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Area 69- District Kit Presentation. BRIDGING THE GAP a subcommittee of the Area 69 Utah Treatment and Corrections Standing Committees The primary purpose.

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Presentation on theme: "Area 69- District Kit Presentation. BRIDGING THE GAP a subcommittee of the Area 69 Utah Treatment and Corrections Standing Committees The primary purpose."— Presentation transcript:

1 Area 69- District Kit Presentation

2 BRIDGING THE GAP a subcommittee of the Area 69 Utah Treatment and Corrections Standing Committees The primary purpose of the Bridging The Gap program in Area 69 Utah is to carry the message of Alcoholics Anonymous to the alcoholic who is confined and preparing for release. The activities of this program are based on, and governed by, the Twelve Steps and the Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous.

3 Cooperation with the Professional Community A.A. ® Guidelines from G.S.O., Box 459, Grand Central Station, New York, NY A.A. Guidelines are compiled from the shared experience of A.A. members in various service areas. They also reflect guidance given through the Twelve Traditions and the General Service Conference (U.S. and Canada). In keeping with our Tradition of autonomy, except in matters affecting other groups or A.A. as a whole, most decisions are made by the group conscience of the members involved. The purpose of these Guidelines is to assist in reaching an informed group conscience. HOW A.A. CARRIES THE MESSAGE TO ALCOHOLICS IN CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES from San Francisco brought the first A.A. meet­ing into San Quentin Prison at the request of Warden Clinton T. Duffy. This example led to A.A.'s cooperation with court systems, including direct communications with judges and parole and proba­tion officials. The sole purpose of this Twelfth Step work, then and now, was to carry A.A.'s message to the still-suffering alcoholic. To fulfill that purpose, A.A.s have learned how to share A.A. informa­tion within court systems. Probation and parole officers, as well as judges, often require peo­ple involved in alcohol-related offenses to attend A.A. meetings. Some A.A. members find it difficult to accept this "outside" policy in light of our Third Tradition, 'The only requirement for A.A. member-ship is a desire to stop drinking.' Perhaps its helpful to remember that our Traditions apply to us, and aren't affected by the regula­tions established by outside institutions—we cooperate without affil­iating. By adhering to all Twelve Traditions, many groups welcome each newcomer regardless of how they got to the meeting. In recent years, a larger number of "safe driving" programs have been set up for drivers in trouble with the law because of some episode related to drinking. These programs have many different names—such as Alcohol Safety Action Project (A.S.A.P.), Driving While Intoxicated (D.W.I.), Driving Under the Influence (D.U.I.), and the like. Many A.A. committees that cooperate with these programs offer attenders a chance to learn about A.A., and many are now members of A.A. as a result. From Page 89 of the Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous: "Practical experience shows that nothing will so much insure immunity from ddnking as intensive work with other In 1942, members from San Francisco brought the first A.A. meet­ing into San Quentin Prison at the request of Warden Clinton T. Duffy. This example led to A.A.'s cooperation with court systems, including direct communications with judges and parole and proba­tion officials. The sole purpose of this Twelfth Step work, then and now, was to carry A.A.'s message to the still-suffering alcoholic. To fulfill that purpose, A.A.s have learned how to share A.A. informa­tion within court systems. Probation and parole officers, as well as judges, often require peo­ple involved in alcohol-related offenses to attend A.A. meetings. Some A.A. members find it difficult to accept this "outside" policy in light of our Third Tradition, 'The only requirement for A.A. member-ship is a desire to stop drinking.' Perhaps its helpful to remember that our Traditions apply to us, and aren't affected by the regula­tions established by outside institutions—we cooperate without affil­iating. By adhering to all Twelve Traditions, many groups welcome each newcomer regardless of how they got to the meeting. In recent years, a larger number of "safe driving" programs have been set up for drivers in trouble with the law because of some episode related to drinking. These programs have many different names—such as Alcohol Safety Action Project (A.S.A.P.), Driving While Intoxicated (D.W.I.), Driving Under the Influence (D.U.I.), and the like. Many A.A. committees that cooperate with these programs offer attenders a chance to learn about A.A., and many are now members of A.A. as a result. From Page 89 of the Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous: "Practical experience shows that nothing will so much insure immunity from ddnking as intensive work with other Correctional Facilities Committees A.A. ® Guidelines from G.S.O., Box 459, Grand Central Station, New York, NY A.A. Guidelines are compiled from the shared experience of A.A. members in various service areas. They also reflect guidance given through the Twelve Traditions and the General Service Conference (U.S. and Canada). In keeping with our Tradition of autonomy, except in matters affecting other groups or A.A. as a whole, most decisions are made by the group conscience of the members involved. The purpose of these Guidelines is to assist in reaching an informed group conscience. HOW A.A. CARRIES THE MESSAGE TO ALCOHOLICS IN CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES from San Francisco brought the first A.A. meet­ing into San Quentin Prison at the request of Warden