Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Alateen Training Module II Alateen Group Sponsorship: The Alateen Meeting This is Module II in a series of four modules developed by the World Service.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Alateen Training Module II Alateen Group Sponsorship: The Alateen Meeting This is Module II in a series of four modules developed by the World Service."— Presentation transcript:

1 Alateen Training Module II Alateen Group Sponsorship: The Alateen Meeting
This is Module II in a series of four modules developed by the World Service Office to assist Area Alateen Coordinators and other trusted servants in offering training to Al-Anon Members Involved in Alateen Service (AMIAS)—those who are serving as Alateen Group Sponsors and those who may offer support in other ways. We hope that you will find this series of modules helpful in training others and to facilitate training sessions. Information for these modules has been collected from many sources, including previous WSO materials and training packages submitted from several Areas in the U.S. and Canada. Areas are encouraged to insert their Area Safety and Behavioral Requirements as well as their certification and group registration processes into this document. You can use it as a live presentation, print out the slides to create a handout, or both. FACILITATOR’S NOTES: [This space is provided so the facilitator can add their own notes to personalize the presentation.] Arizona Area 1

2 The Alateen Group Every Alateen group has Alateen Group Sponsor(s) who have been certified in their Area as Al-Anon Members Involved in Alateen Service (AMIAS). KEY POINTS: In order to hold an Alateen group meeting, Alateen Group Sponsor(s) who have been certified through the Area process as Al-Anon Members Involved in Alateen Service must be in attendance. Both Alateens and Alateen Group Sponsors have been affected by the disease of alcoholism and are in Al‑Anon and Alateen to recover. As an Al-Anon member, an Alateen Group Sponsor has much to offer Alateen members. The Alateens take responsibility for their meetings; the Alateen Group Sponsor’s role is to provide direction and to keep the focus on the Al-Anon/Alateen program. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Groups at Work (P-24) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) From the 2003 Board of Trustees’ Alateen Motion: “The Al-Anon fellowship should take all necessary steps to provide a safe environment for Alateens and the Al-Anons involved with Alateen service.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

3 Alateen Members: Who they are
Young people seeking recovery from the effects of someone else’s drinking Members of Al-Anon Family Groups who study and apply the Al-Anon/ Alateen Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions to their own lives KEY POINTS: Alateens are members of Al-Anon Family Groups. They attend Alateen to seek recovery from the effects of someone else’s drinking. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34): “Alateens are members of the Al-Anon fellowship who have suffered because of the alcoholism of a loved one. They have come to Alateen seeking recovery.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

4 Alateen Members Share their experience, strength, and hope with each other Take responsibility for the group, the meeting, and their own behavior Support the actions of their Alateen Group Sponsor(s) to help keep their meeting safe Serve as personal Sponsors to each other KEY POINTS: Alateen members chair the Alateen meetings, and share experience, strength, and hope with each other. The Alateen Group Sponsor does not facilitate the meetings, but supports and encourages the Alateens to take responsibility for their own meetings. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) From the Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34): “Support the actions of your Alateen Group Sponsors…To the best of their ability, Alateen Group Sponsors must maintain a sense of safety and trust in order for recovery to take place and to protect the Alateen members from physical and emotional harm.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

5 Younger Children and Alateen
Alateen requires the ability to participate in a shared learning experience. Teaching is not compatible with the Al-Anon principle of sharing. Parents can help their children by attending Al-Anon themselves. Lowering the age range is up to the autonomy of the group. KEY POINTS: Alateen groups are usually for young people ages 13 to 18. However, groups have the autonomy to accept members younger than teen years if they have the maturity to participate in an Alateen meeting (usually an hour) as a shared learning experience. It is important that Alateen meetings are not a “teaching” program. Some parents will look for meetings for very young children; experience suggests that the best way for parents to help their children is to go to Al-Anon themselves. Think of it as instructions are given on an airplane: put your own oxygen mask on first before helping others with theirs. All Alateen meetings, regardless of age range, will be called “Alateen.” REFERENCES: How Can I Help My Children (P-9) is an excellent resource for parents. Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) From the 1985 World Service Conference Summary: “…the WSO registers only Alateen groups and leaves the decision on age up to the individual groups and Areas. Such groups are discouraged from using designations such as ‘preteen,’ ‘alatot,’ or ‘alakid,’ for the good of Alateen worldwide; these titles are often used for non-Alateen meetings run by professionals.” From the Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27), pages 89: “As the name implies, Alateen is designed for members in their teens. Family members below teen years may not be ready for the Alateen program. Such children may have to depend on others to choose what they learn. This could lead to the development of a teaching program. ‘Teaching’ is not compatible with the Al‑Anon principle of sharing. There are, however, younger children who can benefit from the Alateen program, which requires the ability to participate in a shared learning experience. “It is within the autonomy of each Alateen group to lower the age limit or divide into groups according to age. Whatever the decision, all such groups will be registered as ‘Alateen’ at the World Service Office. Members in their teen years who are legally adults agree to abide by the same requirements as minor Alateens when they attend Alateen meetings and events.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

