Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

All About State Testing 2012-2013 May 24, 2012 Karen Weintraub, Assessment Manager/ District Assessment Coordinator 360-604-4015.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "All About State Testing 2012-2013 May 24, 2012 Karen Weintraub, Assessment Manager/ District Assessment Coordinator 360-604-4015."— Presentation transcript:

1 All About State Testing May 24, 2012 Karen Weintraub, Assessment Manager/ District Assessment Coordinator Ext. 4429

2 Slide 2 What are the MSP, HSPE & and the EOC?  The MSP stands for “Measurements of Student Progress.” It is used for students in grades 3 through 8.  The HSPE stands for “High School Proficiency Exam.” It is used for students at grade 10, and is available through grade 12 for students unable to pass the reading or the writing tests at grade 10.  The EOC stands for “End-of-Course.” It replaces the math and science HSPE and is administered when a student has completed the high school level Integrated 1 & 2 math courses, and the high school Biology course.

3 Slide 3 WCAP “Washington Comprehensive Assessment Program.” The MSP, HSPE and EOC exams all fall under the umbrella of WCAP. (So does the WELPA.) WCAP EOC HSPE WELPA MSP

4 Slide 4 How is the state test different from a school test? A classroom test may be given for a variety of purposes. A classroom test score may or may not be used to help determine a student’s semester or trimester grade, depending upon the purpose of the test. The test’s best use is to inform the teacher of your child’s needs and next steps to learning. It can help the teacher determine what learning needs to be re-taught or taught differently. A state test can be thought of as a good measuring stick for how our students are doing comparatively within our state. It also helps the state to determine where federal and state dollars need to go to best support learning district-to- district, school-to-school. It would never be used to help determine your child’s grade within a subject area.

5 Slide 5 How is the state test different from a district or classroom test? State Test ■ The annual state level assessment shows how districts are doing within the state, how schools are doing within the district, and how students are doing within a school. ■ The assessment enables the state and us to know: What progress we are making toward improving the achievement level of all our students. ■ The state helps to re-direct state and federal dollars to the schools which are most in need of them. District Test ■ Using district level measures, we are able to predict the level of classroom support each student needs toward meeting or exceeding state learning standards. ■ The tests help us to know: What progress our students are making school-to-school, classroom-to- classroom. ■ T he district provides supports which will help the schools to reach their achievement goals. Classroom Test ■ Teachers use tests to find out what their students already know, what they can do, and how well they have learned the skills taught. ■ The tests help them to know: What progress their students are making and what their next teaching step and the student’s next learning step is. ■ The teacher provides support to the student to improve from where they are at.

6 Slide 6 Why do we test?  Statewide testing is important because it helps ensure all public school students, no matter where they go to school, receive a quality education.  Washington students are regularly tested by the state using the MSP to assess their progress as they move through elementary and middle school.  In high school, students are tested by the state using the HSPE and the EOCs on their proficiency of basic skills and must pass specific assessments to be eligible to graduate.

7 Slide 7 What is “OSPI”?  OSPI stands for the “Office of the Superintendent of Public Schools.” It is located in our capitol city, Olympia.  The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) develops and administers all state assessments.  OSPI also reports achievement data for students, schools, districts and the state. This information assists districts and schools in refining instructional practices and curriculum and gives families valuable information about how well their child is doing and where additional help might be needed.  Link to OSPI’s website for additional information and resources:

8 Slide 8 The Washington State Report Card  The Washington State Report Card is available online at  At the Report Card site, you may access Summary information as well as assessment results regarding the following :  MSP & HSPE  EOC (for Math Integrated 1 & 2 this year and to include Biology next year)  AYP – “Adequate Yearly Progress”  WELPA – “Washington English Language Proficiency Assessment” (Replaced of the WLPT II.)

