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1 STUDENT LAUNCH INITIATIVE 2011 – 2012 AIAA OC Rocketeers CDR Presentation February 6, 2011 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers.

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Presentation on theme: "1 STUDENT LAUNCH INITIATIVE 2011 – 2012 AIAA OC Rocketeers CDR Presentation February 6, 2011 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 STUDENT LAUNCH INITIATIVE 2011 – 2012 AIAA OC Rocketeers CDR Presentation February 6, 2011 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

2 Agenda  Introduction of team members (representing 4 high schools in Orange County California)  Scale model testing and results  Full Scale Design VehicleVehicle UAV Payload – Description, Safety, and TestingUAV Payload – Description, Safety, and Testing Recovery System and EventsRecovery System and Events GPSGPS IntegrationIntegration  Feedback form checklist  Risks and Safety  Educational Outreach  Budget and Timeline 2 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

3 3 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Scale Model Testing How it affected the final design

4 4 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Black Powder Calculations Scale rocket is 3” diameter (surface area on a bulkhead is π r 2 or 7.07 in 2).. We need at least 100 lbs of force + another 105lbs for the three #2 Nylon screws. The amount of black powder then is C D 2 L where C is psi * D is the diameter in inches (3), and L is the length in inches (12). PoundsPSI (lbs/in 2 )Black Powder (g) (175lbs / 7.07in 2 ) (200lbs / 7.07in 2 ) (225lbs / 7.07in 2 ) (250lbs / 7.07in 2 )1.53

5 5 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Testing – Black Powder Phenolic Sabot TrialBlack PowderResult (Sabot is 18” long) 1.28 gramNo ejection 21.1 gramsPartial ejection (4” exposed) 31.5 gramsPartial ejection (8” exposed) gramsPartial ejection (15” exposed) 52.0 gramsPartial ejection (10” exposed + damage)

6 6 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Testing – Black Powder Phenolic Sabot  Learned from testing leading to a design change Forces on the sabot are substantial Forces on the sabot are substantial Increasing the black powder charge with a lot of leakage will result in damage before total deployment is reached Increasing the black powder charge with a lot of leakage will result in damage before total deployment is reached Ejecting the sabot towards the avionics bay can contribute to damage through collision Ejecting the sabot towards the avionics bay can contribute to damage through collision We need to change the design to allow for piston deployment to minimize gas leakage through the sabot We need to change the design to allow for piston deployment to minimize gas leakage through the sabot

7 7 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Testing – Black Powder Piston pushing Phenolic Sabot TrialBlack PowderResult (Sabot is 18” long) 61.5 gramsFull ejection but with substantial damage

8 8 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Testing – Black Powder Phenolic Sabot  Learned from testing leading to a design change Piston needs to be made very strong to avoid damage Piston needs to be made very strong to avoid damage We will use Blue Tube filled with foam with double thickness bulkheads for further scale model testing We will use Blue Tube filled with foam with double thickness bulkheads for further scale model testing Sabot needs to be made very strong to avoid damage Sabot needs to be made very strong to avoid damage We will use Blue Tube with double thickness bulkheads for further scale model testing We will use Blue Tube with double thickness bulkheads for further scale model testing Don’t increase Black Powder when using a piston Don’t increase Black Powder when using a piston Keep pressure distributed evenly on contacting parts – an eyebolt pushing on a bulkhead can be catastrophic Keep pressure distributed evenly on contacting parts – an eyebolt pushing on a bulkhead can be catastrophic

9 9 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Testing – Black Powder Piston pushing Bluetube Sabot TrialBlack PowderResult 71.1 gramsSuccessful (no parachute) – no damage 81.1 gramsNot successful (with parachute) gramsSuccessful (with parachute)

10 10 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Testing – Black Powder Rear Section Drogue and Main TrialBlack PowderResult gramsNot successful (with drogue and main) too much leakage through motor gramsSuccessful (with drogue and main parachutes) 12.2gSuccessful (tender descender)

11 11 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Conclusion – Black Powder Testing Sabot EjectionUse Piston Sabot Construction Heavy body tube, heavy bulkheads, foam filled, recessed “U” bolts Sabot Construction Heavy body tube, heavy bulkheads, even pressure across bulkheads Black Powder – front section with sabot 1.25 grams (200 lbs giving 28psi in 85 in 3 ) Black Powder – rear section with drogue and main 1.1 grams (175 lbs giving 25psi in 85 in 3 ) Black Powder – Tender Descender 0.2 grams per manufacturer’s recommendation

