Multi-State Study of Survivors’ Experiences with Domestic Violence Programs’ Non-Residential Services and Supports NCADV/NOMAS."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google