Clinton T. Duffy. This example led to A.A.'s cooperation with court systems, including direct communications with judges and parole and proba­tion officials. The sole purpose of this Twelfth Step work, then and now, was to carry A.A.'s message to the still-suffering alcoholic. To fulfill that purpose, A.A.s have learned how to share A.A. informa­tion within court systems. Probation and parole officers, as well as judges, often require peo­ple involved in alcohol-related offenses to attend A.A. meetings. Some A.A. members find it difficult to accept this "outside" policy in light of our Third Tradition, 'The only requirement for A.A. member-ship is a desire to stop drinking.' Perhaps its helpful to remember that our Traditions apply to us, and aren't affected by the regula­tions established by outside institutions—we cooperate without affil­iating. By adhering to all Twelve Traditions, many groups welcome each newcomer regardless of how they got to the meeting. In recent years, a larger number of "safe driving" programs have been set up for drivers in trouble with the law because of some episode related to drinking. These programs have many different names—such as Alcohol Safety Action Project (A.S.A.P.), Driving While Intoxicated (D.W.I.), Driving Under the Influence (D.U.I.), and the like. Many A.A. committees that cooperate with these programs offer attenders a chance to learn about A.A., and many are now members of A.A. as a result. From Page 89 of the Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous: "Practical experience shows that nothing will so much insure immunity from ddnking as intensive work with other In 1942, members from San Francisco brought the first A.A. meet­ing into San Quentin Prison at the request of Warden Clinton T. Duffy. This example led to A.A.'s cooperation with court systems, including direct communications with judges and parole and proba­tion officials. The sole purpose of this Twelfth Step work, then and now, was to carry A.A.'s message to the still-suffering alcoholic. To fulfill that purpose, A.A.s have learned how to share A.A. informa­tion within court systems. Probation and parole officers, as well as judges, often require peo­ple involved in alcohol-related offenses to attend A.A. meetings. Some A.A. members find it difficult to accept this "outside" policy in light of our Third Tradition, 'The only requirement for A.A. member-ship is a desire to stop drinking.' Perhaps its helpful to remember that our Traditions apply to us, and aren't affected by the regula­tions established by outside institutions—we cooperate without affil­iating. By adhering to all Twelve Traditions, many groups welcome each newcomer regardless of how they got to the meeting. In recent years, a larger number of "safe driving" programs have been set up for drivers in trouble with the law because of some episode related to drinking. These programs have many different names—such as Alcohol Safety Action Project (A.S.A.P.), Driving While Intoxicated (D.W.I.), Driving Under the Influence (D.U.I.), and the like. Many A.A. committees that cooperate with these programs offer attenders a chance to learn about A.A., and many are now members of A.A. as a result. From Page 89 of the Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous: "Practical experience shows that nothing will so much insure immunity from ddnking as intensive work with other Treatment Facilities Committees A.A. ® Guidelines from G.S.O., Box 459, Grand Central Station, New York, NY A.A. Guidelines are compiled from the shared experience of A.A. members in various service areas. They also reflect guidance given through the Twelve Traditions and the General Service Conference (U.S. and Canada). In keeping with our Tradition of autonomy, except in matters affecting other groups or A.A. as a whole, most decisions are made by the group conscience of the members involved. The purpose of these Guidelines is to assist in reaching an informed group conscience. HOW A.A.s CARRY THE MESSAGE TO ALCOHOLICS IN TREATMENT FACILITIES from San Francisco brought the first A.A. meet­ing into San Quentin Prison at the request of Warden Clinton T. Duffy. This example led to A.A.'s cooperation with court systems, including direct communications with judges and parole and proba­tion officials. The sole purpose of this Twelfth Step work, then and now, was to carry A.A.'s message to the still-suffering alcoholic. To fulfill that purpose, A.A.s have learned how to share A.A. informa­tion within court systems. Probation and parole officers, as well as judges, often require peo­ple involved in alcohol-related offenses to attend A.A. meetings. Some A.A. members find it difficult to accept this "outside" policy in light of our Third Tradition, 'The only requirement for A.A. member-ship is a desire to stop drinking.' Perhaps its helpful to remember that our Traditions apply to us, and aren't affected by the regula­tions established by outside institutions—we cooperate without affil­iating. By adhering to all Twelve Traditions, many groups welcome each newcomer regardless of how they got to the meeting. In recent years, a larger number of "safe driving" programs have been set up for drivers in trouble with the law because of some episode related to drinking. These programs have many different names—such as Alcohol Safety Action Project (A.S.A.P.), Driving While Intoxicated (D.W.I.), Driving Under the Influence (D.U.I.), and the like. Many A.A. committees that cooperate with these programs offer attenders a chance to learn about A.A., and many are now members of A.A. as a result. From Page 89 of the Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous: "Practical experience shows that nothing will so much insure immunity from ddnking as intensive work with other In 1942, members from San Francisco brought the first A.A. meet­ing into San Quentin Prison at the request of Warden Clinton