12 12 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Scale Test Flight Lucerne Dry Lake 1/14/2012 Scale model was flown at Lucerne Dry Lake in the Mojave Desert on January 14,2012 Flight used engine ejection for a single main parachute Vehicle was stable with an extremely straight flight Parachute deployed and vehicle returned with no damage

13 13 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers How the testing affected the full scale vehicle design Sabot EjectionUse a piston with flat ends (nothing protruding such as eyebolts or “U” bolts) We want bulkhead to bulkhead or padded with parachute or shock cord Piston Construction Use fiberglass coupler tube, ¼” bulkheads reinforced with fiberglass, foam filled, with recessed “U” bolts Sabot Construction Use fiberglass coupler tube, ¼” bulkheads reinforced with fiberglass, “pushed” end needs to be flat with hinge to assure even pressure Black Powder Charges Some additional black powder is necessary to overcome the friction of the Sabot being pushed out, but the piston is very effective so care must be taken to not add too much. Careful testing is required

14 14 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Full Scale Design

15 Vehicle – Full Scale 15 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Length/Diameter125 inches / 5 inches Material.075” thick filament wound Carbon Fiber from Performance Rocketry Shock Cord1” Tubular Nylon Center of Pressure/Center of Gravity94”/78.3”behind nose tip Stability Margin3.14 Launch System / Exit Velocity1” 8ft Rail / 80.4 ft/s

16 Vehicle – Full Scale cont’d 16 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Liftoff Weight20.8 lbs Descent Weight17.8 lbs Preferred MotorAerotech K1050 Thrust to weight ratio11.35 (1050 Newtons average thrust = 236 lbs / 20.8 lb vehicle) Maximum ascent velocity ft/s Maximum acceleration ft/s/s Peak Altitude5244 ft Drogue – Descent rate77.75 ft/s Lower section under Main – Descent rate (Kinetic energy at ground level) 17.4 ft/s (48 ftlb-force) Upper section under its own chute – descent rate (Kinetic energy at ground level) 17.2 ft/s (24.4 ftlb-force) UAV on its own parachute – descent rate (Kinetic energy at ground level if UAV is not released) 18.5 ft/s (5.33 ftlb-force)

17 Vehicle – Forward Section 17 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Nose ConeCarbon Fiber 24” long Body Tube.075” thick Carbon fiber 5” diameter x 56” long Bulkhead½” plywood with fiberglass on both faces with “U” bolt for shock cord attachment Shock Cord1” Tubular Nylon x 20 ft + 4 ft (Piston) SabotCarbon Fiber coupler, split lengthwise, hinged Forward Cavity10” x 5” diameter for ejection charge, shock cord, GPS, and forward section parachute (56” – 5” for avionics bay – 5” for nose cone – 31” for sabot – 5” for piston) Ejection Charge1.5 grams (200 lbs)

18 Vehicle – Avionics Bay 18 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Bay MaterialCarbon Fiber tubing 12” long – coupler for 5” body tube Body Tube.075” thick Carbon fiber 5” diameter x 1” long Bulkhead½” plywood with fiberglass on both faces with closed eye bolt for shock cord attachment Sled1/8” plywood with ¼” threaded rods the entire length ElectronicsHCX and Raven flight computers, Batteries Terminal Blocks (for ejection chg) Aft: Drogue primary and backup, Main primary and backup Forward: UAV deploy primary and backup

19 Vehicle – Rear Section 19 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Body Tube.075” thick Carbon fiber 5” diameter x 38.75” long Centering Rings2ply x 3/32” = 3/16” fiberglass with “U” bolt for shock cord Shock Cord1” Tubular Nylon x 15 ft + 15 ft + 6 ft (across Tender Descender) Rear Cavity12.75” x 5” diameter for ejection charge, shock cord, GPS, and forward section parachute ( ” for tailcone + 4” inside avionics bay – 6” for avionics bay overlap - 27” for motor) Ejection Charge2.24 grams (200lbs) Tender Descender.2 grams (per the data sheet)

20 Aerotech K Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers DesignationK-1050W-SUTotal Weight2128 grams ManufacturerAerotechPropellant Weight 1362 grams Motor TypeSingle UseAverage Thrust N Diameter54.0 mmMaximum Thrust N Length67.6 cmTotal Impulse Ns PropellantWhite Lightning Burn Time2.3 s Cert Organization TRAIsp189 s