6 Younger Children and Alateen Things to consider
Setting safety guidelines for younger children Knowing applicable laws relating to children below teen years Potential problems with sharing from older Alateens being inappropriate for the younger ones Alateens age 18 and older are legally adults All Alateens, even those who are legal adults, must comply with the Area Alateen Requirements when participating as an Alateen All Alateen groups, regardless of age range, are registered as "Alateen”. KEY POINTS: Consider all legal and safety issues. Some states/provinces have mandatory reporting of suspected child abuse; know your laws. Mixing younger children and older teens can be problematic. Some groups divide into two groups by age. Remember that when a teen reaches age 18, they are legally considered an adult. Be sure that such teens’ interactions with younger children is monitored to keep everyone safe. REFERENCES: How Can I Help My Children (P-9) is an excellent resource for parents. Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) From the 1985 World Service Conference Summary: “…the WSO registers only Alateen groups and leaves the decision on age up to the individual groups and Areas. Such groups are discouraged from using designations such as ‘preteen,’ ‘alatot,’ or ‘alakid,’ for the good of Alateen worldwide; these titles are often used for non-Alateen meetings run by professionals.” Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

7 Alateen Group Sponsors
Are certified as Al-Anon Members Involved in Alateen Service (Note that AMIAS must be certified first in the Area in which they live; if serving Alateen in a neighboring Area, they must also be certified in that Area) Support the Alateens in taking responsibility for their own meeting Share recovery Listen, listen, listen Attend Al-Anon meetings regularly KEY POINTS: Alateen Group Sponsors are active members of Al-Anon, who have been certified in their Area as an Al‑Anon Member Involved in Alateen Service. Alateen Group Sponsors: Coach the Alateen members to chair the meetings and to be responsible for the group. Listen: learn when to be quiet and when to share. May find it helpful to ask one or two questions to help Alateens find their own solutions. Treat Alateens with respect and courtesy, set limits, and don’t accept unacceptable behavior. Work with each other as a team to sponsor the group meeting. Work on their Al-Anon recovery; attend Al-Anon meetings regularly. Share recovery with Alateens; Alateen Group Sponsors share their personal problems with their personal Sponsor or Al‑Anon group, not with the Alateens. REFERENCES: From the Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27), page 88: “An Alateen Group Sponsor is an adult member of Al-Anon who attends Al-Anon meetings regularly, is currently certified as an Al-Anon Member Involved in Alateen Service though their Area’s Alateen process, and has made a commitment to be of service to an Alateen meeting on a regular basis.” From the Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34): “AMIAS are to provide direction to assure that emphasis is placed on the Al-Anon/Alateen program of recovery and, to the best of their ability, maintain an atmosphere that will protect the Alateen members from physical and emotional harm.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

8 Who Can Start an Alateen Group?
The idea can come from an Al-Anon group or member, an A.A. member, a counselor, a school administrator, a teacher, an Alateen member, or any other young person To start an Alateen meeting, the first step is to make contact with the District or Area Alateen Coordinator KEY POINTS: Just about anyone can initiate the idea of starting an Alateen Group The initiator must be informed of the Area Requirements and the need for certified Al-Anon Members Involved in Alateen Service Meetings in schools and other facilities will need to meet the requirements set by the facility as well as the Area Requirements REFERENCES: From the Al-Anon/Alateen Groups at Work (P-24), page 31: “Alateen groups are usually started at the suggestion of an Al-Anon or A.A. member, a professional, school personnel, or the teenagers themselves. Alateen groups require Alateen Group Sponsors who are currently certified through their Area’s Alateen process as Al-Anon Members Involved in Alateen Service (AMIAS), and meet all Area Requirements for service to Alateen.” Starting an Alateen Group (G-19) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