T. Duffy. This example led to A.A.'s cooperation with court systems, including direct communications with judges and parole and proba­tion officials. The sole purpose of this Twelfth Step work, then and now, was to carry A.A.'s message to the still-suffering alcoholic. To fulfill that purpose, A.A.s have learned how to share A.A. informa­tion within court systems. Probation and parole officers, as well as judges, often require peo­ple involved in alcohol-related offenses to attend A.A. meetings. Some A.A. members find it difficult to accept this "outside" policy in light of our Third Tradition, 'The only requirement for A.A. member-ship is a desire to stop drinking.' Perhaps its helpful to remember that our Traditions apply to us, and aren't affected by the regula­tions established by outside institutions—we cooperate without affil­iating. By adhering to all Twelve Traditions, many groups welcome each newcomer regardless of how they got to the meeting. In recent years, a larger number of "safe driving" programs have been set up for drivers in trouble with the law because of some episode related to drinking. These programs have many different names—such as Alcohol Safety Action Project (A.S.A.P.), Driving While Intoxicated (D.W.I.), Driving Under the Influence (D.U.I.), and the like. Many A.A. committees that cooperate with these programs offer attenders a chance to learn about A.A., and many are now members of A.A. as a result. From Page 89 of the Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous: "Practical experience shows that nothing will so much insure immunity from ddnking as intensive work with other Cooperating with Court, D.W.I. and Similar Programs A.A. ® Guidelines from G.S.O., Box 459, Grand Central Station, New York, NY A.A. Guidelines are compiled from the shared experience of A.A. members in various service areas. They also reflect guidance given through the Twelve Traditions and the General Service Conference (U.S. and Canada). In keeping with our Tradition of autonomy, except in matters affecting other groups or A.A. as a whole, most decisions are made by the group conscience of the members involved. The purpose of these Guidelines is to assist in reaching an informed group conscience. WHEN AND WHY A.A. BEGAN COOPERATING WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES In 1942, members from San Francisco brought the first A.A. meet­ing into San Quentin Prison at the request of Warden Clinton T. Duffy. This example led to A.A.'s cooperation with court systems, including direct communications with judges and parole and proba­tion officials. The sole purpose of this Twelfth Step work, then and now, was to carry A.A.'s message to the still-suffering alcoholic. To fulfill that purpose, A.A.s have learned how to share A.A. informa­tion within court systems. Probation and parole officers, as well as judges, often require peo­ple involved in alcohol-related offenses to attend A.A. meetings. Some A.A. members find it difficult to accept this "outside" policy in light of our Third Tradition, 'The only requirement for A.A. member-ship is a desire to stop drinking.' Perhaps its helpful to remember that our Traditions apply to us, and aren't affected by the regula­tions established by outside institutions—we cooperate without affil­iating. By adhering to all Twelve Traditions, many groups welcome each newcomer regardless of how they got to the meeting. In recent years, a larger number of "safe driving" programs have been set up for drivers in trouble with the law because of some episode related to drinking. These programs have many different names—such as Alcohol Safety Action Project (A.S.A.P.), Driving While Intoxicated (D.W.I.), Driving Under the Influence (D.U.I.), and the like. Many A.A. committees that cooperate with these programs offer attenders a chance to learn about A.A., and many are now members of A.A. as a result. From Page 89 of the Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous: "Practical experience shows that nothing will so much insure immunity from ddnking as intensive work with other WHEN AND WHY A.A. BEGAN COOPERATING WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES In 1942, members from San Francisco brought the first A.A. meet­ing into San Quentin Prison at the request of Warden Clinton T. Duffy. This example led to A.A.'s cooperation with court systems, including direct communications with judges and parole and proba­tion officials. The sole purpose of this Twelfth Step work, then and now, was to carry A.A.'s message to the still-suffering alcoholic. To fulfill that purpose, A.A.s have learned how to share A.A. informa­tion within court systems. Probation and parole officers, as well as judges, often require peo­ple involved in alcohol-related offenses to attend A.A. meetings. Some A.A. members find it difficult to accept this "outside" policy in light of our Third Tradition, 'The only requirement for A.A. member-ship is a desire to stop drinking.' Perhaps its helpful to remember that our Traditions apply to us, and aren't affected by the regula­tions established by outside institutions—we cooperate without affil­iating. By adhering to all Twelve Traditions, many groups welcome each newcomer regardless of how they got to the meeting. In recent years, a larger number of "safe driving" programs have been set up for drivers in trouble with the law because of some episode related to drinking. These programs have many different names—such as Alcohol Safety Action Project (A.S.A.P.), Driving While Intoxicated (D.W.I.), Driving Under the Influence (D.U.I.), and the like. Many A.A. committees that cooperate with these programs offer attenders a chance to learn about A.A., and many are now members of A.A. as a result. From Page 89 of the Big Book, Alcoholics Anonymous: "Practical experience shows that nothing will so much insure immunity from ddnking as intensive work with other

