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AYP: Making Adequate Yearly Progress in Washington State Spring 2012.

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Presentation on theme: "AYP: Making Adequate Yearly Progress in Washington State Spring 2012."— Presentation transcript:

1 AYP: Making Adequate Yearly Progress in Washington State Spring 2012

2 No Child Left Behind Overview On January 8, 2002, President George Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). This act reauthorized and amended federal education programs established under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) of 1965.The major focus of No Child Left Behind 2002 (also known as ESEA) is to provide all children with a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-quality education. The U.S. Department of Education is emphasizing four pillars within the bill: Accountability: to ensure those students who are disadvantaged, achieve academic proficiency. Flexibility: Allows school districts flexibility in how they use federal education funds to improve student achievement. Research-based education: Emphasizes educational programs and practices that have been proven effective through scientific research. Parent options: Increases the choices available to the parents of students attending Title I schools. NCLB emphasizes the implementation of educational programs and practices that have been demonstrated to be effective. In essence, it is a national extension of the standards-based education reform efforts undertaken in our state since Department of Education, No Child Left Behind:

3 What is Adequate Yearly Progress? The concept of AYP comes from the federal No Child Left Behind legislation which calls for the following: By 2014 it is expected that 100% of all students in all schools nationwide will be proficient in reading and mathematics. In order to reach the 2014 goal, all schools must have a certain – and growing – percentage of their students “meeting proficiency” on the state reading and math exams each year. Under NCLB, all states must test students annually in at least grades 3-8 and

4 How has AYP been Calculated Differently Through the Years? In 2007 calculations for AYP were expanded to include grades 3, 5, 6 & 8. ( included grades 4,7 &10.) In 2008, the “Grade 4,” “Grade 7,” and “Grade 10” uniform bars were named the “Elementary,” the “Middle,” and the “High School” bars. 2

5 Why was there an Increase in Schools and Districts Not Making AYP in 2008? 3 When grades 3,5,6 and 8 were first added to the calculation of AYP, the “N” or “number” of students in subgroups stayed the same (either at 30 or Special Education and Limited English); In the past, at many schools, there were not enough students in the subgroups to trigger an AYP calculation. Consequently, now that AYP is calculated on “grade bands,” the possibility that there are enough students within a subgroup to trigger a calculation is tripled. For the 2008 WASL, the “N” decreased from 40 to 30 for the Special Education and Limited English subgroups.

6 Percent Proficient Reading Math % Participation Reading Math Unexcused Absence/ Graduation Rate All Students American Indian Asian/Pac. Is. Black Hispanic White Special Education Limited English Low Income State Target : 88.1% 6-8: 82.5% HS: 87.2% 3-5: 58% 6-8: 58.7% HS: 62.4% K-12 95% K-8 = 1% allowed HS = 76% for 2011 AYP Matrix (37 “cells” ) – Applies to Each Grade Band Target stays the sameState Bar changes 4 Bars were raised in in 2011 (100% in 2014) Grad Rate Target changes

7 Columns 1 & 2 Proficiency Subgroups Percent Proficient Reading Math All StudentsYES American IndianYES Asian/Pac. Is.YES BlackYES HispanicYES WhiteYES Special EducationYES NO Limited EnglishYES Low IncomeYES State Target : 76.1% 6-8: 65.1% HS: 74.3% 3-5: 64.9% 6-8: 58.7% HS: 62.4% Year 1 Not making AYP Subgroups Percent Proficient Reading Math All StudentsYES American IndianYES Asian/Pac. Is.YES BlackYES HispanicYES WhiteYES Special EducationYES Limited EnglishYES NO Low IncomeYES State Target : 76.1% 6-8: 65.1% HS: 74.3% 3-5: 64.9% 6-8: 58.7% HS: 62.4% Year 2 Not making AYP 5 Different cell Same column

8 How is AYP Calculated? AYP is calculated separately for reading and mathematics within two of the three following indicators: Indicator 1 Proficiency of all subgroups; Students in all subgroups must meet the state bar set for the year in Reading and Math. ELEMENTARY: Reading 88.1% Math 79% State Bar MIDDLE SCHOOL Reading 82.5% Math 79.3% HIGH SCHOOL Reading 87.2% Math 81.2% 6 Includes only students “continuously enrolled” – since the October 1 count.

