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1 STUDENT LAUNCH INITIATIVE 2011 – 2012 OC Rocketeers PDR Presentation December 12, 2011 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers.

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Presentation on theme: "1 STUDENT LAUNCH INITIATIVE 2011 – 2012 OC Rocketeers PDR Presentation December 12, 2011 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 STUDENT LAUNCH INITIATIVE 2011 – 2012 OC Rocketeers PDR Presentation December 12, 2011 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

2 Agenda  Introduction of team members (representing 4 high schools in Orange County California)  Mission statement  Partners in Industry and Education  Vehicle DesignDesign Dual Deployment Recovery SystemDual Deployment Recovery System GPS TrackingGPS Tracking  Engineering payload  Risks and Safety  Educational Outreach  Sustainability of rocketry projects in Orange County, CA  Budget and Timeline  Status and Next Milestones 2 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

3 Mission Statement We, the OC Rocketeers, will construct and launch a rocket that will reach a mile high while deploying an UAV. The rocket will include a dual deploy recovery and will remain reusable. We, the OC Rocketeers, will construct and launch a rocket that will reach a mile high while deploying an UAV. The rocket will include a dual deploy recovery and will remain reusable. 3 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

4 Partners in Industry This year’s project requires new and varied expertise. We have turned to industry and education for guidance in the following areas: Small RC Aircraft DesignSmall RC Aircraft Design Bendable Wing TechnologyBendable Wing Technology Autonomous flight electronicsAutonomous flight electronics Composite materials constructionComposite materials construction High power rocketry experienceHigh power rocketry experience 4 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

5 Small RC Aircraft Design Dr. Robert Davey 5 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Retired aeronautical engineering professor from Cal Poly Pomona Air ForcePilot T37s and T38s Designed instruments for Viking Mars Landers and Pioneer Venus Probe Designed instrumentation for meteorological research Over 50 years of RC airplane experience Past mayor of Duarte, CA

6 Bendable Wing Technology Dr. Peter Ifju 6 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Professor at UF Gainesville Author of several papers on the design and mechanics of Micro Air Vehicles Developed bendable wing technology for small UAVs for military and DARPA Co-holds patent on that technology Gave team a wing and shared details of construction so we could make our own

7 Autonomous Flight Electronics Doug Wiebel 7 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers PhD Student and research associate at University of Colorado Full scale pilot as well as avid RC Flyer Lead for the open source software development team for the ArduPilot Mega autopilot at DIY Drones that we are using Considered that team’s fixed wing expert

8 Composite Materials Construction Mike Kramer 8 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Director of Research and Development for Ducommun Aero Structures Over 23 yrs experience in composite structure, design and development Holds degree in Engineering Mechanics – Polymers and composites Awarded patent for manufacturing multi-walled composite structures Avid rocketeer, Rocketry Organization of California (ROC) member, youth mentor, NAR Level 3

9 High Power Rocketry Experience Mike Stoop 9 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Owner of Mad Cow Rocketry NAR Level 3 and California Pyro 3 Has built, designed, and flown hundreds of rockets Has flown well over 15 dual deploy on “K” and above (many on “M” or above)

10 Vehicle – Full Sized (scale model will be 4” diameter fiberglass) 10 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Length/Diameter119 inches / 5 inches MaterialCarbon Fiber Shock Cord1” Tubular Nylon Center of Pressure/Center of Gravity86.93”/71.45”behind nose tip Stability Margin3.1 Launch System / Exit Velocity1” 6ft Rail/ 70.8 ft/s

11 Vehicle – Full Sized cont’d 11 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Liftoff Weight20.8 lbs Descent Weight17.8 lbs Preferred MotorAerotech K1050 Thrust to weight ratio11.35 (1050 Newtons average thrust = 236 lbs / 20.8 lb vehicle) Maximum ascent velocity ft/s Maximum acceleration458.3 ft/s/s Peak Altitude5178 ft Drogue – Descent rate77.75 ft/s Lower section under Main – Descent rate (Kinetic energy at ground level) 17.4 ft/s (48 ftlb-force) Upper section under its own chute – descent rate (Kinetic energy at ground level) 17.2 ft/s (24.4 ftlb-force)

12 Vehicle – Forward Section 12 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Nose ConeCarbon Fiber 14” long Body TubeCarbon fiber 5” diameter x 51.5” long Bulkhead3 ply x 3/32” = 9/32” fiberglass with “U” bolt for shock cord attachment Shock Cord1” Tubular Nylon SabotCarbon Fiber coupler, split lengthwise, hinged Forward Cavity8.5” x 5” diameter for ejection charge, shock cord, GPS, and forward section parachute (51.5” – 6” for avionics bay – 6” for nose cone – 31” for sabot) Ejection Charge1.5 grams