21 Launch Simulations 21 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Simulations were run using Rocksim Over 100 simulations were run to fine tune vehicle Dimensions, weights, and launch conditions were varied Once vehicle was designed varied engines to attain 1 mile altitude Verified top speed was still subsonic Verified range with varied winds

22 UAV Payload System 22 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers The UAV System consists of 2.4 GHz RC Control via Spektrum DX MHz telemetry link using X-Bee for Altitude via barometric pressure Speed via pitot tube and pressure sensor Artificial horizon via 3 axis magnetometer 1.2 GHz Video downlink Video data converted to USB for interface similar to web cam Note: Rocket also uses two separate GPS transmitters for tracking

23 UAV Mechanical Components 23 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Mechanically, the UAV is composed of two main parts Bendable wing developed at University of Florida Fuselage, vertical and horizontal stabilizer (modified to fit) from the Electrifly RC Airplane Wing Wingpan 30 inches Weight 12 grams Material Carbon Fiber Fuselage Length 30 inches Weight 140g Material fiberglass Parachute release mechanism is electrically controlled servo activated by one channel of the AR-8000 RC receiver Vehicle with electronics is 1 lb (estimated) Note: Photos from similar UAV and release mechanism at University of Florida Gainesville UAV lab and Electrifly Web Site

24 UAV Bendable Wing 24 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Wing design was developed at University of Florida (UF) for use in UAVs deployed from a tube Wing is fabricated using Carbon Fiber in a vacuum forming heat process Carbon fiber cloth is 6 oz 3K Plain Weave pre-preg Cloth is laid at 45 degree angle to direction of motion of the wing through the air 30 inch wing uses 3 layers of carbon fiber Cloth is laid over the mold and placed in a vacuum bag (mold and vacuum bag are protected with release film The pressure is then lowered as close to 30” of mecury as possible The vacuum bag and contents are baked at 260 – 350 degrees for about 6 hours The wing is then removed and trimmed to size Status: We have one wing given to us from UF and Northrop Grumman is making our mold and loaning us time and supervision on their non-flight autoclave

25 UAV Control Electronics and Operation 25 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Main UAV control is via Radio Control (Spektrum DX-8 transmitter and AR-8000 receiver) on 2.4GHz – This is the default operation Ardupilot Mega (APM) is switchable autopilot to provide autonomous control with Open Source software and support at DIYDrones APM accepts data for flight and telemetry from on-board Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) GPS Receiver 3 Axis accelerometer Airspeed sensor APM and IMU GPSAirspeed Sensor Spektrum DX-8 and Receiver 3 Axis Magnetometer

26 The ArduPilot Mega (APM) 26 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers The ArduPilot Mega is: An Inertial Measurement Unit based autopilot Consists of Arduino based CPU board IMU Shield GPS and Sensors as separate boards Runs Open Source software (Lead programmer Doug Wiebel is one of our mentors) Includes firmware for the autopilot Ground support station software for a PC Is supported by a community at DIY Drones Can be commanded to take over control from RC and act as an autopilot Can be programmed for autonomous flight by a simple mission scripting language Fly to a GPS waypoint Loiter at a waypoing Climb or descend Change speed Land Uses Xbee to transmit telemetry to ground station

27 UAV Support Electronics 27 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Data gathered by the UAV is used by the APM autopilot for flight as well as transmitted real time to a ground station Radio telemetry downlink uses X-Bee transmitter in the UAV and an X-Bee receiver at the ground station on 900 MHz Sensors gather and relay information regarding Airspeed Attitude (for artificial horizon) Altitude Exact location In addition, the UAV carries a video camera Video is transmitted to the ground station via a 1.2 GHz transmitter in the UAV and a matching receiver on the ground Video is fed to the ground station via a video to USB converter – making it appear as a web cam input

28 UAV Electronics System 28 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

29 UAV – Ground Station 29 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers UAV Ground Station Allows RC control of UAV Allows switching between RC control and autonomous flight Displays real time telemetry data Displays real time video from the UAV