9 Slide 9 When and to whom are the tests given? Grade Band Grade LevelTest TypeTime of Year ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MSP 3 Reading & Math Window: April 29 – May 20 Test dates decided by school 4 Reading, Writing & Math 5 Reading, Math & Science MIDDLE SCHOOL MSP 6 Reading & Math Window: April 29 – May 20 Test dates decided by school 7 Reading, Writing & Math 8 Reading, Math & Science HIGH SCHOOL HSPE/EOC 9 EOC Int 1, 2 or Re-Takes only May 28 th (I) or 30 th (II) 10 Writing & Reading HSPE Re-Takes only: Math & Biology EOC Int I or II &/or Re-Takes Biology EOC &/or Re-Takes March 12 & 13, 14 (Late Start) January/Feb May 28 th (I) &/or May 30 th (II) (Late Start) June 11 Re-Takes only EOC January/Feb. and May/June (Math & Biology) HSPE Mar & Aug (Reading & Writing) 12 Re-Takes only EOC January/Feb. and May/June (Math & Biology) HSPE Mar & Aug (Reading & Writing)

10 Slide 10 How are the scores calculated? Meets Standard LEVEL 4 – Advanced, or exceeds standard. Represents advanced mastery of a subject’s skills and knowledge. Considered as passing. LEVEL 3 – Proficient, or meets standard. Represents mastery of a subject’s skills and knowledge at grade level. Considered as passing Does Not Meet Standard LEVEL 2 – Basic, or below standard. Represents some mastery of a subject’s skills and knowledge. Considered as not passing. LEVEL 1 – Below Basic, or well-below standard. Represents little to no mastery of a subject’s skills and knowledge. Considered as not passing.

11 Slide 11 How does my child’s score affect his/her future in Elementary & Middle School ? Your child’s score should affect his/her academic future in a positive way. Scores are not used to “grade” a student, but are looked at in a way which helps teachers know what your child needs to know and do in order to meet the academic standards.

12 Slide 12 How does my child’s score affect his/her High School Graduation? For the Graduating Class of 1012: Must pass the READING & WRITING HSPE (or alternative); Must pass one MATH EOC or earn two credits of math after Grade 10. For the Graduating Class of 2013 & 2014: Must pass the READING & WRITING HSPE (or alternative); Must pass one MATH EOC (or alternative). For the Graduating Class of 2015: Must pass the READING & WRITING HSPE (or alternative); Must pass both MATH EOCs (or alternative); Must pass the SCIENCE EOC (or alternative).

13 Slide 13 Assessment Options for State Testing English Language Learners (ELL) - Students who qualify for English Language Development (ELD) services:  Testing accommodations plans for ELL students must be documented and placed in the student’s cumulative folder. These include: ■ Spell check/Word Prediction Software ■ Grammar devices ■ Voice recognition software – translation CDs ■ Scribe Exemptions for state testing include students who:  are New Non-English–Proficient (NNEP) and who have not lived in the United States for one year.

14 Slide 14 How you can help: Preparing Students for State Testing  Resources and Tools (sample passages, questions, anchor sets, test and item specifications)  Reading -  Writing -  Mathematics -  Science -  Graduation requirements and resources:

15 Slide 15 ● Your Child’s Progress - A one-page handout that broadly covers learning expectations in grades K-10. It also covers basic information on state testing for grades It is translated into nine languages: Cambodian | Chinese | Korean | Punjabi | Russian | Somali | Spanish | Tagalog | VietnameseCambodianChineseKorean PunjabiRussianSomaliSpanishTagalogVietnamese ● Earning a Diploma - A one-page handout that covers the different requirements for each graduating class. It is translated into the following nine languages: Cambodian | Chinese | Korean | Punjabi | Russian | Somali | Spanish | Tagalog | Vietnamese CambodianChineseKoreanPunjabiRussianSomaliSpanishTagalog Vietnamese ● State Testing This one-page handout covers key testing information and dates on the front and provides answers to FAQs on the back. It is translated into the following nine languages: Cambodian | Chinese | Korean | Punjabi | Russian | Somali | Spanish | Tagalog | VietnameseCambodianChineseKoreanPunjabiRussianSomaliSpanishTagalogVietnamese Other Parent Resources with Translation Available


Download ppt "All About State Testing 2012-2013 May 24, 2012 Karen Weintraub, Assessment Manager/ District Assessment Coordinator 360-604-4015."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google