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1 Media Advocacy to Change Public Policy Communities Putting Prevention to Work Washington, DC June 3, 2010 Danny McGoldrick Vince Willmore Campaign for.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Media Advocacy to Change Public Policy Communities Putting Prevention to Work Washington, DC June 3, 2010 Danny McGoldrick Vince Willmore Campaign for."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Media Advocacy to Change Public Policy Communities Putting Prevention to Work Washington, DC June 3, 2010 Danny McGoldrick Vince Willmore Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids Erika Viltz Save the Children

2 2 Integrated Advocacy Campaigns ADVOCACY: Direct efforts to pass public policies that reduce tobacco use (educating policy makers, etc.) MEDIA ADVOCACY/COMMUNICATIONS: Conduct media campaigns to support policy change, keep tobacco issue visible to public and framed as a serious public problem, and expose the tobacco industry. -- Earned Media -- Paid Media (Advertising, etc.) RESEARCH: Serve as the information resource to drive advocacy and communications efforts COALITIONS & GRASSROOTS: Mobilize organizations and individuals to join the fight

3 3 Science + Communications + Advocacy + Coalition building = Policy Action, Environmental Change and Behavior Change

4 Goals of Media Advocacy A steady drumbeat to: Keep our issue in the news and framed as a serious public health problem that requires action Provide communications support for specific policy campaigns at the local, state, federal and international levels

5 The Drumbeat Constantly publicize the problem and solutions – new data, personal stories, etc. Be a resource for media – proactive and reactive Track and expose tobacco industry’s harmful actions – marketing, targeting of children and women, products, deception, etc. Track and publicize new research on your issue Conduct and promote your own special reports and events Always relate to your policy goals

6 Keys to Success Establish self as trusted resource for the press Develop relationships with reporters, ed boards, etc. so you can be proactive Provide accurate and up-to-date information Localize everything Act quickly, opportunistically and strategically Coordinate with other campaign elements – paid media, policy maker contact, grassroots, etc. Use research-based messages and materials Stay on message; when you think you can’t possibly repeat the same message one more time – you’re just starting; someone is hearing it for the first time Always relate to your policy goal Coordinate with partners

7 Plan Ahead…

8 Always Ask Who is the target? What do we want them to do as a result of the communication?

9 Earned Media Tactics include: Press releases and statements Press events Op-eds and letters to the editor Ed Board Memos Video news releases TV and radio media tours Serving as a resource to the media

10 10 Expose the Problem Numbers Tell; Stories Sell

11 11 “I am grateful to be here today and to be able to say unequivocally that the debate is over. The science is clear: secondhand smoke is not a mere annoyance, but a serious health hazard that causes premature death and disease in children and nonsmoking adults.” – Surgeon General Richard Carmona, June 27, 2006

12 12 Letter to the editor from a restaurant worker

13 Cancer patient a rallying point for foes of casino smoking February 3, 2007 SOMERS POINT, N.J. - Driving to work one morning, Vince Rennich had no time to react as an oncoming van slammed head- on into his own vehicle, leaving him bleeding and dazed in the gutter. It was the luckiest day of his life, insists the veteran Atlantic City casino worker, who knows a thing or two about luck. For it was at the hospital where he was taken for treatment for injuries from the accident that doctors discovered something far more deadly: spots on his right lung. "If it weren't for that accident, I would probably be dead now," he said. "I had no idea I had cancer." But he has a pretty good idea how he got it. Rennich blames the secondhand smoke he had to breathe during his 25 years as a table games supervisor at the Tropicana Casino and Resort for causing his illness. He has become a rallying point for those who want to see smoking eliminated in New Jersey's 11 casinos, and who oppose a compromise proposal that would set aside 25 percent of each casino's floor for smokers. The city had been set to enact a total ban on smoking in casinos, but relented under pressure from the casino industry. At a meeting last month at which the compromise received initial approval, scores of casino workers wore bright orange shirts in support of Rennich and a total smoking ban. "It's an emotionally charged issue," said Rennich, who will turn 49 next month. "The vast majority of us feel like we've been sold out." Regina Carlson, executive director of the New Jersey Group Against Smoking Pollution, said Rennich has become one of the human faces of the casino smoking debate. "He's a forceful person, one of the most visibly suffering," she said. "His is a particularly dramatic story; he's one of the biggest victims of all.”

14 Human stories put a face on the program and the toll of tobacco

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16 16 BE A RESOURCE FOR MEDIA

17 Ed Board Memos Win-Win-Win! Raising Cigarette Taxes is Good Fiscal Policy, Good Public Health Policy, and Good Politics – It’s a Win-Win-Win Solution for Georgia’s Fiscal Challenges

18 EDITORIAL There's still time to pass cigarette tax increase 5 April 2007 Indianapolis Star “The combination of a higher cigarette tax and a low-income insurance plan is a win-win for Hoosiers' health. Legislators shouldn't leave town without it. “ EDITORIAL Win, win Tobacco tax hike: Too good not to come true 27 March 2004 Daily Press (Virginia) “It doesn't get much better than this: a recent report confirming that one specific tax -- a 50-cent-per-pack hike in the state cigarette tax -- would be a good thing for the state's coffers, its citizens, its workers, its businesses and its public health.” Costly cigarettes seen as win, win 9 February 2007 The Oregonian “An independent health economist, Jeffrey Fellows of the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, said he thinks the state's projections of how much smoking would decrease and how much tax revenues would increase are sound. "Increasing taxes on cigarettes is one of the most effective ways of reducing smoking rates," he said.” Proposed fee on cigarettes wins two ways 5 February 2005 Stevens Point Journal (Wisconsin) “As far as we're concerned, the extra buck a pack is a win-win proposition. It means more money to treat smoking-related illnesses and more money to promote smoking cessation. It means fewer kids who'll start smoking. Sounds like a bargain.“