30 UAV Safety 30 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers 1.The UAV will descend on parachute until it can be verified it is flightworthy and not fouled on shock cords or shroud lines 2.The UAV detachment from the parachute is manual allowing a human to make the final decision 3.The UAV can be manually switched back to RC control at any time during the flight 4.If RC communications is lost the AR-8000 receiver sends a signal to the APM autopilot to switch to RC control and the AR sets servos and throttles to a preset (low throttle and circle) – needs testing 5.Alternatively, the APM autopilot can be programmed to return to home (needs testing) 6.If power is lost to the APM autopilot it automatically returns to RC control 7.If power is restored to the APM autopilot in flight, it will reload a backup program and restart where it left off

31 UAV Testing 31 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Note:UAV will be built from a commercial “Rifle” almost ready to fly RC plane from Electrifly with the University of Florida bendable wing. We are also using a foam Wild Hawk as a rugged trainer. Integration is at the guidance of Dr. Robert Davey, an aeronautical engineer and retired professor from Cal Poly Pomona 1.Install only RC control with batteries, servos, and power components into the foam Wild Hawk and verify the plane is flightworthy and can be controlled 2.Install the APM autopilot into the foam Wild Hawk and integrate with the ground station and X-Planes for a full “Hardware-in-the-loop” PC simulation on the ground 1.Validate the scripting performs as it is intended 2.Validate the scripting can be changed in the air 3.Validate that control can be switched between RC and APM autopilot 4.Validate the UAV reaction to loss of RC signal 5.Validate the APM autopilot reaction to loss of power and return of power 3.Go to Lucerne Dry Lake and repeat the testing in step 1 (RC only control) and 2 (APM autopilot control with the plane actually in the air 4.Build the Rifle kit as-is with no modifications (i.e. use the wing that came with the Rifle) 5.Repeat steps 2 and 3 with the Rifle 6.Replace the Rifle wing with the bendable carbon fiber wing 7.Go to Lucerne Dry Lake and repeat steps 2 and 3 flying on RC and autopilot 8.Include the vehicle and validate in test flight of full scale vehicle launch

32 Recovery 32 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Recovery System consists of: G-Wiz Partners HCX Flight Computer (4 pyro events) 1.10” x 5.50” 45 grams Accelerometer based altitude Raven Flight Computer (4 pyro events) 1.80" x 0.8" x 0.55." 27 grams accelerometer based altitude Deployment bag with 84” Main Parachute Two Tender Descenders in series (primary and backup) Other Parachutes: 24” Drogue 60” Parachute for top body section 24” Parachute on UAV Avionics Bay is coated with MG Chemicals SuperShield Conductive Coating 841 to minimize RF Interference

33 Recovery Interconnect 33 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Flight computers are powered from Duracell 9VDC batteries Raven CPU and Pyro are on separate batteries HCX CPU and Pyro are on separate batteries Design includes 4 safety switches (CPU power on before pyro) Raven Flight Computer CPU Power HCX Flight Computer CPU Power Raven Flight Compuer Pyro Power HCX Pyro Power

34 Black Powder Charges 34 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers A total of six separate black powder charges are used The Drogue uses one black powder charge from the HCX pyro 2 as primary and one from the Raven pyro 1 as the backup to deploy at apogee The Sabot uses one black powder charge from the HCX pyro 3 as primary and one from the Raven pyro 2 as the backup to deploy at an altitude of 1,000 ft The Main uses one black powder charge from the HCX pyro 4 as primary and one from the Raven pyro 3 as the backup to deploy at an altitude of 800 ft

35 Recovery Events 35 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Redundant Dual Deployment from two different flight computers Deployment consists of three separate events Event #1: Near apogee a black powder charge deploys the drogue parachute Rocket is in two sections tethered together Lower body tube with motor and fins Nose cone, upper body tube with UAV, avionics bay Exposed and on the 1” Nylon shock cord: Drogue fully deployed Main held in bag by Tender Descenders One of two GPS (to clear carbon fiber body tube)

36 Recovery Events 36 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Event #2: At 1000 ft (backup at 900 ft) a second ejection charge separates the rocket further Lower body tube with motor and fins still on drogue tethered to the avionics bay only Upper body tube tethered to the nose cone and the opened sabot is all under another deployed parachute Second GPS is now exposed on the 1” nylon shock cord UAV has deployed from the sabot and is under its own parachute

37 Recovery Events 37 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Event #3: At 850 ft (backup at 750 feet) a third black powder charge in the Tender Descenders deploys the main. There are now three pieces descending Lower body tube with motor and fins still on the main parachute tethered to the avionics bay Upper body tube tethered to the nose cone and opened sabot under its own parachute UAV has deployed from the sabot and is under its own parachute waiting for safe release

