Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Is punctuation necessary? Read the following sentence: Cora said John is acting silly. Add some punctuation and the sentence means something entirely different:

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Is punctuation necessary? Read the following sentence: Cora said John is acting silly. Add some punctuation and the sentence means something entirely different:"— Presentation transcript:

1 Is punctuation necessary? Read the following sentence: Cora said John is acting silly. Add some punctuation and the sentence means something entirely different: “Cora,” said John, “is acting silly.”

2 If you were reading these sentences aloud, you’d make them sound different. Try it! Cora said John is acting silly. “Cora,” said John, “is acting silly.” When you write, you need a way to show where the stops and starts and pauses go. That’s what punctuation is for!

3 Commas You know many of the comma rules, so we will not go over them in depth. You know that commas come before items in a series: She put on Chap Stick, sun screen, and a visor before heading to the beach. You also know that a comma comes before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence: She likes him, and he likes her.

4 Comma Rules (notes) 1. Use commas to set apart opening words. Example: Of course, she kept her favorite pen with her notebook. 2. Use commas to surround information that interrupts a sentence. Example: Her favorite pen, the blue one with yellow stripes, was a gift from Mrs. Patterson.

5 Comma Rules (notes) 3. Use commas to surround which information. Example: Harriet returned to her room, which was on the third floor, after finishing dinner.

6 Semicolon 1. Use a semicolon to tie together simple sentences. Example: She likes him; he likes her. 2. Use a semicolon to clear up a confusing series. Example: The party included Jo, who poured the tea; her mother, Marmee; John Brooke, the tutor; Laurie; Meg, who baked the cookies; and the other March girls.

7 Colon (notes) 1. Use a colon to introduce a list. Example: Peter and Edmund changed back into their school uniforms: jackets, pants, ties, and caps. 2. Use a colon to explain or expand on a statement. Example: The children found themselves back where their adventure began: on a bench in a railroad station, surrounded by luggage.

8 Parentheses (notes) 1. Use parentheses to make a detour in your writing. The detour can be its own sentence. Example: Encyclopedia Brown’s dad was the chief of police in Idaville. (He was Chief Brown’s secret weapon.) Or make the detour within your sentence. Example: Leroy’s nickname was Encyclopedia (he had a head full of facts).

9 Dash (notes) 1. Just like a colon, one dash can emphasize information in your writing. Example: It was what Dorothy dreaded most—a cyclone. 2. Just like parentheses, two dashes can show a detour in your writing. Example: The house whirled around two or three times—Dorothy wasn’t sure how many—then rose in the air like a balloon.

10 Apostrophes (notes) 1. Apostrophes signify a contraction—the joining of two words. Example: couldn’t = could + not. 2. Apostrophes show possession. If the word showing possession is singular, add an apostrophe and an –s. Examples: Opal’s and Otis’s. If the word is plural and ends in an –s, just add an apostrophe. Example: The animals’ cages stood empty. If the word is plural and doesn’t end in an –s, add an apostrophe and an –s. Example: The children’s arms wrapped around Winn-Dixie.


Download ppt "Is punctuation necessary? Read the following sentence: Cora said John is acting silly. Add some punctuation and the sentence means something entirely different:"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google