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“Making Your University Work For You” Shavon Carey & Cherelle Pinckney.

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Presentation on theme: "“Making Your University Work For You” Shavon Carey & Cherelle Pinckney."— Presentation transcript:

1 “Making Your University Work For You” Shavon Carey & Cherelle Pinckney

2 Learning Objectives - USC 101 The Career Intervention for freshmen is designed to help them choose a major by exposing them to other co- curricular activities that can assist in their professional development.

3 Learning Objectives - USC 401 The Career Intervention for seniors is to show them how to market the experiences that they have gained in their co-curricular activities on their resumes for the job search.

4 Activity How many of you changed your major your: A.freshmen year B.sophomore year How many of you knew what you wanted to do after graduation by the beginning of your senior year: A.continuing education B.workforce Did you participate in co-curricular activities during your undergraduate studies: A.yes B.no What did you gain from your co-curricular experiences?

5 Co-Curricular Activities Co-curricular activities can be defined as “experiences and activities outside of the classroom that are directly related to your career development--develop leadership, time management, teamwork, interpersonal communication,and other skills employers value when making hiring choices.” (Streufert, 2013) “Engagement with non-academic pursuits is not only beneficial to student development, but is known to be highly valued by employers. It may seem like a small change, but by demonstrating to students that we view these activities as equally important to academic study, we encourage participation.” (Andrews, 2013)

6 The COMPLEAT Model

7 USC 101 Circle 1: Self-discovery. The need for self-understanding occurs when clients do not have a clear identity and have not considered or explored the types of self-information that can help clarify their self-concept. Circle 2: Roles. Presenting issues is the need for information about the world outside the self. Circle 5: Information Processing and Decision Making. Clients need to process information and insight as they obtain it; hence, most of the client movement in the Model involves moving in and out of the Central Circle. In fact, a client may present with a decision making issue and this may not be the focus of the intervention.

8 Self-Discovery Confirming your major and career goals. Similar to when buying a car, you test drive it. Or if you purchase new clothes, you often try them on before making a purchase. Similarly, internships and co- curricular experiences provide an opportunity for you to test reality and assess the fit of various activities or tasks. Ultimately, this minimizes the risk that you will be dissatisfied with your career after graduation. Research has shown that the majority of college students, especially freshmen and sophomores, often lack the knowledge and experience required to make a planned decision concerning their choice of major and career direction (Kelly & White, 1993; Tillar & Hutchins, 1979). Many college students have not been exposed to a large variety of career options before choosing an academic major or a career direction. They simply choose from majors and/or careers that they are most familiar with. They frequently do not understand that an academic major is a proxy for an occupation or career path. They have not learned that such choices such as academic majors have clear connections to the subsequent career options available to them. For decades observers have indicated that the majority of college students, especially freshmen and sophomores, do not possess adequate levels of the self-understanding or career awareness needed to make educated career decisions (Moore, 1976; Rayman, 199 3)

9 Roles Client Exploration and Discovery. Inspired by Super’s Life-Span, Life-Space Theory, “this Circle captures content on life role issues and the world of work. Life role issues might include learning about leisure roles, cultural roles, community involvement, partner roles, spirituality, dual work/career roles, parenting, or other roles outside of the occupational structure” (DeBell, 2002). “Crystallizing an occupational preference requires people to clarify the type of work they would enjoy. The process of crystallization builds upon the occupational and self-information acquired during the growth stage. Using this information, people focus on acquiring more in-depth occupational information to explore the degree to which specific occupations may allow for self- concept implementation. Thus, accurate self-understanding is essential for identifying appropriate occupational preferences” (Niles & Harris-Bowlsbey, 2013).

10 USC 401 Circle 4: Transitions. This Circle represents clients that are already established in multiple life roles. Clients distress may also be due to factors over which the client has little control... Circle 5: Information Processing and Decision Making. Clients need to process information and insight as they obtain it; hence, most of the client movement in the Model involves moving in and out of the Central Circle. In fact, a client may present with a decision making issue and this may not be the focus of the intervention. Circle 3: Implementation. This Circle represents the action part of the definition of counseling, that is, helping clients take actions that fit prior decisions.These actions might include any activity in which clients need to engage to facilitate their development and/or decisions about self and life roles.

11 Implementation Job Hunting. Clients need to take action that correspond with decisions that they have previously made. “These actions might include an activity in which students need to engage to facilitate their development and/or decisions about self and life roles”(DeBell, 2002). Problems occur for clients in Circle 3 when the actions (i.e., attempts to implement decisions) are not met with success, and it is the lack of success that typically brings these clients to counseling. According to Lent and Brown, career development problems occur when individuals “prematurely foreclose on occupational options due to inaccurate self-efficacy beliefs, outcome expectations, or both, and when individuals forego further consideration of occupational options due to barriers they perceive as insurmountable” (Niles & Harris-Bowlsbey, 2013).

12 Transitions Adjustments. “There is some overlap between the Transitions Circle and Circles 1 and 2 because clients adjustment may require another look at preferences and life roles” (DeBell, 2002). Persons recycling through the exploration stage use exploratory behavior to resolve a wide variety of career issues like starting over in a new occupation or becoming more innovative in their current positions (Niles & Harris-Bowlsbey, 2013). Individuals experiencing maladjustment to transitions “may also need greater self-awareness, knowledge of life roles, or decision-making and implementation skills” (DeBell, 2002).

13 Information Processing & Decision Making Decision Making. “Clients need to process information and insight as they obtain it” (DeBell, 2002). Movement in and out of this circle is fluid as clients struggle to interpret information that they receive and explore new opportunities. Personal and environmental factors influence decisions and they can be perceived as barriers or opportunities. Barriers and opportunities are described as contextual issues in the COMPLEAT Model and are roughly divided into personal, interpersonal, and environmental contextual issues. Personal contextual issues affect the ability to decide based upon belief systems, personality, and other things related to mental health. Interpersonal contextual issues relate to family attitudes, values, and support. Environmental contextual issues are things that the client has little control over such as the economy and societal stereotypes.

14 Questions

15 References Andrews, M. (2013, January 22). Why our students need co-curricular, not extra-curricular, activities. Retrieved from development-university-curriculum-design DeBell, C. (2002). Practice for a paradigm shift: A complete model for an integrative course. The Counseling Psychologist, 30(6), Retrieved from html Niles, S., & Harris-Bowlsbey, J. (2013). Career development interventions in the 21st century. (4th ed., pp ). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc. Orndorff, R., & Herr, E. (2011). A comparative study of declared and undeclared college students on career uncertainty and involvement in career development activities. Journal of Counseling and Development, 74(6), Retrieved from tb02303.x/pdf Streufert, B. (2013, October 14). [Web log message]. Retrieved from


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