19 Resource for Media -- Fact Sheets

20 Editorial: The Tobacco Tax The benefits of a proposed increase go way beyond funding children's health insurance. Wednesday, October 17, 2007; A16 TOBACCO USE is the No. 1 cause of preventable death in the United States, killing more than 400,000 Americans each year. Half of all long-term smokers will die early from a disease caused by tobacco. One answer to this scourge is imposing higher taxes: According to one recent report, increasing tobacco taxes has "proven highly effective in reducing tobacco use." For every 10 percent increase in tobacco prices, the number of adult smokers drops by 1.5 percent and overall consumption drops 2 percent. Young smokers are much more responsive to price increases than adults, so higher tobacco taxes are particularly effective in preventing youths from moving beyond experimentation to habitual smoking. Pregnant women are similarly affected; a 10 percent price increase produces a 5 to 7 percent reduction in smoking.... The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids estimates that the 61-cents-a pack increase would result in a 9.2 percent decline in youth smoking. Some 1.9 million children alive today would not become smokers, and 1.2 million adult smokers would quit. The administration argues that because tobacco taxes are effective in reducing smoking, the increase would not produce enough to fund SCHIP after the first five years. That's true -- but it's an argument for the tax, not against it.

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22 22 Exposing the Tobacco Industry

23 The Wall Street Journal July 16, 2001

24 “Did you hear the one about the company that emphasized how efficiently its product kills its customers?” --Dan Rather CBS Evening News July 17, 2001

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27 Editorial: Big Tobacco, Lawless as Ever Profiting by manipulating addictions that kill The Washington Post September 2, 2006 Today's editorial Strike back against tobacco tactics The Indianapolis Star (IN) Our position: Indiana legislators should increase the cigarette tax as way to fight against rising nicotine levels. Editorial: A killer of a business Tobacco companies have gradually increased nicotine levels The Tennessean Published: Tuesday, 09/05/06 The Courier-Journal (Louisville, KY) Sunday, September 3, 2006 Editorial: Addicted to addiction Editorial: More nicotine for your money St. Louis Post-Dispatch (MO) Friday, Sept. 1, 2006 September 3, 2006 Florida Today (Melbourne, FL) Our view: Florida should fight tobacco addiction Florida should fight tobacco addiction with more education for youth The New York Times Editorial: Raising Nicotine Doses, on the Sly Published: August 31, 2006

28 industry ads directed at kids have no effect on youth smoking Youth with more exposure to parent targeted ads had: Lower perceived harm of smoking More positive perceptions about smoking Stronger intentions to start smoking in the future Were more likely to have smoked in the past month

29 PRESS RELEASES EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE CONTACT:Joel Spivak 4 PM Eastern Time, October 31, 2006 New Study Finds Tobacco Industry “Prevention” Ads Don’t Work and Encourage Kids to Smoke Industry Should Pull Ads and States Should Fund Real Tobacco Prevention Statement of William V. Corr Executive Director, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids WASHINGTON, DC – A new study published online today by the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) finds that the tobacco industry’s television ads purporting to discourage youth smoking are ineffective at best and that the industry’s ads targeted at parents actually encourage kids to smoke. Following a federal judge’s ruling in August that the tobacco companies have lied – and continue to lie – about the health risks of their products and their marketing to children, this study is another reminder that the tobacco companies have not changed and continue to mislead the public at every turn. These ads are clearly intended to clean up the industry’s image, not to reduce youth smoking. This rigorous and carefully controlled study finds that the industry’s “prevention” ads targeted at youth are ineffective and do not change smoking outcomes, while industry ads targeted at parents increase the likelihood that kids will smoke. Among 10th and 12th graders, higher exposure to the parent-targeted ads was associated with lower perceived harm of smoking, stronger approval of smoking, stronger intentions to smoke in the future, and a greater likelihood of having smoked in the past 30 days. EMBARGOED OFR RELEASE CONTACT: NAME 4 PM Eastern Time, October 31, 2006 PHONE NUMBER New Study Finds Tobacco Industry “Prevention” Ads Actually Encourage Kids to Smoke STATE Health Advocates Call on Industry to Pull Ads, Urge State Leaders to Fund Real Tobacco Prevention Programs A new study published online today by the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) finds that so-called “tobacco prevention” television ads sponsored by the tobacco companies are at best ineffective and that some of the ads actually encourage kids to smoke. The study finds that the industry ads targeted at youth do not reduce smoking while industry ads targeted at parents have harmful effects on kids. Specifically, 10th and 12th graders exposed to the industry’s parent-targeted ads were more likely to approve of smoking, more likely to say they planned to smoke in the future, and more likely to have smoked in the past 30 days. STATE health advocates called on the tobacco companies to immediately stop their phony tobacco prevention programs, and they called on STATE leaders to continue funding/increase funding for real tobacco prevention programs. “This study shows that the tobacco companies’ so-called prevention ads are a fraud. These blatant attempts to reform their image are in fact

