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Collective Intelligence and Collective Leadership Summit for the Future May 4, 2006 - Amsterdam George Pór Chairman, CommunityIntelligence Ltd.

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Presentation on theme: "Collective Intelligence and Collective Leadership Summit for the Future May 4, 2006 - Amsterdam George Pór Chairman, CommunityIntelligence Ltd."— Presentation transcript:

1 Collective Intelligence and Collective Leadership Summit for the Future May 4, Amsterdam George Pór Chairman, CommunityIntelligence Ltd.

2 “The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them.” (Einstein) The increasing complexity of our interwoven global crises can be met only by dramatically enhancing the collective intelligence of human groups at all scale, from local to global. Collective Intelligence: Why Now As of today, “Collective intelligence” has 978,000 webpages referring to it. 6 years ago there was only about 10,000. Why now? What has been fueling the mega-growth of this concept?

3 Collective intelligence is the capacity of groups and organizations to evolve towards higher order complexity and integration through collaboration and innovation. -- George Pór Collective intelligence is at its roots a human enterprise in which mind- sets, a willingness to share, and an openness to the value of distributed intelligence for the common good are paramount. -- from Wikipedia, the world’s largest encyclopedia that is a product of massively collective intelligence Collective Intelligence: Three Complementary Definitions “Intelligence” refers to the main cognitive powers: perception, action planning and coordination, memory, imagination and hypothesis generation, inquisitiveness and learning abilities. The expression “collective intelligence” designates the cognitive powers of a group. -- Pierre Lévy, Canadian Research Chair of Collective Intelligence

4 a. Dialogic CI – A group of participants suspend their old mental models and engage in dialogue that values the emergent whole higher than its parts. This approach include Bohmian dialogue, "generative conversation" (Otto Scharmer) and "enlightened communications" (Andrew Cohen). b. Co-evolutionary CI – This form of CI builds on the power of such evolutionary mechanisms generating intelligence over time as trial and error, differentiation and integration, competition and collaboration, etc. Its examples include: ecosystems, sciences, and cultures. c. Flow-based CI – A group of people become so absorbed in a shared activity that they experience being completely at one with it and one another. Ensembles, high-performance sport teams, astronauts, and others in that state of communion, report on both an enhanced state of autonomy, and collective intelligence. d. Statistical CI - Individuals thinking separately in large crowds can reach successful conclusion about their collective cognitive, coordination or predictive challenges. Examples include the "intelligence" of markets and cases popularized in the "Wisdom of Crowds" by James Surowiecki. e. Human-machine CI – This form of CI leverages the synergy of the human mind and its electronic extensions, drawing on the best capacities of both. The "collective" includes symbiotic networks of humans and computers working together and developing compound capabilities. It can also support all other forms of CI. There are many forms, manifestation of CI, and correspondingly, many "tribes" of its practitioners. This is an abbreviated overview. A more detailed inventory by Tom Atlee can be found here: Forms of Collective Intelligence

5 What Is the Value of CI, Personally to You? Do you want to reach your highest personal & professional potential? If so, the problem is that you can’t even have a clue of what your full potential may be, without considering the cognitive and creative powers of your global professional community, as part of yours. CI and its embodiment, our global brain, are as much part of you as you are part of them. How, specifically?

6 CI in Wilber’s 4 Quadrants

7 The Business Case for “CI 2.0”: What Is the Value of Boosting CI You need to upgrade your organisation’s collective intelligence if and when it needs to: Increase the chance for breakthrough discoveries and innovation to occur with some level of consistency. Find solutions to tough challenges faster, by mobilising dispersed expertise and talent. Have successful methods and practices in one part of the company spread rapidly to all teams and units where they can make a difference. Increase the size of the web of expertise available to any employee to solve specific problems or make complex decisions.

8 Higher Collective IQ Results from a More Vibrant Knowledge Ecosystem Boosting your group’s/organization’s collective intelligence, its capacity to evolve, requires to feed and be fed by its knowledge ecosystem. A “knowledge ecosystem” is a value-creating, self-organizing system, defined as a triple network comprised of: a People network of co-creative conversations that creates a Knowledge network of shared insights, inspirations, successful practices and frameworks both of which is supported by a Technology network of tools, and virtual environments.

9 To Upgrade Your CI, You Need to Feed Your Knowledge Ecology Source: John Seely Brown

10 The CI of Organizations Is Emerging from a Network of Conversations

11 Humans Co-Evolving with Language and Tools

12 Individuals Co-Evolving with Communities and Organisations

13 What Makes the Engine Roar

14 6-pole Model of CI Source: Dr. Pierre Lévy Canadian Research Chair of Collective Intelligence University of Ottawa

15 Source: Tom Atlee Partnership-based Model of Collective Intelligence

16 Communities of Practice Communities of practice are self-organizing and self-governing groups of people who share a passion for the common domain of what they do and strive to become better practioners. They create value for their members and stakeholders through developing and spreading new knowledge, productive capabilities and fostering innovation. Communities of practice are self-organizing and self-governing groups of people who share a passion for the common domain of what they do and strive to become better practioners. They create value for their members and stakeholders through developing and spreading new knowledge, productive capabilities and fostering innovation.