38 UAV Events 38 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Event #4 is technically not part of the recovery system but is next in the sequence of events Occurs after successful recovery event #2 at 1,000 ft (altimeter controlled black powder ejection of the sabot with full deployment of the UAV from that hinged-on-one-end sabot via spring pressure from the bendable wing) Full UAV deployment is visually validated Wings have fully unrolled UAV is not tangled in shroud lines or shock cords Appears to try to fly away from the parachute Is safely away from spectators UAV is at or below 400 ft as indicated on the ground station telemetry (per the FAA AC “Do not fly model aircraft higher than 400 feet above the surface”) Range Safety Officer has given the OK The UAV is released by command from the ground via the 2.4GHz RC radio via a servo controlled latch

39 UAV Events 39 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers After the UAV is flying without the parachute First the UAV is flown as an RC plane until it is validated that we have full control and the plane is functioning properly The RC transmitter on the ground sends a signal to the UAV electronics to fly autonomously (via the APM autopilot) The UAV will fly to pre-programmed waypoints (these waypoints can also be changed from the ground station) After the autonomous flight, the RC transmitter will send a signal to the UAV electronics to fly under RC control again The UAV will be landed under RC control

40 40 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Drift During Recovery Lower Sustainer Section I - Drops from 5,280 ft to 1,000 ft at 78 ft/s on 24” drogue II - Drops from 1,000 ft to 850 ft at 61 ft/s on 24” drogue without the top section weight III - Drops from 850 ft to 0 ft at 17.5 ft/s on 84” main Top Section (with UAV) I –Drops from 5,280 ft to 1,000 ft at 78 ft/s on 24” drogue II – Drops from 1,000 ft to 0 ft at 17 ft/s on 60” parachute UAV (if not separated from parachute) I – Drops from 5,280 ft to 1,000 ft at 78ft/s on 24” drogue II – Drops from 1,000 ft to 0 ft at 18.5 ft/s on 24” parachute Lower Sustainer Section Wind (MPH) Wind (ft/s) I - Drogue Range (feet) II - Drogue Range (feet) III - Main Range (feet) Total Range (feet) Top Section Wind (MPH) Wind (ft/s) I - Drogue Range (feet) II - Top Parachute Range (feet) Total Range (feet) Drogue if parachute does not separate Wind (MPH) Wind (ft/s) I - Drogue Range (feet) II – UAV Parachute Range (feet) Total Range (feet)

41 41 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Configuration of the HCX Flight Computer HCX Provides 4 Pyro Ports Pyro 1 – Not Used Pyro 2 – Drogue deployment via black powder charge at Apogee seconds for Mach Delay Pyro 3 – UAV deployment via black powder charge at 1,000 feet Pyro 4 – Main deployment via Tender Descender black powder charge at 800 feet

42 42 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Testing of HCX Flight Computer G-Wiz Partners Flightview Software allows configuration and testing Power-ON: Sign-on beeps verified (2 low beeps for JP7 in followed by status of pyro connections: 1=connected 2=not connected) Pyro Connection beeps: Check all open is 4 double beeps. Short one at a time to hear single beep. Final is since pyro 1 is not used Bench Test: Shows battery voltages, pyro connections (lights), and allows test firing of each pyro – expected light lit Test Flight: Simulated flight validated all three pyros fired (lights lit) when expected

43 43 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Configuration of the Raven Flight Computer The Raven Provides 4 Pyro Ports Pyro 1 – Drogue deployment via black powder charge at Apogee seconds for Mach Delay Pyro 2 – UAV deployment via black powder charge at approximately 1,000 feet (992 feet) Pyro 3 – Main deployment via Tender Descender black powder charge at 800 feet Pyro 4 – Not Used

44 44 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Testing of Raven Flight Computer Pyro Connection beeps: Check all open is 4 low beeps. Short one at a time to hear low pitch change to high pitch beep. Final is H-H-H-L since pyro 4 is not used Test Flight Simulation: Simulated flight validated all three pyros fired (lights lit) when expected After the flight is back on the ground, the Raven must be tilted to start the altitude beeps The “Featherweight Interface Program allows configuration and testing Power-ON: If not vertical gives battery voltage as series of high beeps followed by low beeps every few seconds forever. If vertical gives status of pyro connections (high pitch = connected and low pitch = not connected)