30 Manufacturers' anti-smoking ads ineffective-study By Maggie Fox – October 31, 2006 WASHINGTON, Oct 31 (Reuters) - Television ads that tobacco companies say are designed to discourage teenagers from smoking do no such thing, and some may actually encourage youths to smoke, researchers reported on Tuesday. Their study of more than 100,000 U.S. teenagers show the ads may do more harm than good, the researchers wrote in the American Journal of Public Health. “This study provides more proof that the tobacco industry is all smoke and mirrors,” said M. Cass Wheeler, Chief Executive Officer of the American Heart Association. “The tobacco industry is addicted to lying and in truth wants our kids to become addicted to tobacco. If they were serious about reducing smoking rates, they would stop spending $15 billion a year to promote their deadly products.” Study snuffs tobacco company's claims By Greg Bolt – December 16, 2006 A study by an Oregon State University researcher and his colleagues suggests that anti-smoking ads paid for by the tobacco industry and targeted at youth and their parents not only don't work but might actually encourage teens to smoke. Brian Flay, a professor in OSU's department of public health, was one of nine researchers who studied tobacco industry ads aimed at preventing youth smoking and said that at best they don't have any effect. And he said some, particularly those aimed at parents, had the opposite effect. “It actually encourages it, especially when kids see those ads targeted to parents," Flay said. "If they see those, there's a 12 percent increase in the likelihood they'll become smokers.” That's a conclusion that is strongly contested by cigarette maker Philip Morris USA, which says it not only has spent $1 billion to develop and disseminate effective advertising aimed at deterring youth smoking but also has research that shows that it works. It says the ads are based on widely accepted research and don't carry any hidden messages. "There's nothing in our research that raises the concerns Smoke And Mirrors By Matthew Kirdahy – November 1, 2006 Those annoying television commercials that told parents to talk to their teenagers about not smoking were especially annoying to the kids they were meant to help, an upcoming article in the American Journal of Public Health will claim--so annoying that they may have encouraged kids to take up the habit that the tobacco-company- sponsored spots were supposed to deter. While the authors of the article do not go as far as saying the ads were purposely designed to encourage smoking, they do claim there was no benefit to them. The article was the work of a team of nine doctors, including specialists in psychology, sociology and economics, who studied the influence on teenagers of anti-smoking ads paid for by Altria unit Philip Morris and Carolina Group's Lorillard Tobacco. The research was funded by the National Cancer Institute, the national Institute on Drug Abuse and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which focuses on health issues; all of those groups have an obvious ax to grind with cigarette makers. Philip Morris and Lorillard did not return phone calls Tuesday afternoon seeking comment. The report was released ahead of its publication by the American Cancer Society. "We must make sure the tobacco industry isn't drafting our health care

31 When Don’t Smoke Means Do Editorial – November 27, 2006 Philip Morris has adopted the role of good citizen these days. Its Web site brims with information on the dangers of smoking, and it has mounted a campaign of television spots that urge parents, oh so earnestly, to warn their children against smoking. That follows an earlier $100 million campaign warning young people to “Think. Don’t Smoke,” analogous to the “just say no” admonitions against drugs. All this seems to fly against the economic interests of the company, which presumably depends on a continuing crop of new smokers to replace those who drop out or die from their habit. But in practice, it turns out, these industry-run campaigns are notably ineffective and possibly even a sham. New research shows that the ads aimed at youths had no discernible effect in discouraging smoking and that the ads currently aimed at parents may be counterproductive. (…) Philip Morris says it has spent more than $1 billion on its youth smoking prevention programs since 1998 and that it devised its current advertising campaign on the advice of experts who deem parental influence extremely important. But the company has done only the skimpiest research on how the campaign is working. It cites June 2006 data indicating that 37 percent of parents with children age 10 to 17 were both aware of its ads and spoke to their children about not smoking. How the children reacted has not been explored. And somehow the company forgot to tell the parents, as role models, to stop smoking themselves. Philip Morris, the industry’s biggest and most influential company, is renowned for its marketing savvy. If it really wanted to prevent youth smoking — and cut off new recruits to its death-dealing products — it could surely mount a more effective campaign to do so.

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35 35 Study: Camel No. 9 cigarette ads appeal to teen girls March 15, 2010 A recent marketing campaign for Camel cigarettes appears to have attracted the interest of teen girls, a study shows. The ads for Camel No. 9 cigarettes — which ran in magazines such as Vogue,Cosmopolitan and Glamour — were a hit with girls ages 12 to 16, says a study of 1,036 adolescents published online Monday in Pediatrics. Camel Cigarette Ads Score Big with Teen Girls March 15, 2010 Study: Ads for Camel No. 9 were aimed at teenage girls March 17, 2010 Getting Teenage Girls to Smoke? March 15, 2010

