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Department of Mathematics and Science Properties of Matter Keisha Kidd, Curriculum Support Specialist Mary Tweedy, Curriculum Support Specialist Millard.

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Presentation on theme: "Department of Mathematics and Science Properties of Matter Keisha Kidd, Curriculum Support Specialist Mary Tweedy, Curriculum Support Specialist Millard."— Presentation transcript:

1 Department of Mathematics and Science Properties of Matter Keisha Kidd, Curriculum Support Specialist Mary Tweedy, Curriculum Support Specialist Millard Lightburn, District Supervisor Department of Mathematics and Science Office of Academics and Transformation Big Idea 8 SC.4.P.8.1. SC.4.P.8.2, SC.4.P.8.3 Pacing Guide – Quarter 1 Topic 4 09/16-09/27

2 Benchmark Descriptions SC.4.P.8.1 – Measure and compare objects and materials based on their physical properties including: mass, shape, volume, color, hardness, texture, odor, taste, and attraction to magnets. SC.4.P.8.2 – Identify properties and common uses of water in each of its states.

3 What is matter? Matter is everything around you, including you! Matter is what all things are made of.

4 Solids A solid has its own shape. A solid does not change unless you cut, bend, or break it. Solids take up space and have mass.

5 Liquids Liquids do not have their own shape. Liquids take the shape of their container. Liquids take up space and have mass.

6 Gases Gases have no definite size or shape. Gases take the shape of its container. A gas will fill all the space inside a container. Gases take up space and have mass.

7 Water is matter. Did you know it comes in all 3 forms? A Solid A Liquid A Gas ice water vapor water

8 Matter has certain properties. Matter can have color. Matter can be different sizes. Matter can have different shapes. Matter can have texture. Matter can be rigid or bendable. Matter also takes up space and has mass. Properties are the characteristics of matter, how something looks or feels.

9 SolidLiquidGas

10 SolidLiquidGas Has definite shape Particles are close together and slow moving Has volume 4kids.com/files/m atter_solid.html

11 SolidLiquidGas Has a definite shape Takes on shape of container Particles are close together and slow moving Particles are farther apart and faster-moving Has volume 4kids.com/files/ matter_liquid.ht ml

12 SolidLiquidGas Has a definite shape Takes on shape of container Does not have definite shape Particles are close together and move slowly Particles are farther apart and faster moving Particles are farthest apart and move rapidly Has volume Expands to take up whatever space is available 4kids.com/files/ matter_gas.html

13 States of Matter Demonstration s_of_matter/index.html s_of_matter/index.html es.html es.html nges.html nges.html

14 Review Questions 1. What are the 3 forms of matter? Solids, Liquids and Gases 2. A solid has a definite shape. True or False True 3. A liquid has a definite shape. True or False False. A liquid has a definite size, but it takes the shape of its container. 4. A gas has a definite shape. True or False False. A gas has no definite size or shape, because it fills all the space of its container. 5. What are some properties of matter? color, size, shape, texture, odor, attraction to magnets, mass, hardness, taste, and volume

15 Department of Mathematics and Science Physical Properties of Matter Qualitative vs. Quantitative

16 Qualitative Five Senses Sight - Looks Touch - Feels Hearing – Sounds when moving… Odor – Smells Tastes

17 How can we group these objects?

18 One property is color. Color Red Green Yellow

19 Size Large objects Small objects A second property is size.

20 Circles Squares Triangles A third property is shape. Shape

21 We can group objects if they are rigid or bendable. Bendable means that the matter can bend, curve, or turn. Rigid means that the matter cannot bend, it is stiff. Can you name something that is rigid and something that is bendable?