17 What Makes a Community of Practice? Community Personal motivation Trustful relationships Easy ways to stay connected Mutuality of service Practice Sharing expertise Creating shared resources, e.g.: shared knowledge base Validating best practices Growing collective capabilities Distinctive Focus Community identity Unique mission Shared cultural values Jointly developed learning agenda Support Structure Community facilitation Online forums Dynamic document repositories Project weblogs Instant messaging & whiteboards

18 Communities of Practice Are Everywhere Source William S. Snyder

19 Face-to-Face & Virtual Communities Through Dialogue & Reflection Through Dialogue & Reflection

20 Harvesting is the first act of building collective memory and intelligence. Recording what has heart for the members of the group is a vital condition for coherent, coordinated action in the future. Taking care of harvesting is a high-value, though frequently under- honored task of community stewardship. Harvesting, Knowledge Weaving and Meaning-Making Knowledge weaving is identifying the patterns in conversations and making connections that add to its richness. Well-edited and structured meeting summaries are a good example. Software tools for weaving include idea and outline processors, taxonomies, keyword searching, topic maps, mind maps, link collections etc. Meaning making is the higher order integration of information and knowledge into enhanced CI, through iterative conversations that make up the nervous system of an organization and help it evolve from a community of learners to a community that learns. Tools for meaning-making include metaphors, (digital) storytelling, and mental modeling 

21 A system has “collective leadership” when people are attuned to each other so well that, even when separate, they naturally act in harmony with each other and the goals of the common enterprise. Most leadership teams, including those at senior levels, are far from fulfilling their potential. They meet as individuals, squeezing time from their more urgent work, debating from their individual perspectives and concentrating on their individual domains of authority. Their actions, and the actions of those who report to them, consequently take place at cross- purposes, and they often seem trapped in cycles of opposition and breakdown. Need for Collective leadership Source: Dialogos

22 Presencing also known as “Theory U” is the result of 8 years of research and interviews with 150 thought leaders on innovation and leadership, by Otto Scharmer, a professor at MIT. The U-process - a methodology for individual and collective leadership to unlock our creativity and achieve breakthrough results. It teaches us how to learn from the future. The next few slides will illustrate some of the core distinctions of Presencing. Presencing as Collective Leadership Technology Source: Presence: Human Purpose and the Field of the Future, by Senge, Scharmer, Jaworski, Flowers Professor Scharmer teaching

23 Source: Otto Scharmer 4 Levels of Listening

24 Source: Otto Scharmer, THEORY U: Leading Profound Innovation and Change By Presencing Emerging Futures, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, May 2004 Sensing - Presencing - Realizing: Three Movements of Theory U

25 “Presencing” is bringing into presence, and into the present, your highest potential and the future that is seeking to emerge. Your highest future possibility is related to your own highest intention…it’s being an instrument of life itself, to accomplish, in a sense, what life wishes for me to accomplish. Source: Presence: Human Purpose and the Field of the Future, by Otto Scharmer Presencing Your Future

26 Journeying on U Curve by Generative Journaling “Generative journaling” is like a having a generative conversation with oneself, and gaining new insights by answering a set of generative questions. It is also a personal preparation for the collective practices of co-sensing, co-presencing and co- creating.

27 The council is assembled by a leading executive and usually consists of 5 to 12 people who participate in dialogue and debate about vital issues and decisions facing the organization. Each council member has the ability to participate not from the egoistic need to win a point or protect a parochial interest. Council members come from a range of perspectives, but each member has deep knowledge about some aspect of the organization and/or the environment in which it operates. The council includes key members of the management team but is not limited to members of the management team, nor is every executive automatically a member. The council meets periodically, as much as once a week or as infrequently as once per quarter. Source: Good to Great, by Jim Collins Leadership Councils in “Good-to-Great” Companies

28 Last Words… If you want to learn more about collective intelligence, I recommend: Blog of Collective Intelligence intelligence.com/blogs/public/ intelligence.com/blogs/public/ Quest for Collective Intelligence, by George Pór Liberating the Innovation Value of Communities of Practice, by George Pór intelligence.com/resources.htm Collective Intelligence: Mankind's Emerging World in Cyberspace, by Pierre Lévy Co-Intelligence Institute Thank you for your listening and questions that inspired what I had to share with you!

29 George Pór Chairman, CommunityIntelligence Ltd. George is a veteran of building effective processes and systems for large-scale, professional collaboration networks, who combines European values with American dynamism and ancient wisdom traditions. He has worked as Senior Research Fellow at INSEAD and Visiting Researcher in the Complexity Programme of the London School of Economics. Other academic work included posts at Université de Paris, UC Berkeley, and California Institute of Integral Studies. He is the author of “The Quest for Collective Intelligence,” a chapter in Community Building: Renewing Sprit and Learning in Business. He wrote also the “Liberating the Innovation Value of Communities of Practice” chapter of the “Knowledge Economics: Principles, Practices and Policies” book economics.htm, as well as the Collective Intelligence section in Evolutionary Leadership, by Peter Merry. His clients include: EDS, European Foundation for Management Development, European Investment Bank, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Siemens, and Swiss Re. He can be reached at the following address: George at Community-Intelligence dot com George Pór Chairman, CommunityIntelligence Ltd. George is a veteran of building effective processes and systems for large-scale, professional collaboration networks, who combines European values with American dynamism and ancient wisdom traditions. He has worked as Senior Research Fellow at INSEAD and Visiting Researcher in the Complexity Programme of the London School of Economics. Other academic work included posts at Université de Paris, UC Berkeley, and California Institute of Integral Studies. He is the author of “The Quest for Collective Intelligence,” a chapter in Community Building: Renewing Sprit and Learning in Business. He wrote also the “Liberating the Innovation Value of Communities of Practice” chapter of the “Knowledge Economics: Principles, Practices and Policies” book economics.htm, as well as the Collective Intelligence section in Evolutionary Leadership, by Peter Merry. His clients include: EDS, European Foundation for Management Development, European Investment Bank, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, Siemens, and Swiss Re. He can be reached at the following address: George at Community-Intelligence dot com Your learning partner…


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