36 36 TRACK AND PUBLICIZE NEW RESEARCH

37 EVIDENCE

38 50 State Specific Releases FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jennifer Friedman January 26, 2005 / Joel Spivak Maine Can Keep 19,870 Kids from Smoking and Save 6,350 from Early Death By Fully Funding Tobacco Prevention, New Research Shows Maine Will Also Save $238.4 million in Health Care Bills WASHINGTON, DC (January 26, 2005) – Maine will prevent 19,870 kids alive today from starting to smoke and save 6,350 of them from a premature, smoking-caused death if it continues to fund a tobacco prevention and cessation program at levels recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), according to new research data released today by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Maine will also save $238.4 million in long-term, smoking-related health care costs as a result of these reductions in youth smoking. Nationally, if every state increased funding for tobacco prevention programs to CDC minimum levels, they would prevent nearly two million kids from starting to smoke, save 624,650 of these kids from premature death, and save $23.4 billion in health care costs, according to the new data. The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids’ analysis is based on a new study published in the February 2005 issue of the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) that found “clear evidence” of a direct relationship between the FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jennifer Friedman / January 26, 2005 Joel Spivak Oregon Can Keep 25,750 Kids from Smoking and Save 8,240 from Early Death By Fully Funding Tobacco Prevention, New Research Shows Oregon Would Also Save $309 million in Health Care Bills WASHINGTON, DC (January 26, 2005) – Oregon would prevent 25,750 kids alive today from starting to smoke and save 8,240 of them from a premature, smoking-caused death if it funded a tobacco prevention and cessation program at minimum levels recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), according to new research data released today by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Oregon would also save $309 million in long-term, smoking-related health care costs as a result of these reductions in youth smoking. Nationally, if every state increased funding for tobacco prevention programs to CDC minimum levels, they would prevent nearly two million kids from starting to smoke, save 624,650 of these kids from premature death, and save $23.4 billion in health care costs, according to the new data. The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids’ analysis is based on a new study published in the February 2005 issue of the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) that found “clear evidence” of a direct relationship FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jennifer Friedman / January 26, 2005 Joel Spivak Indiana Can Keep 55,870 Kids from Smoking and Save 17,880 from Early Death By Fully Funding Tobacco Prevention, New Research Shows Indiana Would Also Save $670.5 million in Health Care Bills WASHINGTON, DC (January 26, 2005) – Indiana would prevent 55,870 kids alive today from starting to smoke and save 17,880 of them from a premature, smoking-caused death if it funded a tobacco prevention and cessation program at minimum levels recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), according to new research data released today by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Indiana would also save $670.5 million in long-term, smoking-related health care costs as a result of these reductions in youth smoking. Nationally, if every state increased funding for tobacco prevention programs to CDC minimum levels, they would prevent nearly two million kids from starting to smoke, save 624,650 of these kids from premature death, and save $23.4 billion in health care costs, according to the new data. The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids’ analysis is based on a new study published in the February 2005 issue of the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) that found “clear evidence” of a direct relationship FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jennifer Friedman / January 26, 2005 Joel Spivak Delaware Can Keep 14,540 Kids from Smoking and Save 4,650 from Early Death By Fully Funding Tobacco Prevention, New Research Shows Delaware Would Also Save $174.5 million in Health Care Bills WASHINGTON, DC (January 26, 2005) – Delaware will prevent 14,540 kids alive today from starting to smoke and save 4,650 of them from a premature, smoking-caused death if it continues to fund a tobacco prevention and cessation program at levels recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), according to new research data released today by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. Delaware would also save $174.5 million in long-term, smoking-related health care costs as a result of these reductions in youth smoking. Nationally, if every state increased funding for tobacco prevention programs to CDC minimum levels, they would prevent nearly two million kids from starting to smoke, save 624,650 of these kids from premature death, and save $23.4 billion in health care costs, according to the new data. The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids’ analysis is based on a new study published in the February 2005 issue of the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH) that found “clear evidence” of a direct relationship between the

39 Study: Anti-smoking efforts will save thousands (Augusta, ME) Report: More money spent, more lives saved (Northwest Indiana) Invest for long-term payback Report Says Tobacco Prevention Programs Save Lives, Money (DE) February 15, 2005 January 27, 2005 January 28,2005 PRESS COVERAGE

40 40 PROMOTE YOUR OWN SPECIAL REPORTS AND EVENTS

41 Conduct polls to show public support for tobacco control policy Release the poll publicly and actively pitch to the press Weave polling into other public communications Using Polling: Earned Media

42 42 Total Favor: 79% Total Oppose: 18% Darker shading equals stronger intensity New Hampshire Survey of registered voters – January 2006 New Hampshire Voters Favor A Statewide Smoke-Free Workplace Law Would you favor or oppose a state law in New Hampshire that would prohibit smoking in all indoor workplaces, including offices, restaurants and bars?

43 Poll finds majority favors N.H. smoking ban in restaurants, bars March 6, 2006 CONCORD, N.H. -- A majority of New Hampshire residents believe workers should be protected from secondhand smoke and support a ban on smoking in all workplaces, including restaurants and bars, according to a survey released Monday. The University of New Hampshire Survey Center poll of 402 registered voters between Jan. 20 and Jan. 26 was conducted for Clean Air Works, a coalition of health groups in favor of a smoking ban. It has an error margin of plus or minus 4.9 percentage points. A House committee last month endorsed a bill prohibiting smoking in all restaurants and cocktail lounges in the state; a full House vote is scheduled for Thursday. The poll said New Hampshire residents support a workplace smoking ban by a margin of more than four to one. It reported 79 percent favored a ban; 18 percent did not. Eighty-eight percent of Democrats and 72 percent of Republicans polled supported a ban; 80 percent of undeclared voters also supported a smoking ban, the survey said. A strong majority of people polled percent -- said they were concerned about the health effects of secondhand smoke. Eighty-seven percent said workers should be protected from secondhand smoke. Of smokers polled, 58 percent said they believed the right of people to breathe clean air in restaurants and bars outweighed their right to smoke in those places. More than 20 media hits on the poll in the weeks before the vote

44 Advertising

45 45 Merit of workplace smoking ban is a health consideration Tuesday, March 7, 2006 (Editorial) New Hampshire's motto, "Live free or die," does not apply to smokers — at least not the first option of the motto. A proposed ban on smoking in the workplace is scheduled for a vote in the House of Representatives Thursday. If lawmakers follow the results of a poll conducted by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center late last month, it will pass easily. The survey was conducted among 402 registered voters and 79 percent of them were in favor of the ban. Eighteen percent did not favor it, leaving only 3 percent undecided or with no opinion. It is an understatement to say the ban is supported by a majority of the people surveyed. It is a strong sentiment. How will the House react to public sentiment when it votes Thursday? A House committee endorsed a ban when it voted last month. In the wake of the usually reliable Survey Center's poll, it will be a real stretch for lawmakers to overturn the committee's report. A ban on smoking in the workplace has steadily gained strength. The state's hospitality industry, in this case generally restaurants, lounges and bars, has opposed similar legislation on smoking in the past, but this year the association representing many in the industry has taken a hands-off approach — leaving its members to make their choices without being pressured.