45 GPS TRACKING  Beeline receives GPS position Encodes as AX.25 packet dataEncodes as AX.25 packet data Sends as 1200 baud audio – 1 at each end of 70 cm ham bandSends as 1200 baud audio – 1 at each end of 70 cm ham band  VX-6R switched between two frequencies and extracts audio  TinyTrack 4 converts audio to digital NMEA location data  Garmin displays the digital location data on human screen 45 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Transmitters in Vehicle Big Red Bee Beeline GPS RF: 17mW on 70cm ham band Battery and life: 750mAh 10 Hrs Size: 1.25” x 3” 2 ounces Ground Station Receiver: Yaesu VX-6R TNC: Byonics Tiny Track 4 GPS: Garmin eTrex Legend

46 Payload/Vehicle Integration 46 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Photos from “Development of a Composite Bendable-Wing Micro Air Vehicle” by Dr. Peter Ifju et al URL: UAV is encased in a sabot Protects the UAV from ejection charge Provides a clean method for deploying the vehicle from the body tube Deployment and flight plan Ejection before main at 900 ft UAV will descend under parachute until verified flight-worthy Parachute will be released UAV will fly under RC control If save, UAV will fly pattern under autonomous control Return to RC control for landing

47 Feedback Form Checklist 47 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers NoFeedbackAction 1NAR will provide 8ft rail – not 6ftThis has been changed in RockSim and in the documentation 2Max Mach is.68 – use Mach Delay2 second Mach delay is in HCX and Raven 320 ft recovery is fine, longer is betterRear is no 36 ft total and front is 20 ft + 4ft on piston 4Will there be dedicated arming switch for each altimeter Yes – dedicated CPU and Pyro switches for each altimeter (4 total) 5How long will ematch for Tender Descender be?Ematch wire is accordioned with additional 3 ft extra, protected by nomex sleeve 6Lower stability margin to 3-4Stability margin is now Describe ejection eventsEvents are described in a series of drawings with explanation 8Is charge pushing out sabot manual or altimeter based? Altimeter 9Is the UAV design provenUAV is combination of wing from University of Florida on an Electrifly Rifle RC airplane 10What altitude is the UAV deployed1,000 ft on parachue – 400 ft to fly 11Is parachute on UAV attached to the airframe until 1,000 ft or does it come down from apogee UAV is inside vehicle until it descends to 1,000 ft and is on parachute until 400ft.

48 48 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers NoFeedbackAction 12How will UAV be releasedBy control from a channel on the RC transmitter using a servo 13Will the release mechanism be manual or automaticManual 14What is KE of UAV under the UAV parachute5.33 ft lbs force K.E. = ½ ( (m*0.454) * (v *.305) 2 ) * m in lbs, v in ft/s – 1 lb UAV on chute falls at 18.5 ft/s K.E. = ½((1*0.454) * (18.5 *.305) 2 ) * How far will parachute drift after UAV is releasedWhen the parachute is released from the Sabot, the shroud lines are no longer held at a point – 1 shroud line has a small ½ oz weight which comes down like a streamer. This will keep it within the 2,500 ft 16Is the UAV manually controlled on the way down. If communications is lost what is failsafe UAV is controlled manually. If signal is lost Spektrum RC has 3 failsafe modes. We will set it to lower the throttle and circle to descend. Alternatively, the APM can be set to return to home 17If power is lost to control system and then comes back on what happens The APM will automatically switch to RC when power is lost. If power is restored it can restart and pick up where it left off 18How much load can the wing handle before it fails9 lbs (per University of Florida’s testing) 19Has the team referenced AC We may need to file a waiver We have downloaded and read (“Do not fly model aircraft higher than 400 feet above the surface”) and will look into the waiver At CDR and FRR present details on the fail-safe mechanism for the UAV, both in design and control (see UAV safety slide) The UAV system will need to be tested in its full configuration during the full-scale flight test The team should investigate the possibility of filing a waiver to FAA AC-91-57