9 Starting an Alateen Group
Contact Area Alateen Coordinator or District Alateen Liaison/Coordinator Obtain support from one or more Al-Anon groups if possible Obtain certified Group Sponsors and AMIAS for backups Find a location for a weekly group meeting Discuss age range Register with WSO through Area Process KEY POINTS: This is an overview of the basic steps in starting an Alateen group Get all the information you can from the Area Alateen Coordinator, District contact, or DR Al-Anon support is very important Certified Group Sponsors are required REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Groups at Work (P-24), page 32: “Alateen Group Registration/Change forms and Al‑Anon Member Involved in Alateen Service (AMIAS) forms are distributed by the Area and submitted to the WSO through the Area’s Alateen process.” Starting an Alateen Group (G-19) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

10 The Alateen Group Meeting
All weekly Alateen meetings are “closed” meetings, regularly attended only by the Alateens and the affiliated Alateen Group Sponsors and certified backups.* Alateen groups may hold an occasional “open” meeting to celebrate the group’s anniversary or for outreach purposes. The District Representative (or other Area-designated trusted servants) as part of their service responsibility may occasionally attend Alateen groups. * Any potential Group Sponsors need to be certified before attending an Alateen meeting. KEY POINTS: All Alateen Group Sponsors and backup Sponsors must be currently certified according to their Area Alateen Process. Alateen meetings are based on member-to-member sharing. As the Alateens get to know the Alateen Group Sponsors in the meeting, they will feel safer and more comfortable sharing. It is a good idea to plan an occasional (annual, biannual, quarterly) open meeting, to invite the local Al-Anon groups and even community members to attend. This can be a time to introduce more Al-Anon members to Alateen service, and to inform professionals in the area about Alateen. DRs or other trusted servants may attend as a resource to the group, according to the Area Process. Many DRs visit all groups in the district to introduce themselves. The Area Alateen Coordinator or DR might attend an Alateen group to: Help the group take an inventory Help resolve problems Share Alateen information or respond to group questions REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27, page 89): “Alateen meetings are closed meetings; ordinarily only Alateen members, prospective members, and the Area-certified Alateen Group Sponsors affiliated with the group attend. However, designated Area trusted servants may occasionally attend the meeting as a resource to the group per the Area’s Alateen Safety and Behavioral Requirements.” From the guideline, Starting an Alateen Group (G-19): “District or Area trusted servants may occasionally attend the meeting as a resource to the group per the Area’s Alateen requirements.” Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

11 Al-Anon Support The support of one or more established Al-Anon meetings can help to ensure success. The Al-Anon group members can: Encourage Al-Anon members to become certified to provide a pool of backup Alateen Group Sponsors. Bring their own children/grandchildren to the Alateen meeting. Mention the Alateen meeting in their group announcements. Help the Alateen group get started financially; it is important that they become self-supporting as soon as possible. Welcome Alateens, particularly those transitioning, to the Al-Anon meeting. KEY POINTS: Encourage Al-Anon groups to take responsibility for service to Alateen groups, with multiple members becoming certified, so that there will always be Alateen Group Sponsors and backup Sponsors available. An Al-Anon group may help an Alateen group get started financially or provide start-up literature. Alateens are members of Al-Anon Family Groups, and thus welcome at all Al-Anon meetings. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) From the guideline Starting an Alateen Group (G-19): “Experience has shown that Alateen groups which meet at the same time and place as an Al-Anon or A.A. group are more successful, safer, and the Alateens have fewer transportation problems.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

