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Annual Brand Planning Cycle 2011

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Presentation on theme: "Annual Brand Planning Cycle 2011"— Presentation transcript:

1 Annual Brand Planning Cycle 2011
Introduction for LOCs

2 Objectives Our objectives To provide an overview of key changes in the Brand Planning process, and reinforcement of key points (for those who did it last year) To provide familiarisation with the process (for those new to GSK Brand Planning) Your expectations What are your expectations? Facilitator guidance: Ask them to spend a couple of minutes talking to the person sitting next to them, then ask anyone to call out their expectations. Write their expectations on a flipchart. If any expectations are out of scope for Brand Planning, explain this immediately (e.g. if someone wants to understand the Campaign development process) Explain that we’ll aim to address most of these expectations during the day. At end of workshop, go back to this flipchart and ‘tick’ against the expectations 2

3 What lessons learned from last year’s process?
Call out What lessons learned from last year’s process? What worked? Any tips for doing it better this year? Facilitator guidance: Capture key points on a flipchart 3

4 Context for Brand Planning
Development and Commercialisation of a Medicine demands a cross-functional collaboration with clear responsibilities 3 Core processes to support the Development and Commercialisation This training focuses on Brand Planning which is intended to smoothly follow the Launch Excellence process: The GSK Brand Planning Process provides an opportunity to review key brands and portfolios and plan for the future. It is a necessary activity that helps ensure that our medicines, which includes our vaccines, continue to be relevant and of appropriate value to patients and healthcare systems Brand planning is expected to be executed, at all times, consistent with our GSK values: Be patient-focused Show respect for people Commit to transparency Demonstrate integrity For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

5 GSK Brand Planning Process – Guidance
Brand Planning must be undertaken consistent with GSK policies, codes, SOPs, operating principles and any other appropriate guidelines – and any stricter or more specific regional and local regulations Strategies developed and activities recommended by CoEs must be consistent with GSK policies, codes, SOPs, operating principles and any other appropriate guidelines and take account of regional differences. These central Strategies and Recommendations cannot take account of all local requirements. The Strategies and Activities are subject to local review requirements to ensure compliance with local policies and regulations, and to ensure consistency with local Marketing Authorisation (e.g., approved labelling) Commercial Strategies and Activities must be designed within the scope of the Marketing Authorisation. Promotion of a medicine must be in accordance with its licensed indication. For each brand there will be separate medically governed Medical Affairs Plans Consistent with policy, no gift, benefit in kind or other advantage may be offered or given to a healthcare professional as an inducement to prescribe, supply, administer, recommend, buy or sell any medicine – or as a reward for doing so Follow Write Right principles: appropriate intent, taking appropriate actions and documenting appropriately. Edit your work: consider whether your documents (including internal documents) demonstrate how your planned activity complies with laws, regulations and codes of practice For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

6 Patient, Payer, Policy Maker and HCP
Development and Commercialisation of Medicines through Cross-Functional Working CUSTOMER Patient, Payer, Policy Maker and HCP Building Evidence Medicines Differentiation Using relevant comparators and meaningful endpoints to demonstrate benefits and value for clearly defined patient groups. Forward- looking lifecycle management by long-term planning of clinical, epidemiological and health outcome studies Establish a clear competitive positioning: Who benefits from the value of the medicine and why? Translate positioning through clear, consistent communication and long-lasting branding Medicine Vision - Lifecycle Management Positioning – Branding Knowledge Cascade Post approval, utilise dissemination of knowledge about a disease and its treatment through a dialogue with our customers to ensure appropriate use of our medicines For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011

7 3 Core Processes to Support the Development and Commercialisation Medicine Vision – Launch Excellence – Brand Planning Phase I & IIA Phase IIB Phase III Commit to File & Launch Lifecycle Medicine Vision Launch Excellence Customer Understanding & Situation Assessment Customer Understanding & Situation Assessment Customer Understanding & Situation Assessment Customer Understanding & Situation Assessment First input into Strategic Foundation Strategic Foundation Review of Strategic Foundation Review of Strategic Foundation (Mid-Term) Strategy Development Review of Strategies Review of Strategies Operational Planning Operational Planning Engagement & Execution Performance Management Marketers will be involved in Medicine Vision, Launch Excellence and Brand Planning – it is a stepwise and iterative process over a long timeframe. Marketers will need to use different skills at each stage as represented by the orange boxes above For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 7 DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

8 Objectives of the Brand Planning Process
Ensure that over their whole lifecycle, GSK medicines continue to be relevant and of value to Patients and Healthcare Systems To make the right decisions in a collaborative way (between CoEs and LOCs and across functions) to achieve the long-term vision for the brand To enable development or review of long-term Brand Strategy and the creation of short-term Operating Plans For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 8 8 8

9 Brand Planning 2011 - Overview of ‘what’s new’
New Operating Model with 3 Global CoEs Requiring global alignment on language, process and output 2010 approach broadly maintained, with some changes What’s changed Process (e.g. clear separation of Medical Affairs from Commercial) Few terminology changes Timing changes Output changes (e.g. some changes in templates) What’s the same Virtual Brand Planning Kick off Conference June 2011 Overall the same process: CoE collaboration with networks Local GMs are responsible for LOC Operating Plans DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

10 Brand Planning Process - 3 Phases
Situation Assessment Strategy Development Operational Planning For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 DRAFT - Bio legal review pending 10 10