9 How is AYP Calculated? Indicator 2 Rate of Participation on reading and mathematics MSP/HSPE 7 95% is required; the 5% allowed = students w/excused absences on the day of testing + students who are of Limited English Proficiency. 95% is required; the 5% allowed = students w/excused absences on the day of testing + students who are of Limited English Proficiency. This rate includes all students enrolled in the school at the time of testing.

10 How is AYP Calculated? Indicator 3A Other: Elementary & Middle Schools are evaluated on their unexcused absence rate. 8 Must be 1% or lower. A school makes AYP if it shows improvement over previous year. Improvement must continue each year until 1% or lower is achieved.

11 How is AYP Calculated? Indicator 3B Other: High Schools are evaluated on their graduation rate. A school makes AYP if the rate is increased by at least 2% over the previous year. Improvement must continue at this minimal rate until it reaches the current target. 73% (or higher) for 2010, increasing 3% each year until % (or higher) for 2010, increasing 3% each year until % for % for % for % for % for % for % for % for 2014

12 What is the Uniform State Bar (target)? The state’s uniform bar tells schools and districts what percentage of their students need to be proficient on the MSP/HSPE each year to make AYP. The bar increases every three years, so that by 2014, it shows 100% of Washington students as proficient in reading and mathematics. 10

13 Percent Meeting Standard Elementary Uniform Bar (3-5) Reading Mathematics 11 State Bar was lowered to 58% for 2010 & 2011 because of new math standards implemented.

14 Middle School Uniform Bar (6-8) Percent Meeting Standard Reading Mathematics 12 State Bar remained at 58.7% in 2011 because new math standards were implemented.

15 High School Uniform Bar Percent Meeting Standard Reading Mathematics 13 State Bar remained at 62.4% in 2011 because new math standards were implemented.

16 The Role of Subgroups in AYP Schools and districts must have a minimum number of students in a subgroup before they can report that subgroup’s performance or participation rate. The minimum number of students required in the nine subgroups across all grade levels tested in a school are: All = 10 Low Income = 30 Limited English = 30 Special Education = 30 Five Ethnicity Groups = 30 each 14

17 How do Schools and Districts Make AYP? For the Proficiency columns in Reading and Math there are two ways: 1. All students and each subgroup meet or exceed the AYP targets (state bar for reading & math); or 2. “Safe Harbor” provision: When a school reduces its percentage of non-proficient students in the cells which have not made AYP over the previous year by 10% and meets the unexcused absence rate goal (or at High School, the graduation rate goal) as well. 15

18 For the Participation columns in Reading and Math there is but one way to make AYP: 95% of the students in each subgroup must have taken the tests. How do Schools and Districts Make AYP?

19 For the “Other Indicator”column for Elementary & Middle School there are two ways to make AYP: Schools must meet the state target of no more than 1.0% unexcused absences for the school year; -or- A school may show any amount of improvement over the previous year and continue to make improvement until the target is met.

20 What Happens if a School Doesn’t Make AYP? AYP is reported for all schools and districts, but only schools receiving Title I funds are sanctioned. 16

21 What are the Sanctions for Step 1? If a school receiving Title I funding does not make AYP for two years in a row, it enters Step I of improvement, which requires Developing a two-year improvement plan; Investing in professional development for teachers; Giving parents the option to transfer their children to a higher-performing school in the district. 20% of the District’s Title I grant must be made available for transportation costs. 17

22 AYP Step 1 12 AYP AYP TIMELINE FOR SCHOOLS (Consequences apply only to schools receiving Title I funds) WASL Results WASL Results Spring 2007 Spring 2008 Fall 2008 A. School Improvement Plan B. School Choice STEP 1 Sanctions Identified for School Improvement 18

23 What are the Sanctions Imposed Beyond Step 1? Each additional year a school does not make AYP, it moves to the next step and the sanctions are increased. Schools must: Continue to provide school choice; Continue to use the 2 Year SIP; Out of that year’s Title 1 grant, the same 20% must pay for the provision of supplemental services of an approved provider; Make significant changes to curriculum, staff, etc. 19