13 Vehicle – Avionics Bay 13 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Bay MaterialCarbon Fiber tubing 12” long – coupler for 5” body tube Body TubeCarbon fiber 5” diameter x 1” long Bulkhead3 ply x 3/32” = 9/32” fiberglass with “U” bolt for shock cord attachment Sled1/8” plywood with ¼” threaded rods the entire length ElectronicsHCX and Raven flight computers, Batteries Terminal Blocks (for ejection chg) Aft: Drogue primary and backup, Main primary and backup Forward: UAV deploy primary and backup

14 Vehicle – Rear Section 14 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers ParameterDetails Body TubeCarbon fiber 5” diameter x 38.75” long Centering Rings2ply x 3/32” = 3/16” fiberglass with “U” bolt for shock cord Shock Cord1” Tubular Nylon Rear Cavity12.75” x 5” diameter for ejection charge, shock cord, GPS, and forward section parachute ( ” for tailcone + 4” inside avionics bay – 6” for avionics bay overlap - 27” for motor) Ejection Charge2.0 grams (250lbs – 13psi) Tender Descender.33 grams (per the data sheet)

15 Aerotech K Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers DesignationK-1050W-SUTotal Weight2128 grams ManufacturerAerotechPropellant Weight 1362 grams Motor TypeSingle UseAverage Thrust N Diameter54.0 mmMaximum Thrust N Length67.6 cmTotal Impulse Ns PropellantWhite Lightning Burn Time2.3 s Cert Organization TRAIsp189 s

16 GPS TRACKING  Beeline receives GPS position Encodes as AX.25 packet dataEncodes as AX.25 packet data Sends as 1200 baud audio – 1 at each end of 70 cm ham bandSends as 1200 baud audio – 1 at each end of 70 cm ham band  VX-6R switched between two frequencies and extracts audio  TinyTrack 4 converts audio to digital NMEA location data  Garmin displays the digital location data on human screen 16 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Transmitters in Vehicle Big Red Bee Beeline GPS RF: 17mW on 70cm ham band Battery and life: 750mAh 10 Hrs Size: 1.25” x 3” 2 ounces Ground Station Receiver: Yaesu VX-6R TNC: Byonics Tiny Track 4 GPS: Garmin eTrex Legend

17 17 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Drift During Recovery Lower Sustainer Section I - Drops from 5,280 ft to 1,000 ft at 78 ft/s on 24” drogue II - Drops from 1,000 ft to 850 ft at 61 ft/s on 24” drogue without the top section weight III - Drops from 850 ft to 0 ft at 17.5 ft/s on 84” main Top Section (with UAV) I –Drops from 5,280 ft to 1,000 ft at 78 ft/s on 24” drogue II – Drops from 1,000 ft to 0 ft at 17 ft/s on 60” parachute UAV (if not separated from parachute) I – Drops from 5,280 ft to 1,000 ft at 78ft/s on 24” drogue II – Drops from 1,000 ft to 0 ft at 18.5 ft/s on 24” parachute Lower Sustainer Section Wind (MPH) Wind (ft/s) I - Drogue Range (feet) II - Drogue Range (feet) III - Main Range (feet) Total Range (feet) Top Section Wind (MPH) Wind (ft/s) I - Drogue Range (feet) II - Top Parachute Range (feet) Total Range (feet) Drogue if parachute does not separate Wind (MPH) Wind (ft/s) I - Drogue Range (feet) II – UAV Parachute Range (feet) Total Range (feet)

18 Recovery 18 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Recovery System consists of: G-Wiz Partners HCX Flight Computer (4 pyro events) 1.10” x 5.50” 45 grams Accelerometer based altitude Raven Flight Computer (4 pyro events) 1.80" x 0.8" x 0.55." 27 grams accelerometer based altitude Deployment bag with 84” Main Parachute Two Tender Descenders in series (primary and backup) Other Parachutes: 24” Drogue 60” Parachute for top body section 24” Parachute on UAV Avionics Bay is coated with MG Chemicals SuperShield Conductive Coating 841 to minimize RF Interference

19 Recovery Interconnect 19 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Flight computers are powered from Duracell 9VDC batteries Design includes 4 safety switches Raven Flight Computer Power (normally open) HCX Flight Computer CPU Power (normally open) HCX Pyro Power (normally open) HCX Pyro Shunt (normally closed – last to be switched)

20 Recovery Events 20 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Redundant Dual Deployment from two different flight computers Deployment consists of three separate events Event #1: Near apogee a black powder charge deploys the drogue parachute Rocket is in two sections tethered together Lower body tube with motor and fins Nose cone, upper body tube with UAV, avionics bay Exposed and on the 1” Nylon shock cord: Drogue fully deployed Main held in bag by Tender Descenders One of two GPS (to clear carbon fiber body tube)

