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Internet Safety and Dealing with Cyberbullies Barry Puryear.

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Presentation on theme: "Internet Safety and Dealing with Cyberbullies Barry Puryear."— Presentation transcript:

1 Internet Safety and Dealing with Cyberbullies Barry Puryear

2 Internet Safety and Dealing with Cyberbullies Motivations – Boy Scout Handbook First Class requirement: “Describe the three things you should avoid doing related to use of the Internet.” “Describe a cyberbully and how you should respond to one.” – The Internet has real risks, especially for youth.

3 The Internet – What's it Good For? A whole world of information:  Research for homework  Information about hobbies  Entertainment Communication:  E-mail  Instant messaging  Twitter  Social networking sites (MySpace, Facebook)

4 The Internet – Are There Risks? Information found on the Internet may not always be correct.  Homework based on just a site or two may be wrong!  Incorrect hobby information might lead you to do something dangerous. Entertainment content may not be legal to download.  Downloading songs and movies may land you in court!

5 The Internet – Are There Risks? There are lots of not-so-nice people online: – Thieves (online fraud, “phishing”) – Online attackers Break-ins Denial-of-service – Online predators Most dangerous of all They don't just want to harm your computer, they want to harm people.

6 The Internet – What are the Risks? Communication:  Spam: Not just lunch meat any more!  E-mail and instant messaging virus and “Trojan horse” attachments.  Threatening or obscene e-mails and instant messages.  Twitter and the social networking sites have similar risks.

7 The Internet – How do I Stay Safe? Technology can help  Anti-virus software Norton, McAffe, many, many others.  Internet firewall (hardware or software) Firewall/router hardware Windows Firewall  Spam filtering software Many Internet Service Providers (ISP) offer this.  Instant messaging filtering software

8 The Internet – How do I Stay Safe? Technology can help – Web filtering software – Parental control software CyberPatrol, Safe Eyes, OpenDNS, Windows Vista Parental Controls. Your ISP may offer parental controls. The best parental control is still parental involvement. Technology is not a magic bullet. You must use your judgment, as well.

9 The Internet – How can Youths Stay Safe? Ultimately, it's up to each of us to stay safe. Three guidelines for Internet safety:  Don't respond to inappropriate messages or Web sites. If you see something you don't understand, it's OK to ask a parent.  Don't share personal information: Address, phone number School name Never send photos without parent's permission!

10 The Internet – How can Youths Stay Safe? Three guidelines for Internet safety (continued):  Never agree to actually meet anyone you only know only from online contact unless a parent goes with you!

11 Example – Is This Safe? “Do your parents both work?”  Seems innocent, but may allow a stranger to figure out if you are home alone in the afternoons.  Not a safe question!

12 Exercise Is this a safe question? – It's not that late. When do you need to be at school, tomorrow?

13 Exercise Is this a safe question? – It's not that late. When do you need to be at school, tomorrow? – NO! The answer gives away your weekday morning schedule to a stranger.

14 Exercise Is this a safe question? – Did you see that Miley Cyrus special on TV last night? Wasn't that great?

15 Exercise Is this a safe question? – Did you see that Miley Cyrus special on TV last night? Wasn't that great? – Not sure. It may be completely innocent, but the person on the other end may be an adult pretending to be a teenager. – Unless you are absolutely sure who is on the other end, caution is advised.

16 Exercise Is this a safe question? – Ru l33t? I can haz ur warez?

17 Exercise Is this a safe question? – Ru l33t? I can haz ur warez? – Strangely enough, no. – Loosely translated, it really says is: “Are you an elite hacker? Can I have your software?” – This is an invitation to share illicit software, possibly as a prelude to illegal activity.

18 Cyberbullying A cyberbully uses electronic communications to: – Harass others – Threaten others – Harm others

19 Cyberbully Tactics “Dissing” – Spreading damaging gossip. Harassment – Repeatedly sending hateful messages. Impersonation – Pretending to be someone else and posting damaging information to harm another person's reputation.

20 What to do About a Cyberbully Do not try to retaliate! Ask the cyberbully to stop. Do not be aggressive or emotional. Tell the cyberbully that you will take further steps if he does not stop. If the cyberbully still does not stop, tell a parent or guardian.

21 What to do About a Cyberbully Cyberbullies think that they are anonymous, but they are often easily traced by computer professionals; your Internet service provider (ISP) may be able to help.

22 What to do About a Cyberbully? Cyberbully may be in violation of his or her ISP acceptable use policy. – Cyberbully's ISP may be able to take action. State and Federal laws may also apply, depending on the nature of the bullying. Lawsuits may be possible depending on the nature of the bullying. Specific anti-cyberbullying legislation is pending in some states and in the U.S. Congress.

23 Effects of Cyberbullying Some effects of cyberbullying on the victim: –Lowered self-esteem –Anxiety –Poor performance in school or work –Depression

24 How to Avoid Cyberbullies Be a good Internet citizen: – Don't post information that could be used against you or others. – Stay away from sites that tolerate and encourage cyberbullying. – The Scout Oath and Scout Law apply equally well online as they do in the “real world”.

25 Recognizing Cyberbullying What kind of cyberbullying is this? – A youth receives a large number of taunting and threatening e-mails at home. The e-mails seem to be anonymous.

26 Recognizing Cyberbullying What kind of cyberbullying is this? – A youth receives a large number of taunting and threatening e-mails at home. The e-mails seem to be anonymous. – This is harassment. If the threats include threats of violence, law enforcement should be contacted. – Keep examples of the e-mails, trying to keep the “full header” information, which allows for tracing the sender. Your ISP may be able to help.

27 Recognizing Cyberbullying What kind of cyberbullying is this? – A youth discovers that someone has built a MySpace page in his name, complete with lots of false, unflattering details. Also, the victim starts hearing complaints about the vicious e- mails he has been sending to his friends, even though he did not send any e-mails.

28 Recognizing Cyberbullying What kind of cyberbullying is this? – A youth discovers that someone has built a MySpace page in his name, complete with lots of false, unflattering details. Also, the victim starts hearing complaints about the vicious e-mails he has been sending to his friends, even though he did not send any e-mails. – This is impersonation. The victim should contact MySpace to get the page taken down. The victim should try to get examples of the fake e-mails, once again with full header information.

29 Your Turn Tabletop exercise – Form into groups. – In your group, take a few minutes to write down 3 to 5 scenarios of possible Internet risks. Try to include at least one example of cyberbullying. – Exchange your list with another group. – Tell your partner group whether you think each scenario is an unsafe situation, and if so, why.

30 Resources FBI Parents' Guide to Internet Safety: – www.fbi.gov/publications/pguide/pguidee.htm NetSmartz – www.netsmartz.org Microsoft Online Safety – www.microsoft.com/protect Boy Scout Handbook, 2010 Edition

31 Questions or Comments


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