12 Starting an Alateen Group Finding a location
Alateen meetings are best served by meeting at the same time as an established Al-Anon meeting. A teen clubhouse, mall community room, or juvenile facility may provide a familiar and comfortable place for an Alateen meeting. Sometimes a professional will offer meeting space; if they are in a position to refer teens to the meeting, this can be a win-win location. Consider transportation and safety issues. KEY POINTS: Having the meeting at the same time and place as an Al-Anon group can be helpful: Parent/guardian can provide transportation and have a meeting to attend themselves. Substitute Group Sponsors can be available (must be certified AMIAS). Supports the fact that we are all part of Al-Anon FAMILY Groups. Other locations may facilitate young people attending, such as in a school, teen facility, etc. Think about outreach activities to those in a position to refer young people to the meeting. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Groups at Work (P-24), pages 31-36 Starting an Alateen Group (G-19): “Experience has shown that Alateen groups which meet at the same time and place as an Al‑Anon or A.A. group are more successful, safer, and the Alateens have fewer transportation problems. Al‑Anon groups can also support the Alateen group by encouraging members to become certified AMIAS in order to serve as regular or backup Alateen Group Sponsors.” Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

13 AZ Area Process for Alateen Group Registration
WSO will only register groups through the Area process. The Alateen Group Sponsors, CMA, and group contacts must be Area-certified AMIAS. All Alateen forms are distributed by the area AAPP or Alateen Coordinator. The GR-3 form is required when registering a new Alateen group and when making changes to an existing Alateen group. Completed GR-3 forms should be sent to the AAPP. Wait to hear that your group has been registered before holding your first Alateen meeting. All Alateen groups, regardless of age range, are registered as "Alateen”. KEY POINTS: REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

14 Annual Process for Keeping Existing Alateen Meetings Active
The Alateen Group Sponsors for a group must submit an updated GR-3 form to the AAPP every year by June 1. The WSO sends GR-3 forms to all registered Alateen groups annually to facilitate the process. The GR-3 form must list two AMIAS who have been successfully certified for the current year. The AAPP maintains the list of those AMIAS who have been successfully certified and re-certified. Failure to submit the form on time or to submit a form that has less than two certified AMIAS as Alateen Group Sponsors will result in the group being marked Inactive. Inactive groups cannot meet using the Alateen name.

15 Here is an example of the GR-3 form
Here is an example of the GR-3 form. There are also instructions available to use as a guideline, when filling out the form. To the right are some of those instructions. The WSO ID# is an 8 digit number assigned by the WSO at the time of registration. If this form is being submitted to change an already registered group please provide ID#. District number is used to sort the groups for Area printouts. Area name (abbreviation) is also used to sort information for group printouts. Mail Language is the language in which the group receives mail. The mailing language can be different from the meeting language (e.g. language spoken at the meeting is Spanish, but the group would like to receive mail from WSO in English). WSO mail can be sent in English, Spanish, or French. Language Spoken is the language spoken at the meeting. Age Range is the age limits of the members attending the meetings. The Alateen age range is generally 13-18; however, it is within the autonomy of each group to include children younger than 13. As young people reach age 18, they are legally adults and should be encouraged to transition to Al-Anon while still attending Alateen meetings. All Alateen groups, regardless of age range, are registered as "Alateen”.

16 The Importance of choosing a Group Name
It is included in local and on-line meeting directories. May be a potential member's first impression of Al-Anon/Alateen. Should be inviting to all and reflect Alateen principles. A name that includes the town or section of the town, the meeting day, a slogan, or another phrase from our program is inviting to all and conforms to Al-Anon/Alateen principles. Should not imply affiliation with any other Twelve Step group, self-help group, commercial venture, agency, religious group, rehabilitation facility, or other outside enterprise even if the name is associated with its location (such as a church or hospital). Nicknames or attempts at humorous names may turn away potential members. The WSO reviews new group names for adherence to Al-Anon/Alateen principles and may ask a group to choose another name if it is not in keeping with Alateen principles.

