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Www.toastmasters.org Leading in the Moment Generational Leadership, Big Projects, Planning, & Small Tasks when leaders are ready for them J. Randy Penn.

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Presentation on theme: "Www.toastmasters.org Leading in the Moment Generational Leadership, Big Projects, Planning, & Small Tasks when leaders are ready for them J. Randy Penn."— Presentation transcript:

1 Leading in the Moment Generational Leadership, Big Projects, Planning, & Small Tasks when leaders are ready for them J. Randy Penn DTM For District 21 TLI – January 19, 2013

2 Key Learning “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” – Mark Twain

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4 Why are we here?  The Toastmasters Leadership Program  Dr Ralph Smedley’s Vision  Competent, Advanced Distinguished Leadership  Regular, Detailed, Sequential  Generational Differences  Traditionals  Baby Boomer  Gen X  Gen Y/ Millennials  What we can do about it  It’s tougher to lead diverse groups  Especially tougher on leaders

5 Dr Ralph Smedley’s Vision  YMCA Santa Ana, CA 1924 Director Education  Observed that young patrons needed: job skills, specifically “training in the art of public speaking and in presiding over meetings”  Decided the training format would be a social club

6 Toastmasters Education System

7 Toastmasters Leadership Program Competent Leadership (CL) Advanced Leader Bronze (ALB) Advanced Leader Silver (ALS) Distinguished Toastmaster (DTM) Manual 10 projects club meeting roles CC, Club Officer, TLI, 2 presentations ALB, District Officer, HPL, Club Starter ALS & ACG

8 Toastmasters Leadership Program Competent Leadership (CL) Advanced Leader Bronze (ALB) Advanced Leader Silver (ALS) Distinguished Toastmaster (DTM) Meeting Leadership Club Leadership District Leadership 3%

9 4 Generations in Toastmasters Traditionalsborn before yoa Baby boomers1946 and yoa – Work is an anchor in their lives. Gen X1965 and yoa – More concerned about work-life balance. Millennials/GenY born after yoa – Often have different priorities. Rely on technology, can work at anytime/anyplace. Believe they should be evaluated on work produced — not on how, when, where or why they got it done.

10 Who are the they? Views TowardBoomers Gen Xers Millennials 1 Level of trust Confident of self, not authority Low toward authority High toward authority 2 Loyalty to institutions Cynical Considered naïve Committed 3 Most admireTaking charge Creating enterprise Following a hero of integrity 4 Career goalsBuild a stellar career Build a portable career Build parallel careers 5 RewardsTitle and corner office Freedom not to do Meaningful work 6 Parent-child involvement Receding Distant Intruding

11 Who are the they? continued Views TowardBoomers Gen Xers Millennials 7 Having children Controlled Doubtful Definite 8 Family lifeIndulged as children Alienated as children Protected as children 9 EducationFreedom of Expression Pragmatic Structure of accountability 10 EvaluationOnce a year with documentation “Sorry, but how am I doing?” Feedback when I want it 11 Political orientation Attack oppression Apathetic, individual Crave community 12 The big question What does it mean? Does it work? How do we build it?

12 Attitudes about work FactorBaby BoomersGeneration XersMillennials AttitudeOptimisticSkepticalRealistic OverviewThey believe in possibilities, and often idealistically strive to make a positive difference in the world. They are also competitive and seek ways to change the system to get ahead. The most misunderstood generation, they are very resourceful and independent and do not depend on others to help them out. They appreciate diversity, prefer to collaborate instead of being ordered, and are very pragmatic when solving problems. Work habitsThey have an optimistic outlook. They are hard workers who want personal gratification from the work they do. They believe in self- improvement and growth. They are aware of diversity and think globally. They want to balance work with other parts of life. They tend to be informal. They rely on themselves. They are practical in their approach to work. They want to have fun at work. They like to work with the latest technology. They have an optimistic outlook. They are self- assured and achievement focused. They believe in strong morals and serving the community. They are aware of diversity.