22 Which objects are rigid? Which objects are bendable?

23 These objects are rigid. These objects are bendable.

24 Quantitative Measurement Tools Ruler Tape measure Balance Spring Scale Graduated cylinder Thermometer

25 Quantitative Mass Grams are units used to measure volume of a liquid. Balance Pan Balance Triple Beam Balance Gram Pieces Centimeter Cubes

26 Quantitative Volume Milliliter or Liter are units used to measure volume of a liquid. Beakers Graduated Beakers Measuring Spoons Graduated Cylinders Measuring Cups

27 Quantitative Temperature Degrees (°F) Fahrenheit is a unit used to measure temperature. Degrees (°C) Celsius is a unit used to measure temperature. Thermometer

28 Quantitative Weight Ounces, pounds are units used to measure weight of an object. Spring Scale Personal Scale Single Pan Scale

29 Quantitative Length or Distance Meter, centimeter are units used to measure the distance an object travels. Stopwatch (timing device) Meter Stick Tape Measure Trundle Wheel Ruler

30 Matter Jeopardy

31 Game Rules Games Rules Qualitative: Sink/Float? Attracted to a Magnet? Other observations that will help identify this matter (use your five senses). Quantitative: Mass? Volume? Linear Measure? Select an object from the tray. List the both qualitative and quantitative properties (begin with the most obvious properties). Use your five senses to identify the qualitative properties. Use the appropriate measurement tools to discover quantitative properties. Give descriptions to other group as they try to guess the object based on the properties. Name of Matter?

32 Resources

33 Department of Mathematics and Science Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter SC.4.P.8.2 – Identify properties and common uses of water in each of its states. Keisha Kidd, Curriculum Support Specialist Mary Tweedy, Curriculum Support Specialist Millard Lightburn, PHD Instructional Supervisor Pacing Guide – Quarter 1 Topic 4 09/16-09/27 Department of Mathematics and Science Office of Academics and Transformation

34 Benchmark Essential Content Understand phase changes as they relate to water. Recognize the properties of water and water’s common uses. Identify the properties of water.

35 Let’s Explore! Adapted from Inquiry in Action Chapter 6

36 Department of Mathematics and Science Common Uses of Water Liquid Phase

37 Department of Mathematics and Science Common Uses of Water Solid Phase

38 Department of Mathematics and Science Common Uses of Water Gas Phase

39 Phases of Water Liquid (precipitation) Solid (ice) Gas (evaporation, condensation)

40 Department of Mathematics and Science Phase changes as they relate to water.

41 Physical change-a change in state The substance is still the same substance Form changes but chemical makeup doesn’t

42 Ice changes to water—water changes to ice, frozen water is still water

43 Water changes to steam, a gas, when it is heated to its boiling point,water vapor condenses to form a liquid

44 Changing States of Matter-Water Water freezes at 0 degrees Celsius, 32 degrees Fahrenheit Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius, 212 degrees Fahrenheit

45 Properties of Water Water is unique in that it is the only natural substance that is found in all three states -- liquid, solid (ice), and gas (steam) on Earth. Water as a liquid is sticky and elastic, and tends to clump together in drops rather than spread out in a thin film. Water as a solid (ice) is less dense than liquid water and floats on it. Water changes state when enough heat or thermal energy is added to it or removed from it. Water changing one from state to another is an example of a physical change. Water freezes at 32 o Fahrenheit (F) and 0 o on the Celsius scale. Water boils at 212 o F and 100 o on the Celsius scale.

46 Department of Mathematics and Science Big Idea 8: Properties of Matter SC.4.P.8.3 – Explore the law of conservation of mass by demonstrating that the mass of a whole object is always the same as the sum of the masses of its parts.

47 Conservation of Matter Chemical changes don’t make new matter The total mass of the products that form equals the total mass of the substances that react.

48 Department of Mathematics and Science Magnetic Forces Keisha Kidd, Curriculum Support Specialist Mary Tweedy, Curriculum Support Specialist Millard Lightburn, Instructional Supervisor Department of Mathematics and Science Office of Academics and Transformation Big Idea 8 SC.4.P.8.4 Pacing Guide – Quarter 1 Topic 4 09/30-10/13

49 Department of Mathematics and Science MAGNETIC PROPERTIES SC.4.P.8.4 – Magnetic Properties Investigate and describe that magnets can attract magnetic materials and attract and repel other magnets.