17 Role of Alateen Group Sponsors in the Alateen Meeting
Provide direction to assure that emphasis is placed on the Al-Anon program of recovery. To the best of their ability, maintain an atmosphere that will protect the Alateen members from physical and emotional harm. Maintain appropriate adult behavior. Encourage Alateens to keep order and take responsibility for themselves and the meeting. Work with others for the good of Alateen. Maintain their own Al-Anon recovery. KEY POINTS: Adult Alateen Group Sponsors must be present in order to hold an Alateen group meeting. The Alateen Group Sponsors are certified by their Area, and it is highly recommended (required in some Areas) that there be at least two Sponsors present at all Alateen meetings. Alateen members may need help in forming a group. However, they are capable of conducting their own meetings and handling group responsibilities. Alateen Group Sponsors encourage them to do so. The Alateen Group Sponsors are there to provide guidance and support, but the Alateens themselves chair the meetings and do most of the sharing. As in Al-Anon, it is not our place to give advice when Alateens share their problems. We also remember we are hearing only one side of the story. Alateen Group Sponsors do not operate as trained professionals. Al-Anon/Alateen does not use professional techniques. Our only common ground is that we are persons who have been affected by the disease of alcoholism. We recover by sharing our experience, strength, and hope. We cannot give away what we do not have. We continue to go to Al-Anon meetings for our own recovery. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27, page 88): “Alateen Group Sponsors encourage the Alateens to take responsibility for their own meetings and to share their experience, strength, and hope with each other.” Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34): “AMIAS are to provide direction to assure that emphasis is placed on the Al-Anon/Alateen program of recovery and, to the best of their ability, maintain an atmosphere that will protect the Alateen members from physical and emotional harm.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

18 Role of Alateen Group Sponsors At events/service meetings in the district/Area
Take responsibility for the Alateens in their care. Work with Area/district events to be sure there is a plan in place for Alateen safety in compliance with Area Requirements. Become familiar with Area Requirements and all WSO and Area Alateen Guidelines. Communicate with district and Area Alateen Coordinators. KEY POINTS: Make safety a primary concern. Support local events; make sure that events including Alateen have a plan in place for Alateen Safety, and are in compliance with Area Alateen Requirements. Remember to reach out to other Sponsors, your District Representative (DR), and Area Alateen Coordinator for support. Alateens sponsor each other peer-to-peer. Alateen Group Sponsors support the group as a whole; they do not serve as personal Sponsors to individual Alateens. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34): “Have guidelines for acceptable behavior. Before attending a function or event, the Alateen Group Sponsor reads and discusses the guidelines thoroughly with the Alateen group.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

19 The Alateen Meeting Safety and Behavior
Alateen Group Sponsors set safety parameters for the meeting. Safety matters are not subject to group vote or approval. Alateen Group Sponsors encourage the group to set their own behavioral guidelines and what the consequences of violations will be. Participation in setting the rules can increase support of them. Resources: Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) Area Requirements (including state/ provincial laws regarding minors) Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) KEY POINTS: The Alateen Group Sponsors can set some safety guidelines for the group, such as refraining from rocking their chairs or hanging out of an open window. No matter the age, the Group Sponsors have the ultimate responsibility for physical and emotional safety in the Alateen meeting. Remember Alateens are children, and use common sense in dealing with them. Facility rules and state/provincial or local laws that apply to minors must be followed; e.g., smoking. The Alateen Group Sponsor can introduce the idea of setting Behavioral Guidelines for the meeting. If the group members participate in setting up the rules, they will be more likely to police themselves, and problems can be avoided. REFERENCES: Your Area Alateen Safety and Behavioral Requirements Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34): “Helping the Alateens identify inappropriate behaviors themselves through a group inventory provides them with an opportunity to design group behavior guidelines.” Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34): “It is suggested that Alateen groups create behavior guidelines so that everyone knows what is expected before, during, and after the meeting. Then, if you or anyone else in your group is uncomfortable with the actions of another Alateen member, a discussion regarding the group’s behavior guidelines is appropriate. If the offensive conduct persists, that member can be asked not to return to the meeting. Before taking such action, start with an informed group conscience, referring back to your group’s behavior guidelines and the application of the Twelve Traditions.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