49 Risks 49 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers 5 Risk: The rocket weather cocks 10 Risk: The Rocket lands in mud 15 Risk: A parachute misfires 20 Risk: The tracking device isn’t accurate 25 Risk: The UAV hits an object 30 Risk: The battery(s) of our electronics bay fall out 4 Risk: The engine “chuffs” 9 Risk: The rocket lands in a dangerous area 14 Risk: The batteries die during launch 19 Risk: A servo cable on the UAV catches 24 Risk: A part or battery disconnects 29 Risk: No recovery system 3 Risk: the rocket struggles off the launch pad 8 Risk: Interference of the lawmate video transmitter and xbee telemetry 13 Risk: a parachute fires at the wrong alititude 18 Risk: The electronics in the UAV over heat 23 Risk: Sheer pins aren’t put in place 28 Risk: Loss in signal via controller 2 Risk: The rocket folds upon itself 7 Risk: The parachute tangles around the UAV 12 Risk: The engine explodes 17 Risk: The UAV Motor propeller breaks during sabot release 22 Risk: Tracking device is damaged in launch 27 Risk: The black powder is not the correct amount 1 Risk: rocket misfires Mitigation: check continuity 6 Risk: The Parachute doesn’t detach from the UAV 11 Risk: The Rocket’s fins break 16 Risk: The altimeters aren’t set to fire the parachutes 21 Risk: Tracking device doesn’t transmit radio waves 26 Risk: The electric match doesn’t ignite the black powder

50 Risks Mitigation 50 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers 5 Mitigation: the design is not over stable 10 Mitigation: Make sure launch site is dry 15 Mitigation: double check programming on the altimeter is correct 20 Mitigation: Make sure tracking device works 25 Mitigation: UAV can be switched from autopilot to manual mode Each member in the payload subsection will know how to fly the UAV 30 Mitigation: zip tie batteries and double check connection 4 Mitigation: make sure igniter is all the way in the engine 9 mitigation: Launch site is clear of all hazardous materials 14 Mitigation: use fresh batteries 19 Mitigation: test the cables before flight and have a large enough opening 24 Mitigation: use strong connectors and zip ties to secure wires 29 Mitigation: Double-check our rocket is set up correctly 3 Mitigation: use the correct size launch rod 8 Mitigation: Make sure that the frequencies do not interfere with one another 13 Mitigation: double check programming on the altimeter is correct 18 Mitigation: Air vents will be placed for the entering and exiting of air – this will provide enough ventilation 23 Mitigation: double check the rocket before placing on the launch pad 28 Mitigation: using a 2.4GHZ radio for long range and less interferences 2 Mitigation: body tube and nose cone are fiberglass 7 Mitigation: Make sure the parachute is correctly folded 12 Mitigation: make sure there is no defects in engine 17 Mitigation: A folding propeller will be used – this opens up when the motor powers on. 22 Mitigation: Make sure Tracking device is secure and is fully encased in the Styrofoam 27 Mitigation: have a backup charge to either “blow it out or blow it up” 1 Mitigation: check continuity 6 Mitigation: Check harnesses and linkages 11 Mitigation: Use in wall fins 16 Mitigation: double check programming on the altimeter is correct 21 Mitigation: double check tracking device is on 26 Mitigation: make sure there electric match is touching the black powder

51 Safety 51 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Follow NAR and TRA safety rules for launch Safe material usage restrictions Safe distance from launch pad Safe recovery area Inspection by range safety officer before flight Follow our check list when preparing for launch Have fire extinguisher and first aid kit on site Follow our own (AIAA OC Section Rocketry) safety rules for shop MSDS referred to as needed (can be found on our web site) Manuals are posted on the web site since they contain set-up information for recovery electronics Presentation given to all team members with their signature that they attended and understand

52 Educational Outreach 52 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Space 2011 Education Alley (Sept – too early for credit) Girl scout workshop and launch outing in October/November 2011 Talk at St Norbert school January 2012 Talk at Montesorri school in Fullerton January 2012 Giving presentation to AIAA professional society council meeting with all AIAA members in Orange County invited in 2012 Newspaper articles Article in Sunny Hills High School (Fullerton, CA) school paper Try for article in local paper in Orange, CA – The Foothills Sentry Presentations at Orange County 4H clubs Contact Discovery Science Center for youth booth Youth Expo at the Orange County Fair Grounds April 2012

53 Budget - Expenditures 53 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

54 Budget – Income 54 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers NASA Grant for SLI teams Fundraising letters Boeing Raytheon Northrop Grumman Lockheed Martin Thirty other aerospace related companies Sees candy sales Beg for support from parents

55 Timeline 55 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

56 Thank you for letting us be part of SLI again 56 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC RocketeersQuestions?


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