46 Just One Vote...

47 47 Restaurant smoking ban on its way Governor next stop after House passage By LAUREN R. DORGAN – June 1, 2007 By the fall, smoking will be banished from all of New Hampshire's bars and restaurants. With an overwhelming vote of , the House approved a restaurant smoking ban yesterday. The Senate has already approved the bill, and Gov. John Lynch has said he will sign it. The only question now is when, exactly, the bill will hit his desk; it will take effect 90 days after it is signed. Proponents of the ban described it as crucial to workplace safety for wait staff, saying it would shield them from the health risks of second-hand smoke. They also cited a University of New Hampshire poll that showed 79 percent of the state's residents support such a ban. "Employees should not be forced to sign away their health to earn a living," said Rep. Tara Reardon, a Concord Democrat. "This bill is not anti-smoker. It is anti- smoke." Opponents said that market forces do the job: Diners choose where to eat and servers where to work, they argued. Most restaurants have gone smoke-free on their own, they said. "Smokers are the only minority I know of that society throws out into the cold," said Rep. Kenneth Weyler, a Kingston Republican....

48 Voter Support for the Smoke-Free Workplace Law New York City Survey of registered voters - March 2004 New York Yankees New York Knicks David Letterman Coney Island Hot Dog A deli cornbeef sandwich Krispy Kreme donuts Donald Trump George Steinbrenner 75% of New Yorkers Support The City’s Smoke-Free Law The Law is Even More Popular Than a Variety of New York Institutions Favorable Rating

49 March 28, 2004 Smoke ban a hit - even outpolls Yanks Lisa L. Colangelo New York Daily News What do New Yorkers like more than the Yankees or a Coney Island hot dog? The smoking ban. Or at least that's the conclusion of a poll of 500 registered voters for the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. According to the poll, 61% of people strongly support the ban on smoking in workplaces, including bars, restaurants and offices. That's up from 55% in a similar poll conducted in August. Another 14% said they "somewhat" support the ban. "Those are amazing numbers," said Josh Isay, a spokesman for the campaign. "People should know that contrary to some press reports, this law is very popular... it's a vocal minority that opposes the law." By comparison, 46% of respondents reported a "very favorable" view of the New York Yankees, and 39% were big fans of Coney Island hot dogs. And 70% of people said the rights of customers to be in a smoke-free restaurant or bar is more important than the right to smoke. Bob Zuckerman of the New York Nightlife Association questioned the validity of the results. "When you group bars and restaurants together, you get a much different result than if you just ask about bars," he said. "We continue to hear from members and even nonmembers that the smoking ban has hurt business and curtailed the bar business." About 80% of the women surveyed support the ban while only 19% opposed it. Meanwhile, 70% of men supported the ban and 29% opposed it. The poll had a margin of error of 4.5%.

50 The SidePak records the levels of respirable suspended particles in the air that contribute to particle pollution Using Air Quality Monitoring

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53 53 CASE STUDY TOBACCO TAXES

54 54 Case Study – Tobacco Tax Campaigns The Science Developing the Message Delivering the Message in Integrated Media and Policy Advocacy Campaigns Measuring Success: Media Coverage, Message Impact and Policy Impact

55 55 Source: Tax Burden on Tobacco, 2010, and author’s calculations

56 56 Total Favor: 67% Total Oppose: 31% Would you FAVOR or OPPOSE a one dollar per pack increase in the state tobacco tax, with part of the revenue dedicated to a program to reduce tobacco use, particularly among kids, and the rest dedicated to addressing the state budget deficit? Developing the Message: Voters Strongly Favor Tobacco Tax Increases Darker shading equals stronger intensity Total numbers are rounded International Communications Research Survey January 2010

57 57 Developing The Message Polling: Including A Youth Smoking Prevention Component Increases Support For Tobacco Tax Hikes Substantially The Exact Wording Of The Question Makes Little Difference … as part of an effort to help reduce smoking, particularly among kids (darker shading=stronger intensity) 18% strong …if part of the money is used to fund programs to reduce tobacco use, particularly among kids 58% strong 55% strong 18% strong 41% strong 27% strong Would you favor or oppose an increase in the state tobacco tax? Robert Wood Johnson Foundation National survey of registered Voters - June 2002 The Mellman Group/Market Strategies

58 58 Polling: Most Convincing Reasons To Support Tobacco Tax Increase % very convincing reasons to support tobacco tax increase (top tier) Even slight decrease in youth smoking makes tax worthwhile – 3 fewer kid smokers = 1 fewer death Everyday, 5K kids try first cigarette & 2K become smokers Whole society wins if fewer kids begin smoking Whole society wins if kids quit smoking According to ACS & other health groups, everyday, 5K kids try first cigarette and 2K become smokers Health care costs caused by smoking = $75 billion/ year – increasing taxes will save $ in long run Health care costs caused by smoking = $3.50/pack of cigarettes – increasing taxes will save $ in long run ACS/AHA/ALA support higher taxes b/c it keeps kids from smoking -- big tobacco opposes tax for same reason Scientific evidence proves increasing taxes reduces smoking – 10% price incr = 7% red in youth smoking Whole society wins if kids smoke fewer cigarettes Robert Wood Johnson Foundation National survey of registered Voters - June 2002 The Mellman Group/Market Strategies Virtually all of the top arguments focus on kids and reducing youth smoking