20 The Alateen Meeting Procedures
Alateen members chair the meetings and assume responsibility for being Group Representative (GR), Secretary, and Treasurer.* Alateen Group Sponsors may assist or coach members in leading the meeting when the group is new. Alateen Group Sponsors help to keep the meeting on track by gently guiding the discussion to stay on Al-Anon/Alateen principles. *an Alateen Group Sponsor should hold the group’s funds. KEY POINTS: When a group is new, the members will need assistance from the Alateen Group Sponsors to become comfortable chairing meetings and presenting topics for discussion. Once a group is established they can be encouraged to elect group officers, including a Group Representative, and to attend district and Area meetings. REFERENCES: Al-Anon & Alateen Groups at Work (P-24) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34): “Alateen Group Sponsors share experience in living with the disease of alcoholism, strength gained from working the Twelve Steps, knowledge of the Twelve Traditions, and hope for the future. An Alateen Group Sponsor is not a counselor, nor the peer of an Alateen member.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

21 The Alateen Meeting Topic/Format Ideas
Where to find meeting ideas: Al-Anon/Alateen Groups at Work (P-24) Basic meeting format Meeting ideas Conference Approved Literature (CAL) Alateen Talk, The Forum Steps, Traditions, Slogans Meeting formats include: discussion, speakers, question and answer, writing Periodic meetings on Sponsorship can help the Alateens to sponsor each other peer-to-peer KEY POINTS: Using the Groups at Work (P-24) booklet to follow the format can be helpful to the Alateen members. (Groups at Work is also contained in the Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual [P-24/27]) Using Conference Approved Literature, Alateen Talk, or The Forum can help to give the Alateens the topics and start the sharing. Alateen stories and articles about recovery are always needed for WSO publications, and writing can be a good use of meeting time. REFERENCES: Al-Anon & Alateen Groups at Work (P-24) Alateen: Hope for Children of Alcoholics (B-3, page 95): “It is a good idea to plan different kinds of meetings. This way all the members can find something that appeals to them…Most groups find it’s a good idea to discuss a Step and Tradition each month.” Courage to Be Me (B-23) – workshop questions follow each chapter FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

22 The Alateen Meeting Taking Care of Business
Group trusted servants Group contacts and Current Mailing Address (CMA) must be certified adults Alateens fill other group positions, including GR Learn when district and Area meetings are held Keeping group information updated Send updates to the Area Alateen Process Person (AAPP), who will relay changes to the WSO Group Records Department Know your Area process for updating your local meeting directory Transportation When Al-Anon members provide transportation as a service to Alateen, they need to be certified according to their Area Alateen process KEY POINTS: Encourage Alateens to take a service role Be sure you understand your Area Alateen Requirements and process for implementing them. REFERENCES: Al-Anon & Alateen Groups at Work (P-24) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

23 Parents and the Alateen Group Sponsor
What is said in an Alateen meeting is confidential. Just as in Al-Anon meetings, “Whom you see here, what you hear here, when you leave here, let it stay here” applies. Group Sponsors keep Alateens’ confidences and do not interfere in parent/child relationships or challenge parental authority. Alateens and Al-Anon members can share with parents how Al-Anon can help them, and encourage parents to try Al-Anon meetings themselves. KEY POINTS: It is a good idea to periodically have a discussion in the group about anonymity and confidentiality. This can be a good reminder for both the Alateens and the Alateen Group Sponsors to let what is said in the meeting, stay in the meeting. Alateen Group Sponsors will keep Alateen confidences. If parents ask them questions, the Group Sponsor can refer them directly to their child. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) Starting an Alateen Group (G-19): “Parents who are currently certified through their Area Alateen process may serve as Alateen Group Sponsors; however, whenever possible, it is preferred that the relatives of any of the Alateen members attending the group not sponsor the group.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

24 What Parents Need to Know about Alateen
Who is with their children. What safety measures are in place. When parental permission forms are required. Information about Alateen events. KEY POINTS: Parents need to know that Alateen is a safe place for their child and that the adults with them are trustworthy, recovering Al-Anon members. Be sure to include parents in an annual open meeting. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34): “Make sure a custodial parent/legal guardian signs a permission form when you are transporting his/her child to a meeting or other function. Have the responsible party sign the permission form in your presence. This is a legal requirement in most states/provinces.” FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

25 Permission and Medical Forms
Permission and Medical forms are found in the Guideline G34. You can also request the forms from the AAPP or Area Alateen Coordinator.