4 This is A.A. General Service Conference-approved literature Bridging the Gap Between Treatment and A.A. Through Temporary Contact Programs This is A.A. General Service Conference-approved literature Speaking at non-AA meetings A file of information for speakers, drawn from A.A. experience and compiled by the Public Information Committee at the General Service Office This is A.A. General Service Conference-approved literature A brief guide to Alcoholics Anonymous Problems other than Alcohol This is A.A. General Service Conference-approved literature AA as a Resource for the Health Care Professional This is A.A. General Service Conference-approved literature Alcoholics Anonymous in your Community How the Fellowship of A.A. works in your community to help alcoholics If You are a Professional… This is A.A. General Service Conference-approved literature Alcoholics Anonymous wants to work with you AA in Treatment Facilities This is A.A. General Service Conference-approved literature AA in Correctional Facilities What is A.A.? Alcoholics Anonymous is a voluntary, worldwide fellowship of men and women from all walks of life who meet together to attain and maintain sobriety. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership. Current Membership It is estimated that there are about 96,000 groups and more than 2,000,000 members in 134 countries. Relations With Outside Agencies The Fellowship has adopted a policy of "cooperation but not affiliation" with other organizations concerned with the problem of alcoholism. We have no opinion on issues outside A.A. and neither endorse nor oppose any causes. How A.A. Is Supported Over the years, Alcoholics Anonymous has affirmed and strengthened a tradition of being fully self-supporting and of neither seeking nor accepting contributions from nonmembers. Within the Fellowship, the amount that may be contributed by any individual member is limited to $1,000 a year. How A.A. Members Maintain Sobriety A.A. is a program of total abstinence. Members simply stay away from one drink, one day at a time. Sobriety is maintained through sharing experience, strength, and hope at group meetings and through the suggested Twelve Steps for recovery from alcoholism. Why Alcoholics Anonymous Is `Anonymous‘ Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of A.A. It disciplines the Fellowship to govern itself by principles rather than personalities. We are a society of peers. We strive to make known our program of recovery, not individuals who participate in the program. Anonymity in the public media is assurance to all A.A.s, especially to newcomers, that their A.A. membership will not be disclosed. F-1 600M 5/92 (BN) (OVER) A.A. at a glance