59 Total numbers are rounded Darker shading indicates stronger intensity Increasing The Tobacco Tax Is The Preferred Way To Address State Budget Deficits As you may have heard, virtually all states are currently facing severe budget deficits. I am going to read you a list of proposals that have been suggested as a way to address the state budget deficit. After I read each one, please tell me if you FAVOR or OPPOSE that proposal. Reduce funding for education Increase the state gasoline tax Increase the state tobacco tax Oppose Favor 60% 17% 22% 74% International Communications Research Survey January 2010 Reduce funding for health care programs Increase the state income tax 20%76% 19%80% 81% 38% Increase the state sales tax 72% 25% Reduce funding for Medicaid services Reduce funding for road maintenance and construction Reduce funding for state law enforcement 81% 70% 78% 16% 26% 20%

60 Lessons from Policy Campaigns What Do Policy Makers Want? A new and reliable source of revenue Support of the voters A way to talk about raising the tax

61 61 Message Platform WIN, WIN, WIN The Theme for Legislative Campaigns A WIN for public health: prevents kids from smoking and saves lives A WIN for the state budget: raises revenue to balance budgets and fund vital programs A WIN for politicians: it’s popular with voters

62 62 Delivering the Message in Media And Policy Campaigns Earned media – press releases, editorials, etc. Paid media – Advertising & direct mail State-Specific Polls Direct contact with legislators – testimony, meetings and mobilizing the public to take action

63 63 New Research Generates Media Coverage

64 64 Evidence

65 65 Print Coverage USA Today - April 24, 2001New York Times - May 1, 2001

66 66 Special Reports

67 67 National Tax Report Generate media attention Remind policy makers: Increasing the tobacco tax is a win-win-win Get state-specific information in front of key policy makers

68 68 Tax Report on the Web

69 69 Tax Report: State-Specific Web Page

70 70 Widget

71 71 National Press Release

72 72 State Press Releases

73 73 U.S. would reap billions from $1 cigarette tax hike February 11, 2010 By Maggie Fox WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Adding a $1 per pack tax to cigarettes could raise more than $9 billion a year for states, health advocates said on Wednesday, and a poll released with the study shows Americans would support such a tax. The poll, conducted by International Communications Research, found 60 percent of voters would support the tax to help struggling states and would prefer it over other tax increases or budget cuts. "An increase in tobacco tax rates is not only sound public health policy but a smart and predictable way to help boost the economy and generate long-term health savings for states facing deepening budget deficits," said John Seffrin, chief executive of the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network. "We have irrefutable evidence that raising the tobacco tax lowers smoking rates among adults and deters millions of children from picking up their first cigarette," Seffrin said in a statement. The report was released by the Cancer Action Network, the advocacy arm of the American Cancer Society, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, American Heart Association, American Lung Association and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. All these non-profit groups have long supported taxing tobacco more as a way to discourage smoking....

74 74 Report: $1 cigarette tax increase would raise $209.4M in S.C. February 10, 2010 Raising South Carolina’s cigarette tax by $1 would bring in $209.4 million in new annual revenue, helping close the states budget shortfall while also reducing smoking, according to a national report released today by a coalition of public health organizations. South Carolina’s tax is currently the lowest in the nation, at seven cents per pack. The report comes as states grapple with budget shortfalls and face cuts to education, health care and other essential public services. The report details the revenue and health benefits a $1 cigarette tax increase would give to each state. According to the report, a $1 cigarette tax increase in South Carolina would also: Prevent 46,700 children from becoming smokers. Spur 25,700 current adult smokers to quit. Save 21,700 residents from premature, smoking-related deaths. Save $1 billion in health care costs....

75 75 Targeted Online Advertising Advertising in selected target states. Ads placed on search engines, local political/policy blogs, Facebook and local newspapers. When visitors search for key words or read stories on those topics, they see an ad or sponsored search result leading to the tax report. Result: Daily web traffic increased by nearly one-third.

76 76 Online toolkit for advocates Media Materials Advocacy Materials Grassroots Materials Research Materials

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78 The federal tax last year jumped 62 cents a pack to $1.01. "Raising the cigarette tax to 57 cents a pack puts us at an economic disadvantage," Rep. Gary Simrill, R- Rock Hill, said Wednesday. But other legislators, including Reps. Joe Jefferson of Pineville and Anne Peterson Hutto of Charleston, both Democrats, listed several benefits: A higher tax could deter teens from starting to smoke and prompt others to quit, saving them from future heart attacks and cancer and saving the state money in medical bills for lower-income residents. The tax increase is projected to raise $136 million, which would sit in a savings account until July At that time, $125 million would go to pay Medicaid costs, $5 million to the Hollings Cancer Center at the Medical University of South Carolina and $5 million toward helping people quit smoking and also keep them from starting. If there was money left, $1 million would be used to market South Carolina-grown crops. The state could use the money for Medicaid to draw down a 3-to-1 match from the federal government, bringing in a total of $375 million. Polls have shown that a majority of registered South Carolina voters favor a cigarette tax increase, according to the South Carolina Tobacco Collaborative. The group is made up of public health organizations across the state that have fought to increase the tax since Research by Frank Chaloupka, an economics professor at the University of Illinois, developed in conjunction with the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids and the South Carolina Tobacco Collaborative, found that money from a cigarette tax is predictable, steady and reliable. The cash flow will lessen over the years as people break the habit but, according to Chaloupka, the decline is "modest, predictable and more than offset by the related reductions in public- and private-sector health care and other economic costs caused by smoking." Senate overrides veto, raises cigarette tax by 50 cents a pack May 13, 2010 COLUMBIA -- South Carolina lawmakers have overridden Gov. Mark Sanford’s veto and raised what was the nation's lowest cigarette tax by 50 cents a pack. Today’s vote by the Senate raises the 7 cent tax to 57 cents a pack on July 1 and leaves Missouri with the nation's lowest tax at 17 cents. The vote in the Senate followed a vote in the House on Wednesday after the Republican Sanford had said he wouldn't allow a tax increase on cigarettes unless it was offset by some other tax decrease. The measure raises nearly $125 million to cover the loss of federal bailout cash next year in Medicaid programs for the elderly, disabled and poor. It also is expected to generate $5 million each for cancer research and efforts to curb smoking and $1 million for agriculture marketing. The years-long tug-of-war over raising the state's 7-cent cigarette tax for the first time in more than 30 years came down to a final vote in the Senate. Joe Dabit (left) sells cigarettes to Eric Chamness and William Haden on Wednesday at Charlie's Grocery on the corner of Jasper and Radcliffe streets In Charleston. The Senate today voted to override Gov. Mark Sanford's veto of the cigarette tax increase. The House voted to override the veto Wednesday over the objections of lawmakers from counties along the North Carolina and Georgia borders who argued that the higher tax rate would hurt the competitiveness of convenience stores. The state tax in North Carolina is 45 cents. It is 37 cents in Georgia. South Carolina's cigarette tax had not been increased since The national average state tax is $1.41 a pack. Research by Frank Chaloupka, an economics professor at the University of Illinois, developed in conjunction with the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids and the South Carolina Tobacco Collaborative, found that money from a cigarette tax is predictable, steady and reliable. The cash flow will lessen over the years as people break the habit but, according to Chaloupka, the decline is "modest, predictable and more than offset by the related reductions in public- and private- sector health care and other economic costs caused by smoking." Polls have shown that a majority of registered South Carolina voters favor a cigarette tax increase, according to the South Carolina Tobacco Collaborative.