26 Helping the Alateen Group to Grow
Local Public Outreach Information to local schools, churches, counseling centers Participate in district and Al-Anon Information Service meetings and events Contact your Area or District Alateen Coordinator for information regarding Area Alateen Requirements and Public Outreach KEY POINTS: There are many simple public outreach projects that can raise awareness of Alateen. Make sure your meeting facility understands what Alateen is and has the information they need to make referrals. REFERENCES: Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27, page 89): “An Alateen group may hold an occasional (annual, biannual or quarterly) public outreach open meeting for the purpose of introducing Alateen to Al-Anon members, A.A., professionals, teachers, and other members of the community.” Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

27 Starting an Alateen Group Meetings in Schools
Just as with other Alateen groups, meetings in schools must be in compliance with the Area Alateen Safety and Behavioral Requirements. Meetings with school officials may require preparation to educate the staff on what Alateen is and is not. Working with school regulations may require diplomacy and negotiation. Some school districts may require that school personnel sit in on the meetings.* See guideline Alateen Meetings In Schools (G-5) for tips and suggestions. KEY POINTS: * Important note: It may or may not be possible to come to an agreement that meets both the school’s policies and Al-Anon Family Groups requirements for forming an Alateen group. Be prepared to offer alternatives, such as providing literature and/or bringing a public outreach presentation to the school. REFERENCES: Alateen Meetings in Schools (G-5) Al-Anon & Alateen Groups at Work (P-24) Starting an Alateen Group (G-19): “Limited Access Meetings meet at locations where general membership may not be able to attend (such as a school or group home). Alateen Group Sponsors in limited access groups must also be certified through their Area Alateen process in addition to complying with any facility requirements. More information on school meetings is available in Alateen Meetings in Schools (G-5) and Information for the Educator: Alateen Meetings in Schools leaflet (S-64).” Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

28 Al-Anon/Alateen Literature and other Materials
Conference Approved Literature Recovery books, pamphlets, booklets Guidelines Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) Alateen Talk (quarterly)* The Forum (monthly)** Two WSO Web sites: [insert Area/local Web site] * English only. Excerpts are translated to French and Spanish and posted on ** English only. Spanish- and French-speaking Al-Anon and Alateen groups receive En Accion and Le Lien respectively five times a year. KEY POINTS: There is a wealth of Alateen literature available for meeting tools. It is recommended to have a copy of each piece available: Alateen—Hope for Children of Alcoholics (B-3) Alateen—a day at a time (B-10) Courage to Be Me—Living with Alcoholism (B-23) Living Today in Alateen (B-26) Alateen’s 4th Step Inventory (P-64) Alateen Do’s and Don’ts (M-9) Just for Today (Alateen) (M-11) Has Your Life been Affected by Someone Else’s Drinking? Alateen is for You! (S-20) Twelve Steps and Twelve Traditions for Alateen (P-18) Youth and the Alcoholic Parent (P-21) Daily Checklist for Myself (S-6) Alateen Talks Back booklet series (P-68, 69, 70, 73) REFERENCES: Al-Anon Family Groups Conference Approved Literature Catalog (S-15) Al-Anon/Alateen Service Manual (P-24/27) Alateen Safety Guidelines (G-34) Alateen Conferences (G-16) Starting an Alateen Group (G-19) FACILITATOR’S NOTES:

29 More Resources for Help
National 24 hour Domestic Violence Hotline National Sexual Assault Hotline HOPE (4673) National Suicide Prevention Hotline TALK (8255) Arizona Child Abuse Hotline 888-SOS-CHILD ( ) https://www.azdes.gov Peer Counseling Suicide Hotline Statewide:

30 In Closing Welcome to the world of service to Alateen
Contact for questions: AZ Area Alateen Coordinator: AZ Area Alateen Process Person: KEY POINTS: This concludes Alateen Training Module II – The Alateen Meeting. Other modules are: I. Overview of Alateen Service III. Alateen Events IV. Alateen Challenges REFERENCES: Area contact list, if available FACILITATOR’S NOTES: The next training will be: [insert info]


Download ppt "Alateen Training Module II Alateen Group Sponsorship: The Alateen Meeting This is Module II in a series of four modules developed by the World Service."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google