5 Area 69 Utah items Pamphlet “So You’ve Been Told To Go To AA And You Hate The Idea” Area 69 Utah BTG Do’s and Don’t’s Suggestions Area 69 Bridging The Gap Prerelease Contact Program: For A.A. Inmates Area 69 Bridging The Gap Prerelease Contact Program: For A.A. Members So You’ve Been Told to Go to A.A…. And You Hate the Idea… You’re not alone And You’re not the first

6 Area 69 Utah Do’s and Don’t’s Suggestions for BTG Volunteers DO take the new member to a meeting within the first Twenty-four hours of release. take an other member of the fellowship on this Twelfth Step Call. explain to the new member that this is a temporary commitment, usually limited to six visits. This is important so the BTG volunteers can help the next new member. make sure that the new members receive Meeting Schedules, Telephone Numbers, Literature, and their own Big Book. encourage them to attend meetings as often as possible, emphasize the importance of the home group. explain the important of sponsorship, share how you got your sponsor. refrain from using profanity, unrelated and off-color jokes, prolonged monologues of drunk stories and other types of self indulgence. respect full anonymity of new members at all times. keep in touch with your sponsor and your High Power. DO NOT forget the importance of the new members first meeting within Twenty-four hours of release. become responsible for the members attitude or actions in or out of the meetings. become a personal taxi service. let the new member dictate where to go for the meetings. allow any emotional or romantic relationship to develop. act in any reporting or communicating capacity regarding the new member and the justice system or treatment facilities. intercede in behalf of any individual affected by decisions of the administration. forget you are not in control, you are not GOD.

7 What AA Does and Doesn’t Do AA and BTG DOES- Help people with a desire to stop drinking find a solution.

8 What AA Doesn’t Do Furnish initial motivation Solicit members Charge dues or fees Operate clinics or drying-out facilities Operate clubs Provide housing, meals or transportation Keep membership records Follow-up on errant members Controls its members Hold classes Practice medicine, psychiatry, or nursing Offer religious services Offer professional counseling Accept money from non-members Do research Join councils or social agencies Loan money