13 How do we recruit & train (Boomers) Begin the Toastmasters Year—July 1 District Officers Conference Chair TLI Chair Club Officer Club Meeting roles—2 to 6 weeks in advance CC Speech Manual—sequential learning CL Manual—complicated matrix Advanced Leadership—No manuals, projects

14 Oscar the Grouch [singing] Let this be the Grouch's cause! Point out everybody's flaws! Something is wrong with everything, except the way I sing!

15 How do you lead Millennials? Flexibility They want to work with friends Respect Fun & Sense of Humor Variety of tasks, experiences, mentors Mentor

16 Examples of Managing Mellinnials Provide engaging experiences that develop transferable skills. By making them more employable, we actually increase the odds that they will stay. Provide a rationale for the work you’ve asked them to do and the value it adds. Provide variety. Grow teams and networks with great care … develop the tools and processes to support faster response and more innovative solutions.

17 Examples of Managing Mellinnials Explicitly reward extra effort and excellence of results. Pay close attention to helping them navigate work and family issues. Demonstrate a willingness and availability to talk through their perceived problems, i.e., just listen. Lead like a web site. They’ll tell what they want. Identify, Research or Buy It Now! Waiting for Your Cat to Bark?: Persuading Customers When They Ignore Marketing by Bryan Eisenberg, Jeffrey Eisenberg and Lisa T. Davis

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19 Communicating with Millennials Positive Respectful Motivational Electronic Text, , PPT, YouTube Lead like a web site. They’ll tell what they want. Identify, Research or Buy It Now! In person, if the message is really important. Timely.

20 Recruiting & Training Millennials Make it Fun Engage them interactively & engaging Keep up the pace Reward skill development Real Content Begin with Orientation, not skills training Assess what they know Continually reinvent your training Communicate where to turn for answers Don’t just train the what, train the why

21 Key Lessons Flexible Leadership recruiting & style – Ask for roles, describe tasks, provide info – Be prepared to split roles & negotiate everything Help everyone get comfortable Be sure the training has real substance Use learning styles for generational differences

22 Key Lessons Millennials read more Millennials are highly interactive learners Popularity & productivity of role- playing & interactive activities are in inverse to age Millennials will make the Xers look like technological dinosaurs Boomers, GenX & Millennials will stay where they are valued, recognized, appreciated, & supported

23 Leaders are Compassionate – Everyone is different Optimistic – Expect the best – Turn Lemons into Margaritas! Credible – Know your business – Choose projects carefully Confident – Trainers, leaders, thinkers Creative – Imagineers vs Managers Glad – No one wants to work with Oscar-the-Grouch or the Pointy-Haired Boss – It’s all about Attitude!

24 Final thoughts It’s Their Toastmasters, not your Toastmasters It’s going to feel like Leadership is taking more of your time More communication Text, , PPT, YouTube, Calls, Mentoring Job splitting, recruit tasks, describe goals Treat information & tasks like a web site Identify, Research, Buy it Now! Assistant Area & Division Governors

25 Leading in the Moment Generational Leadership, Big Projects, Planning, & Small Tasks when leaders are ready for them J Randy Penn DTM Follow me on Facebook, Twitter or Skype Bibliography Waiting for Your Cat to Bark?: Persuading Customers When They Ignore Marketing by Bryan Eisenberg, Jeffrey Eisenberg and Lisa T. Davis (Jun 13, 2006) Decoding Generational Differences: Fact, fiction... or should we just get back to work? W. Stanton Smith Principal National Director, Next Generation Initiatives Talent Deloitte LLP 2008 Do Generational Differences Matter In Instructional Design?* Professor Thomas C. Reeves Department of Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology (EPIT) 2008 *The literature review upon which this paper is based was originally funded by the U.S. Department of Labor and UPS in Generational differences in the workplace, Anick Tolbize, Research and Training Center on Community Living, August 16, 2008


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