21 Recovery Events 21 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Event #2: At 1000 ft (backup at 900 ft) a second ejection charge separates the rocket further Lower body tube with motor and fins still on drogue tethered to the avionics bay only Upper body tube tethered to the nose cone and the opened sabot is all under another deployed parachute Second GPS is now exposed on the 1” nylon shock cord UAV has deployed from the sabot and is under its own parachute

22 Recovery Events 22 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Event #3: At 850 ft (backup at 750 feet) a third black powder charge in the Tender Descenders deploys the main. There are now three pieces descending Lower body tube with motor and fins still on the main parachute tethered to the avionics bay Upper body tube tethered to the nose cone and opened sabot under its own parachute UAV has deployed from the sabot and is under its own parachute waiting for safe release

23 Launch Simulations 23 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Simulations were run using Rocksim Over 100 simulations were run to fine tune vehicle Dimensions, weights, and launch conditions were varied Once vehicle was designed varied engines to attain 1 mile altitude Verified top speed was still subsonic Verified range with varied winds

24 UAV Payload System 24 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers The UAV System consists of 2.4 GHz RC Control via Spektrum DX MHz telemetry link using X-Bee for Altitude via barometric pressure Speed via pitot tube and pressure sensor Artificial horizon via 3 axis magnetometer 1.2 GHz Video downlink Video data converted to USB for interface similar to web cam Note: Rocket also uses two separate GPS transmitters for tracking

25 UAV Design 25 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Fuselage length: 30 inches Wingspan: 30 inches Weight: 1 lb Material Wing: Carbon Fiber Composite Fuselage: Carbon Fiber Composite Electronics Selectable RC control or Autonomous Real Time video Telemetry GPS Position 3 axis accelerometer Airspeed Microswitch and solid state relays turn electronics ON when UAV deploys Note: Photo from similar UAV at University of Florida Gainesville UAV lab

26 UAV Electronics System 26 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

27 Main UAV Electronics 27 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Ardupilot Mega Autopilot GPS MediaTek MT3329 Axis Magnetometer - Arduino CPU board - Position for autopilot - Telemetry for gnd stn - IMU “Shield/Oil Pan” - Position for ground stn X-Bee 900 MHz tx Sony Video Camera Lawmate Video Tx - Relays telemetry data - provides real time video - Relays video real time - Position information

28 UAV – Bendable Wing 28 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Developed by Peter Ifju and others at the University of Florida in Gainesville Uses molded carbon fiber cloth Functional airfoil is also like a tape measure – it can be bent but straightens back out Dr Ifju shared the design and fabrication techniques with us He gave us one wing We had that wing digitized through a 3d laser imaging firm (resulting in an.igs file) A mentor helped us create a digital file for use with a CNC machine We are looking for some inexpensive time on a CNC machine so we can create a mold to make our own wings

29 UAV – Bendable Wing 29 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

30 UAV – Bendable Wing Fabrication 30 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers All photos taken at the composites lab at University of Florida Gainesville Foam Mold Release Film + Carbon Fiber Release Film Vacuum Bag Place into oven Vacuum and bake

31 UAV – Ground Station 31 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers UAV Ground Station Allows RC control of UAV Allows switching between RC control and autonomous flight Displays real time telemetry data Displays real time video from the UAV

32 Payload/Vehicle Integration 32 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Photos from “Development of a Composite Bendable-Wing Micro Air Vehicle” by Dr. Peter Ifju et al URL: UAV is encased in a sabot Protects the UAV from ejection charge Provides a clean method for deploying the vehicle from the body tube Deployment and flight plan Ejection before main at 900 ft UAV will descend under parachute until verified flight-worthy Parachute will be released UAV will fly under RC control If save, UAV will fly pattern under autonomous control Return to RC control for landing

33 Risks 33 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers 5 Risk: The rocket weather cocks 10 Risk: The Rocket lands in mud 15 Risk: A parachute misfires 20 Risk: The tracking device isn’t accurate 25 Risk: The UAV hits an object 30 Risk: The battery(s) of our electronics bay fall out 4 Risk: The engine “chuffs” 9 Risk: The rocket lands in a dangerous area 14 Risk: The batteries die during launch 19 Risk: A servo cable on the UAV catches 24 Risk: A part or battery disconnects 29 Risk: No recovery system 3 Risk: the rocket struggles off the launch pad 8 Risk: Interference of the lawmate video transmitter and xbee telemetry 13 Risk: a parachute fires at the wrong alititude 18 Risk: The electronics in the UAV over heat 23 Risk: Sheer pins aren’t put in place 28 Risk: Loss in signal via controller 2 Risk: The rocket folds upon itself 7 Risk: The parachute tangles around the UAV 12 Risk: The engine explodes 17 Risk: The UAV Motor propeller breaks during sabot release 22 Risk: Tracking device is damaged in launch 27 Risk: The black powder is not the correct amount 1 Risk: rocket misfires Mitigation: check continuity 6 Risk: The Parachute doesn’t detach from the UAV 11 Risk: The Rocket’s fins break 16 Risk: The altimeters aren’t set to fire the parachutes 21 Risk: Tracking device doesn’t transmit radio waves 26 Risk: The electric match doesn’t ignite the black powder