9 FOR A.A. INMATES BRIDGING THE GAP PRERELEASE CONTACT PROGRAM Dear Inmate, We have a program in this area called the A.A. Bridging The Gap Prerelease Contact Program. If you sign up, you can be matched upon release to an A.A. member in your home community. This A.A. Prerelease Contact volunteer will take you to up to six A.A. meetings, introduce you around, and help you get acquainted and comfortable in A.A. During this time, you will learn about sponsors, home groups, working A.A.'s Twelve Steps, and service. Your Prerelease Contact is temporary only. They are there to support you, answer questions, and explain the A.A. program of recovery. They will not provide housing, food, clothing, jobs, money, or other such services. You will undoubtedly hear the five basic suggestions for sobriety that the Fellowship shares with all members: Don't Drink, Go to Meetings, Read the Big Book, Call Your Sponsor, and Work the Steps. Past experience has shown that attending an A.A. meeting as soon as possible after release is key to making a sober transition to life outside prison. Many of us have been where you are and know that the program of A.A. and its fellowship can do for you what it has done for us and countless others. Complete the attached Inmate's Application, then cut off and mail it to the address indicated. If possible, do this three to six months prior to your release. The A.A. Prerelease Contact coordinator will then match you up with a Prerelease Contact volunteer in the community where you will be living. That person will write to you with information on how to contact him or her once you are released. Some professionals refer to alcoholism and drug addiction as "substance abuse" or "chemical dependency." Nonalcoholics are, therefore, sometimes introduced to A.A. and encouraged to attend A.A. meetings. Anyone may attend open A.A. meetings, but only those with a drinking problem may attend closed meetings. Program Procedures 1. Inside A.A. members are eligible for this program if they are within three to six months of their release date. 2. The inmate fills in the attached application and mails it to the Bridging The Gap Coordinators, who process all Prerelease Contacts. 3. The Prerelease Contact coordinator will notify the inside member that the application has been received and is being processed. 4. The coordinator finds a Prerelease Contact and then informs the inmate. 5. The Prerelease Contact then writes to the inside A.A. member within two weeks to confirm contact. If the Prerelease Contact fails to make contact, the inside A.A. member should inform the coordinator. 6.The inside A.A. member and the Prerelease Contact set up a meeting at the time of the inmate's release. The inside A.A. should provide such information as date of release, when they will arrive in the local area, an address and phone number. 7.The Prerelease Contact will meet the newly release A.A. at an agreed to time and place to help them adjust to attending their first few meetings in the local community. 8. The Prerelease Contact is asked to let the newly release A.A. know that after a maximum of six meetings, their work together will be done, and that the Prerelease Contact will rotating on to help someone new. 9. After a connection has been completed, the Prerelease Contact will inform the coordinator of the results. INMATE'S APPLICATION I am within six months of my release date. I am requesting an A.A. Bridging The Gap Contact who will provide a link for me to the A.A. community through transportation to meetings and introductions to other A.A.s. Inmate Name: ______________________ Sex: Male: _______ Female: _______ Doc Number: _______________________ Doc Mailing Address: _________________ City: ______________________________ State: ________ Zip Code: ____________ Releasing to: (Town or Area): ___________ ___________________________________ Date of Release: _____________________ Address after Release: ________________ ___________________________________ Phone Number: ______________________ I would like to make a commitment to attend an A.A. meeting within 48 hours of my release. I understand that the A.A. Bridging The Gap Contact is not an A.A. Sponsor. ___________________________ Signature Date District The Bridging Gap Coordinator P.O. Box 455 Draper, UT or if BTG District Coordinator fails to make contact Area Corrections Committee P.O. Box 4 Milford, UT I make a commitment to attend an A.A. meeting within 48 hours of my release.

10 LETTER TO THE TREATMENT PATIENT Dear AA Member, AA in this Area has a Program available for you when you are released. Upon your release, we offer the Bridging The Gap Program. The Bridging The Gap Program is offered to you to help you make the transition back into the outside. This means that you can sign up to be matched to an AA member on the outside in your home community upon release. This AA member will take you to meetings, and introduce you around to help you get acquainted and become comfortable among your new friends in A.A. During this time you learn about sponsors, home groups, working the steps, and service. Your BTG Volunteer is temporary (maximum of six meetings or visits is suggested), and will not follow up or try to control you. Nor will they provide housing, food, clothing, jobs, money or other such services. Past experience has shown that attending an A.A. meeting on the outside as soon after release as possible On the first 24 hours) is one of the most effective tools in making a sober transition into the free world. Many of us have been where you are and know what the program of A.A. and its fellowship can do for you and countless others. If you are within three weeks of release and wish to participate in the Bridging The Gap Program, please complete the attached "Patient Application." Mail it to the address below. When the committee receives it they will contact a BTG Volunteer who will in turn contact you to arrange to meet with you on the day of your release. If you do not receive a letter for this volunteer within two weeks, please contact us, and we will have someone get in contact with you. I am interested in having someone in the AA program meet me when I am released. I understand the importance of making contact with people in the A.A. program on the day of my release and getting to a meeting. Date: Gender: Male Female Release Date: Name: Facility: _________ Address: ______________________ City: ________________ State: ________ Zip Code: ____________ Release City:_______________ Phone No.: __________________ State: __________ Zip Code: _____________ Signature: ________________________________________________________ Mail to: Area Treatment Committee, P.O. Box 147, Moab, UT I am interested in having someone in the AA program meet me when I am released

11 Bridging the Gap BTG Contacts Area 69 District First Name Last Name City Home Phone Contact Type ID Language Contact ID xxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxx xxx


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