50 William Gilbert, an English physician, first proposed in 1600 that the Earth itself is a magnet, and he predicted that the Earth would be found to have magnetic poles.

51 Department of Mathematics and Science Vocabulary Attract To pull toward one another, as opposite poles of two magnets pull toward one another. Force A push or a pull. Magnetism A property of certain kinds of materials that causes them to attract iron or steel. Repel To push away, as similar poles of two magnets push away from one another. Pole Either of two opposing forces or parts, such as the poles of a magnet.

52 What is Magnetism? Magnetism is the force of attraction or repulsion of a magnetic material due to the arrangement of its atoms.

53 Magnet Basics  Magnets are objects that produce magnetic fields and attract metals like iron, nickel and cobalt.  The magnetic field's lines of force exit the magnet from its north pole and enter its south pole.  Some magnets occur in nature, they are called natural magnets.  ex. magnetite (also called lodestone) Defined by:

54 Magnetism  Magnetism is a force.  Metals stick to magnets  Magnets have different strengths  Magnets have two poles: north and south  Like Poles repel  Opposite poles attract  The force of magnetism can travel  through some objects.

55 The Earth is a magnet: Magnetic South Pole Magnetic North Pole It exerts magnetic forces and is surrounded by a magnetic field that is strongest near the North and South magnetic poles. Geographic North Pole Geographic South Pole

56 The ends of a magnet are where the magnetic effect is the strongest. These are called “poles.” Each magnet has 2 poles – 1 north, 1 south.

57 Field Lines Around a Magnet

58 Properties of Magnets  Like magnetic poles repel each other.  Unlike magnetic poles attract each other.  Not all objects are affected by the force of magnetism  ex. wood, glass, paper, plastic  Common metals affected by magnetism are iron, nickel, and cobalt

59 Let’s Explore  What happens if you put together two magnets?  Do they become stronger together?  Experiment with magnets, a variety of sizes of magnetic objects, and write observations about strengths of different combinations of magnets.

60 Magnetism Stations!

61 Exploring Magnetism Stations: An Absolutely Magnetic Experience! Station #1 Which Objects are Magnetic? Station #2 Can you Fish? Station #3 Can Magnets Float? Station #4 Can you Play Marbles? Station #5 Are all Magnets the Same? Station #6 How can you Define a Magnetic Field? Reflection: What do you know about magnetism now?

62 Magnets and Metals Investigation Science for Kids: Characteristics of Materials. Select Magnets and Metals. Essential Question: What types of metals are attracted to a magnet? Objectives: -Classify metals based on their attraction to a magnet. -Identify iron, nickel, and cobalt as magnetic materials Connected Learning Reflection

63 Gizmos

64 Review - True/False 1)Magnets are objects that produce an area of magnetic force called a magnetic field. 2)Magnets attract all types of metals. 3)Magnetism can attract magnetic objects or push them away. 4)Metals such as iron, nickel and cobalt are attracted to magnets. 5)Magnetic fields by themselves are visible to the human eye. Adapted from: 1)True 2)False 3)True 4)True 5)False

65 We use the Earth’s magnetic field to find direction. The needle of a compass always points toward the magnetic south pole. We call this direction “North” (remember, opposites attract) COMPASS

66 Lab Reflection (IAN)  What do you know about magnets now?  Do you still agree with your statement from Magnets in Water Formative Assessment Probe? Why or why not?  Is there something you are still confused about?  What do you know now about magnets that you did not know before this lab?

67 Writing in Science

68 Foldables!

69

70 Additional Resource Links Free Presentation in PowerPoint format: Magnetism: Science for Kids: Click on Characteristics of Materials. Select Magnets and Metals. Kitchen Magnet Game AIMS Gr. 4 Physical Science: Magnets and Metals


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