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80 80 Serving as Information Resource for Media and Policy Makers

81 81 Generating Newspaper Editorials Win-Win-Win! Raising Cigarette Taxes is Good Fiscal Policy, Good Public Health Policy, and Good Politics – It’s a Win-Win-Win Solution for Georgia’s Fiscal Challenges

82 82 Factsheets

83 83 Factsheets

84 84 Our staff provide expert testimony to legislative committees about the need for tobacco control policies

85 85 Using Advertising to Educate Legislators

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87 87 Media Coverage of Ads Campaign pushes for higher NM tobacco tax Associated Press - February 23, :05 AM ET ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - A national campaign focused on keeping tobacco products out of children's hands is running a series of newspaper advertisements around New Mexico to encourage state lawmakers to consider increasing the tax on cigarettes. The New Mexico Legislature adjourned Thursday without a plan on how to finance public schools and state government in the coming year. They are scheduled to return Wednesday for a special session. Legislative leaders have been trying to negotiate a deal to plug the budget deficit with revenues from gross receipts, income and cigarette taxes. The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids is running ads that favor a $1 increase in the tobacco tax in a handful of New Mexico newspapers this week. The campaign claims the increase could raise nearly $36 million and keep kids from smoking. Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed

88 88

89 89

90 90 Using polling to generate media coverage and demonstrate public support

91 91 Total Favor: 69% Total Oppose: 30% Would you FAVOR or OPPOSE a one dollar per pack increase in the state tobacco tax as part of an effort to reduce tobacco use, particularly among kids, with the new revenue used to reduce the state budget shortfall? Kansas Voters Favor A One Dollar Increase in the State Tobacco Tax Darker shading equals stronger intensity Total numbers are rounded Kansas Statewide Tobacco Tax Study March 2010

92 92 Total numbers are rounded Kansas: Support for a One Dollar Tobacco Tax Increase Remains Strong Across Party Lines Kansas Statewide Tobacco Tax Study March 2010 Would you FAVOR or OPPOSE a one dollar per pack increase in the state tobacco tax as part of an effort to reduce tobacco use, particularly among kids, with the new revenue used to reduce the state budget shortfall?

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94 94 Survey: 69% back cig tax hike Bipartisan support indicated for increase to avoid deeper budget cuts March 23, 2010 Two-thirds of Kansans support a $1 per pack increase in the state cigarette tax to generate new revenue to address the state's budget deficit, a new survey said Tuesday. The telephone survey of 500 likely Kansas voters indicated bipartisan support — 69 percent overall — for a tobacco tax hike rather than deeper cuts to education, transportation and social services. Among 13 budget-balancing ideas presented in the survey, the only options gaining broad support were increases in taxes on tobacco and liquor. "Kansans understand the difficult choices our leaders face as they deal with the state's budget woes," said Chris Masoner, spokesman for the American Cancer Society in Kansas. "We know that many legislators are reluctant to support any tax increase." The current Kansas tax on cigarettes is 79 cents a pack. In January, Democratic Gov. Mark Parkinson proposed a tax of $1.34 on a pack to reflect the national average. Rhode Island has the nation's highest cigarette tax at $3.46 per pack, while the lowest is 7 cents in South Carolina....

