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Module 2: Assigning IP Addresses in a Multiple Subnet Network.

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Presentation on theme: "Module 2: Assigning IP Addresses in a Multiple Subnet Network."— Presentation transcript:

1 Module 2: Assigning IP Addresses in a Multiple Subnet Network

2 Overview Assigning IP Addresses Creating a Subnet Using IP Routing Tables Overcoming Limitations of the IP Addressing Scheme

3 Lesson: Assigning IP Addresses The Components of an IP Address What Are the Classes of IP Addresses? How Dotted Decimal Notation Relates to Binary Numbers How to Convert Dotted Decimal Notation to Binary Format How Subnet Masks Work Guidelines for IP Addressing

4 Multimedia: The Components of an IP Address IP Address IP Address IP Address IP Address IP Address IP Address

5 What Are the Classes of IP Addresses? Class C Small network Network IDHost ID xwyz Class B Medium network Network IDHost ID 1 0 xwyz Class A Large network Network IDHost ID 0 xwyz

6 Practice: Determining the Class of an IP Address In this practice, you will determine the class of an IP address

7 How Dotted Decimal Notation Relates to Binary Numbers Bit 7 Bit 6 Bit 5 Bit 4 Bit 3 Bit 2 Bit 1 Bit 0 8 Bit Octet Decimal Value

8 Your instructor will demonstrate how to convert an IP address from dotted decimal notation to binary format How to Convert Dotted Decimal Notation to Binary Format

9 Practice: Converting Numbers Between Decimal and Binary In this practice, you will convert dotted decimal notation to binary format and then convert the binary number to dotted decimal notation

10 Multimedia: How Subnet Masks Work Subnet masks distinguish the host ID from the network ID in an IP address by using: 1 bits to indicate the network ID 0 bits to indicate the host ID 1 bits to indicate the network ID 0 bits to indicate the host ID

11 Practice: Identifying the Components of an IP Address In this practice, you will identify the components of an IP address

12 Guidelines for IP Addressing When assigning network and host IDs: Do not use 127 for a network ID Use public registered addresses only where essential Use IANA private address range for private addresses Do not use all binary 1s for the host ID in a class-based network Do not use all binary 0s for the network ID in a class- based network Do not duplicate Host IDs Do not use 127 for a network ID Use public registered addresses only where essential Use IANA private address range for private addresses Do not use all binary 1s for the host ID in a class-based network Do not use all binary 0s for the network ID in a class- based network Do not duplicate Host IDs

13 Practice: Identifying Invalid IP Addresses In this practice, you will identify which IP addresses are invalid

14 Lesson: Creating a Subnet What Is a Subnet? How Bits Are Used in a Subnet Mask How to Calculate the Subnet Mask Defining Subnet IDs

15 What Is a Subnet? Subnet Main network Subnet Router

16 How Bits Are Used in a Subnet Mask Class B Address With Subnet Number of Subnets 254 Number of Hosts 254 Network ID Host ID 1 Subnet ID ,5348,1284,064 2,0321, ,25632,

17 Your instructor will demonstrate how to calculate the subnet mask How to Calculate the Subnet Mask

18 Defining Subnet IDs = = = = = = = = Eight networks are possible

19 Practice: Calculating a Subnet Mask In this practice, you will calculate a subnet mask for a given scenario

20 Lesson: Using IP Routing Tables What Is a Router? Using a Default Gateway The Role of Routing in the Network Infrastructure How the Computer Determines Whether an IP Address is a Local or Remote Address What Is Static and Dynamic Routing? How the IP Protocol Selects a Route How IP Uses the Routing Table Using the Routing Table in Windows Server 2003

21 What Is a Router? A A Routers B B C C D D Communication path A-B-D Communication path A-C-D

22 When you use a default gateway: Using a Default Gateway The default gateway: Routes packets to other networks Is used when the internal routing table on the host has no information on the destination subnet DHCP automatically delivers the IP address for the default gateway to the client To configure the client manually for the default gateway, use the General tab on the Network Connections Properties page The default gateway: Routes packets to other networks Is used when the internal routing table on the host has no information on the destination subnet DHCP automatically delivers the IP address for the default gateway to the client To configure the client manually for the default gateway, use the General tab on the Network Connections Properties page

23 Multimedia: The Role of Routing in the Network Infrastructure Subnet 1 Subnet 3 Subnet 2 Router A Router B

24 How the Computer Determines Whether an IP Address Is a Local or Remote Address Local and destination hosts IP addresses are each ANDed with their subnet masks 1 AND 1 = 1 Other combinations = 0 If ANDed results of source and destination hosts match, the destination is local IP address Subnet mask Result

25 Practice: Determining Whether an IP Address is a Local or Remote Address In this practice, you will determine whether a given IP address is a local or remote address

26 Dynamic routers: Static routers: What Is Static and Dynamic Routing? Do not discover the IDs of remote networks Do not exchange information with other routers Are not fault tolerant Do not discover the IDs of remote networks Do not exchange information with other routers Are not fault tolerant Discover the IDs of remote networks Exchange information with other routers Can be fault tolerant Discover the IDs of remote networks Exchange information with other routers Can be fault tolerant

27 How the IP Protocol Selects a Route IP creates packet Searches routing table for destination address Locates host address matching destination address? Transmits packet to the designated gateway Generates an error message Transmits packet to the designated gateway No Yes No Locates a default gateway address? ?? Locates network address matching destination address? ?

28 How IP Uses the Routing Table

29 Using the Routing Table in Windows Server 2003 Use the routing table to: Check the accuracy of routing information Determine the forwarding IP address View the routing table by: Typing route print at the command prompt, or Using the netstat –r command Use the routing table to: Check the accuracy of routing information Determine the forwarding IP address View the routing table by: Typing route print at the command prompt, or Using the netstat –r command

30 Practice: Viewing and Modifying a Routing Table In this practice, you will view and then modify an IP routing table

31 Lesson: Overcoming Limitations of the IP Addressing Scheme How IP Addresses Are Wasted What Are Private and Public IP Addresses? What Is VLSM? How to Use VLSM What Is Supernetting? Using CIDR to Implement Supernetting

32 Multimedia: How IP Addresses Are Wasted Limitations of the IP address scheme can cause IP addresses to be wasted Three ways to conserve IP addresses Create private networks Create supernets Use variable length subnet masks IP version 6 will resolve the limitations

33 What Are Private and Public IP Addresses? Public addresses: Private addresses: Do not have to be registered Can be assigned by the network administrator Are used on computers that are not accessed by the Internet Do not have to be registered Can be assigned by the network administrator Are used on computers that are not accessed by the Internet Are assigned by an ISP Consist of unique class-based blocks Are kept to a limited number Are assigned by an ISP Consist of unique class-based blocks Are kept to a limited number

34 What Is VLSM? For example: Using VLSM, you can: Create different sized subnets to match the number of hosts in each subnet Significantly reduce the number of unused IP addresses Create different sized subnets to match the number of hosts in each subnet Significantly reduce the number of unused IP addresses If you used a fixed length class C subnet mask ( ), you would have allocated 1778 addresses but used only 348, thereby wasting Using VLSM you can reduce the number of unused addresses to 133.

35 Your instructor will demonstrate how to reduce the number of IP addresses by using VLSM How to Use VLSM

36 What Is Supernetting? Router Routing table before supernetting Routing table after supernetting

37 Using CIDR to Implement Supernetting Network IDSubnet mask (binary) Starting Ending Class C Example Network ID Subnet mask Subnet mask (binary) CIDR Entry


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