34 Risks Mitigation 34 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers 5 Mitigation: the design is not over stable 10 Mitigation: Make sure launch site is dry 15 Mitigation: double check programming on the altimeter is correct 20 Mitigation: Make sure tracking device works 25 Mitigation: UAV can be switched from autopilot to manual mode Each member in the payload subsection will know how to fly the UAV 30 Mitigation: zip tie batteries and double check connection 4 Mitigation: make sure igniter is all the way in the engine 9 mitigation: Launch site is clear of all hazardous materials 14 Mitigation: use fresh batteries 19 Mitigation: test the cables before flight and have a large enough opening 24 Mitigation: use strong connectors and zip ties to secure wires 29 Mitigation: Double-check our rocket is set up correctly 3 Mitigation: use the correct size launch rod 8 Mitigation: Make sure that the frequencies do not interfere with one another 13 Mitigation: double check programming on the altimeter is correct 18 Mitigation: Air vents will be placed for the entering and exiting of air – this will provide enough ventilation 23 Mitigation: double check the rocket before placing on the launch pad 28 Mitigation: using a 2.4GHZ radio for long range and less interferences 2 Mitigation: body tube and nose cone are fiberglass 7 Mitigation: Make sure the parachute is correctly folded 12 Mitigation: make sure there is no defects in engine 17 Mitigation: A folding propeller will be used – this opens up when the motor powers on. 22 Mitigation: Make sure Tracking device is secure and is fully encased in the Styrofoam 27 Mitigation: have a backup charge to either “blow it out or blow it up” 1 Mitigation: check continuity 6 Mitigation: Check harnesses and linkages 11 Mitigation: Use in wall fins 16 Mitigation: double check programming on the altimeter is correct 21 Mitigation: double check tracking device is on 26 Mitigation: make sure there electric match is touching the black powder

35 Safety 35 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Follow NAR and TRA safety rules for launch Safe material usage restrictions Safe distance from launch pad Safe recovery area Inspection by range safety officer before flight Follow our check list when preparing for launch Have fire extinguisher and first aid kit on site Follow our own (AIAA OC Section Rocketry) safety rules for shop MSDS referred to as needed (can be found on our web site) Manuals are posted on the web site since they contain set-up information for recovery electronics Presentation given to all team members with their signature that they attended and understand

36 Educational Outreach 36 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Space 2011 Education Alley (Sept – too early for credit) Girl scout workshop and launch outing in October/November 2011 Giving presentation to AIAA professional society council meeting with all AIAA members in Orange County invited in 2012 Newspaper articles Article in Sunny Hills High School (Fullerton, CA) school paper Try for article in the Orange County Register Try for article in local paper in Orange, CA – The Foothills Sentry Presentations at Orange County 4H clubs Contact Discovery Science Center for youth booth Youth Expo at the Orange County Fair Grounds

37 Sustainability of youth rocketry Orange County, CA 37 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers Monthly build sessions as NAR Section #718 Monthly launches with local clubs (Rocketry Organization of California - ROC, Diego Area Rocket Team –DART, and Tripoli San Diego Annual booth at the Education Alley portion of Space (2012 and beyond) Annual booth at Youth Expo at the Orange County Fairgrounds Maintain web site at promoting rocketry and providing information at all levelshttp://aiaaocrocketry.org

38 Budget - Expenditures 38 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

39 Budget – Income 39 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers NASA Grant for SLI teams Fundraising letters Boeing Raytheon Northrop Grumman Lockheed Martin Sees candy sales

40 Timeline 40 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers

41 Status and Next Milestones 41 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC Rocketeers MilestoneStatus Full Size Rocket DesignComplete Scale Model Rocket DesignComplete Scale Model Rocket BuildScheduled Start 12/17 (break) Scale Model Rocket LaunchEarly January 2012 UAV conceptual designComplete UAV Hardware identifiedComplete UAV Bendable WingLooking for CNC machine time UAV Materials (except mold)Complete UAV Final DesignJanuary 2012 UAV Build and TestJanuary – February 2012

42 Thank you for letting us be part of SLI again 42 Student Launch Initiative AIAA OC RocketeersQuestions?


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