95 95 Grassroots and Coalition Building

96 96 Grassroots Materials: Microsites

97 97 Grassroots Alert

98 98 Clerics back Md. tobacco tax increase; Coalition supports $1.50- per-pack rise aimed at teen- agers; `Nobody should smoke'; Denominations' decision termed `a breakthrough' July 14, 1998 A coalition of religious leaders representing Baptists, Methodists, Lutherans and others lent their support yesterday to an initiative that aims to curb teen smoking by raising the Maryland state tax on cigarettes $1.50 a pack. The broad-based support of the members of the Central Maryland Ecumenical Council for the Maryland Children's Initiative is considered significant because, while individual religious denominations may have discouraged smoking among their members, they have not been in the forefront of the legal and political anti-smoking movement. The initiative was endorsed at a news conference yesterday at the council's North Baltimore offices by the local Lutheran and United Methodist bishops, and representatives of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance, Clergy United for the Renewal of East Baltimore, the United Missionary Baptist Convention, the American Baptist Churches of the South and the Presbyterian Church (USA). "It is a groundbreaking step," said United Methodist Bishop Felton Edwin May of the Baltimore-Washington Conference, which passed a resolution at its annual meeting last month endorsing the initiative. "It shows cohesiveness and collaboration at a level that would move this issue ahead. None of us as individuals or as denominations can do it alone." Building Coalitions – Faith Community The broad-based support of the members of the Central Maryland Ecumenical Council for the Maryland Children's Initiative is considered significant because, while individual religious denominations may have discouraged smoking among their members, they have not been in the forefront of the legal and political anti- smoking movement.

99 99 Impact

100 100 EDITORIAL There's still time to pass cigarette tax increase 5 April 2007 Indianapolis Star “The combination of a higher cigarette tax and a low-income insurance plan is a win-win for Hoosiers' health. Legislators shouldn't leave town without it. “ EDITORIAL Win, win Tobacco tax hike: Too good not to come true 27 March 2004 Daily Press (Virginia) “It doesn't get much better than this: a recent report confirming that one specific tax -- a 50-cent-per-pack hike in the state cigarette tax -- would be a good thing for the state's coffers, its citizens, its workers, its businesses and its public health.” Costly cigarettes seen as win, win 9 February 2007 The Oregonian “An independent health economist, Jeffrey Fellows of the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, said he thinks the state's projections of how much smoking would decrease and how much tax revenues would increase are sound. "Increasing taxes on cigarettes is one of the most effective ways of reducing smoking rates," he said.” Proposed fee on cigarettes wins two ways 5 February 2005 Stevens Point Journal (Wisconsin) “As far as we're concerned, the extra buck a pack is a win-win proposition. It means more money to treat smoking-related illnesses and more money to promote smoking cessation. It means fewer kids who'll start smoking. Sounds like a bargain.“

101 101 Governor Mitch Daniels (R-IN): “ We have it in our power to make a huge difference. We know how to reduce smoking, and in particular to dissuade young people from starting to smoke. It starts with a higher price for the product.. ” [Excerpts from Governor Daniels ’ State of the State Speech delivered January 16, 2007, as provided by the Governor ’ s office] Governor Tim Pawlenty (R-MN): “ This [cigarette tax increase] will not only increase revenues...but it will also decrease smoking, it will improve health, and not be a drag, or discouragement, to future job growth and investment in our state. ” [Press Conference by Governor Pawlenty and Republican legislators, 2005] Governor John Lynch (D-NH): Governor Lynch has proposed a cigarette tax increase to fund the state ’ s budget and reduce youth smoking, stating in his budget address that raising the cigarette tax would not only raise $87 million over two years but “ also allows us to accomplish an important public health goal - deterring young people from smoking. ” [The Concord Monitor, February 16, 2007] Political Leaders Echo The Message

102 102 Success 47 states, Washington DC, and Puerto Rico have increased their cigarette tax more than 100 times since January 1, states, Washington, DC, and the federal government increased tobacco taxes in states have increased tobacco taxes so far in 2010

103 103 federal rate ($1.01) + current state average ($1.42): $2.43 per pack 2008 federal rate (39¢) + state average ($1.19) $1.58 per pack May federal rate (34¢) + state average (43¢): 77¢ per pack Federal Cigarette Excise Tax + Average State Cigarette Tax

104 Total Projected Health Benefits from State & Federal Cigarette Tax Increases since January 2008 * Federal + State Average Cigarette Tax Rate at the beginning of 2008: $1.46 per pack Federal + State Average Cigarette Tax Rate by July 2010: $2.43 per pack Fewer Future Youth Smokers2,809,800 Fewer Adult Smokers1,464,100 Future Smoking Deaths Avoided1,282,700 * States included: AR, CT, DC (2008 & 2009), DE, FL, HI (2008, 2009, 2010), KY, MA, MD, MS, NH (2008, 2009), NJ, NM, NY, NC, PA, RI, SC, UT, VT (2008 & 2009), WA, WI (2008 & 2009).

105 Total Projected Health Care Savings from State & Federal Cigarette Tax Increases since January 2008 * * Long-term savings accrue over lifetimes of persons who stop smoking or never start because of tax increase. 5-Year Heart & Stroke Savings$712 million 5-Year Smoking-Births Savings$578 million Overall Long-Term Health Savings*$63 billion We estimate that the states that increased their cigarette taxes during this period have collected or will collect a total of more than $4.2 billion in new cigarette tax revenue in just the first year after the increase was/is effective. Does not include revenue from the federal increase. Federal + State Average Cigarette Tax Rate at the beginning of 2008: $1.46 per pack Federal + State Average Cigarette Tax Rate by July 2010: $2.43 per pack * States included: AR, CT, DC (2008 & 2009), DE, FL, HI (2008, 2009, 2010), KY, MA, MD, MS, NH (2008, 2009), NJ, NM, NY, NC, PA, RI, SC, UT, VT (2008 & 2009), WA, WI (2008 & 2009).

106 Look Familiar?

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108 108 Campaign for Healthy Kids CampaignforHealthyKids.org Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Tax (Soda Tax) Polls Statements Media Monitoring Spokesperson Communications Materials Social networking Childhood Obesity Tactics in Action

109 109 Polls

110 110 Statements

111 111 Media Monitoring

112 112 Spokesperson

113 113 Communications Materials/ Research

114 ???? Tobaccofreekids.org


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