24 School Improvement Plan Continue: Public School Choice Continue: Public School Choice Supplemental Services Continue: Public School Choice Supplemental Services Public School Choice Supplemental Services Corrective Action Plan for Alternative Governance AYP Step Implement Plan For Alternative Governance Step 5 12 AYP AYP TIMELINE FOR SCHOOLS (Consequences apply only to schools receiving Title I funds) WASL Results WASL Results Spring 2007 Spring 2008 Fall 2008Fall 2009Fall 2010… Identified for School Improvement Sanctions 20

25 When May a School Exit Improvement? In the proficiency columns for Math and Reading only: or 21 Schools exit improvement once they make AYP for two consecutive years… by having each subgroup within a school reach the state bar; Schools reach and maintain “Safe Harbor” for two consecutive years… by reducing the number of non-proficient students by 10% over the previous year and continuing to do so until the state bar is reached.

26 What Happens if the District Doesn’t Make AYP? A District falls into “improvement “ when it does not make AYP in the same column of the AYP matrix in all three grade bands for 2 consecutive years. Our District did not make AYP for 2007 and 2008 in the “Proficiency” column for math in each of the grade bands – 3-5, 6-8, & 10 (STEP 1 Math); In addition, it did not make AYP for2008 in the “Proficiency” column for reading in each of the grade bands (YEAR 1 Reading); It did not make AYP for 2009 in the “Proficiency” column for reading and math in each of the grade bands (STEP 2 Math; STEP 1 Reading); It did not make AYP for 2010 in the “Proficiency” column for reading and math in each of the grade bands (STEP 2 Math & Reading). It did not make AYP in 2011 in the “Proficiency” column for Reading in the elementary and middle school bands, and for Math in the middle school and high school bands (STEP 2 Math & Reading). 22

27 Evergreen’s AYP JOURNEY When a district does not make AYP in the same column at Elementary, Middle & High School levels for 2 consecutive years, it moves into improvement status. The district does not move into improvement if at least one of the three grade spans makes AYP. ImprovementCell %ES MS HS StatusDetail YEAR 12003: Met AYP in 85 of 101 cellsM & R M & R M & R “Safe Harbor”2004: Met AYP in 68 of 69 cells Made AYP Made AYP Grad Rate “Safe Harbor”2005: Met AYP in 40 of 43 cells M & R Made AYP Made AYP “Safe Harbor”2006: Met AYP in 42 of 43 cells M Made AYP Made AYP YEAR 12007: Met AYP in 65 of 73 cellsM M M STEP : Met AYP in 46 of 67 cellsM & R M & R M & R STEP 22009: Met AYP in 47 of 68 cellsM & R M & R M & R STEP 22010: Met AYP in 51 of 67 cellsM & R M & RM & R STEP 22011: Met AYP in 59 of 71 cellsM & R M & R M & R To move out of Improvement status, a district must make AYP in that column in all three grade spans for 2 consecutive years. It does not move out of improvement if at least one of the three grade spans continues to not make AYP in the designated column, for example, “Math Proficiency.”

28 How Does A District Avoid Moving into Improvement? If one or more of the three grade spans made AYP in the specified column (i.e.: math proficiency) in spring 2008, the District would not have moved into Step 1 improvement during the school year. 23

29 What are the Sanctions for Step 1 at District Level? If a District with Title 1 funding moves into Step I improvement, the following sanctions are applied: All parents are notified prior to the start of school; The District writes an improvement plan; An amount equal to 10% of the Title I allocation must be set aside to use for staff development focused on the content area which caused us to not make AYP; The state may take corrective action, but in Step 2 they must. 24

30 AYP TIMELINE FOR DISTRICTS (Consequences apply only to districts receiving Title I funds) State Responsibility District Improvement Plan District Improvement Plan State Offers Technical Assistance and MAY take Corrective Action State MUST Take Corrective Action Step AYP WASL Results WASL Results Identified for School Improvement Fall 2008Fall 2009Fall 2008Fall 2007 Sanctions 25

31 When May a District Exit Improvement? A District may exit improvement when it makes AYP in all cells within the designated column and in all grade spans for 2 consecutive years. 26 -or- A District may exit improvement when it reaches “Safe Harbor” and remains there for 2 years. This happens if one or two grade level spans makes AYP in the column implicated.


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