11 Brand Planning Process Overview
JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP Global/ Regional CoE + Network* LOC Brands Supported by CoEs Non-CoE Brands Situation Assessment Strategy Development Opera-tional Planning LOC Planning: Situation Assessment, Adoption of Strategies, and Operational Planning Same three basic planning steps but completed independently of CoE and with timing on a case-by-case basis Situation Assessment Strategy Development LOC Operational Planning *CoE works closely with the Priority Markets within the Network to develop all chapters of the Brand Plan For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011

12 Brand Planning Process LOC Brand Plan Implementation (for CoE Brands)
Situation Assessment Situation Assessment Strategy Development Strategy Development Operational Planning Operational Planning Deliverables: Situation Scan Summary Opportunities Deliverables: Reviewed Strategic Foundation Prioritised Opportunities Strategies Performance Measures Deliverables: Detailed Activity Plan for following year – high-level view for the year after Performance Measures Agreed resources and budget CoE Adopt Global Strategies at LOC level On an exception basis, develop LOC-specific Strategies Define LOC Customer Strategies Adopt CoE Performance Measures Plan detailed Activities for following year – high-level view for the year after Adopt / develop Performance Measures for key Activities Agree on resources and budget 2-year P&L Check for consistency and any key differences vs Global / Regional situation Confirm / refine Opportunities at LOC level LOCs For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 12 12

13 Brand Plan and Customer Plan on the Local Level
All plans are structured in 3 parts: Situation Assessment, Strategy Plan and Operating Plan (please refer to the separate Medical Affairs Plan) On the local level, Brand Plans may be “translated” into Customer Plans – e.g., a key Account Plan for a specific hospital chain. How to do that is a local decision CoE Brand Plan Global CoE + Network CoE Situation Assessment CoE Strategy Plan CoE Operating Plan LOC Brand Plan LOC Situation Assessment LOC Strategy Plan LOC Operating Plan LOC LOC / Territory Customer Plan Situation Assessment (focused on Customer and relevant GSK Portfolio) Customer Strategy Plan Customer-specific Operating Plan For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011

14 Portfolio Guidance – Input to the Planning Process
Planning Guidance (Feb) CoEs communicate priority brands for which CoE Brand Plans will be developed and the Investment Category, i.e., Invest for Growth Targeted Investment Manage for Cash Flow CoE Therapy Area Guidance (June) Along with CoE Brand Plans, global CoEs may provide additional strategic guidance on their Therapy Area portfolio (this is optional for Regional CoEs) Regional Portfolio Investment Guidance (June) Regional Presidents, or their delegated colleagues, provide Regional Portfolio Investment Guidance to help LOCs prioritise Therapy Areas, Brands and level of investment / resource This may include detailed investment guidance for key Brands, e.g., sales / Investment Ratios Local Portfolio Guidance GMs may provide additional local Portfolio Investment Guidance to kick off the local Brand Planning Process (optional and timed to local requirements) For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011

15 Brand Planning Process – RACI
Step Deliverable Responsible Accountable Consulted Informed 1 Situation Assessment & Prioritised Opportunities CoE + Network CoE Head Commercial Board of Global CoEs or equivalents All LOCs 2 CoE Brand Strategy Plan Commercial Board of Global CoEs or equivalents* Regional Presidents: During the development period, CoEs will have feedback meetings with senior commercial colleagues from the Regions to discuss drafts of the Strategies 3 CoE Operational Brand Plan Regional Medical Affairs (Plan approved by Medical Function) 4 LOC Brand Plan† LOC GM CoEs review Plans of prioritised LOCs Regional Presidents or their delegated colleagues finally approve LOC Plans - * All Global CoE Plans must be reviewed by assigned legal counsel for global review † Each LOC Brand Plan must go through the required local review process for such LOC For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011

16 Brand Planning Process – Timing Timing Relevant for CoE - LOC Collaboration
Milestone Done by Clarification of which brands to include February CoE Situation Assessment and definition of Opportunities completed March CoE Strategy Plan completed May CoE Operating Plans completed Brand Planning start up communication to LOCs (Brand Plans, Therapy Area Guidance and Regional Portfolio Guidance) 28th June Finalisation of LOC Operating Plans September Virtual Brand Planning kick-off conference In line with Financial Planning requirement (in most Regions, this will occur at the end of September)

17 Brand Planning and Financial Planning (I)
APRIL JUNE AUGUST SEPT/OCT EARLY NOV Share CoE Brand Plans Short feedback on LOC figures of Priority Markets CoE Approval by Regional Presidents and finally Corporate Prepare “top down” target by Region / LOC Finance Develop Operational Plans + P&L (cross-functional contribution) Submit P&L LOC For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011

18 Brand Planning and Financial Planning Timeline (II)
Step What Details Responsible When CoE Guidance Top-line financial Goals for prioritised Brands Peak-year ambition and sales / patient share forecasts for next 3+ years on global or regional level CoE from 3rd June* Finance Guidance Financial Targets for LOCs Corporate initiate, Regions will translate into LOC targets Finance Aug LOC Planning Operational and Financial planning “Bottom up” to match the top-line targets LOCs Aug / Sept (in line with financial planning timeline) Review Challenge and review of draft LOC plans (operational and financial plans) Prioritised Brands / portfolios only for selected / prioritised markets (probably only Commercial Network LOCs) Sept (early enough to influence LOC planning) Discussion and sense-check of regional financial ambition for Global Business Portfolios Discussion of consolidated COE view of LOC ambition regarding prioritised Brands / portfolios, e.g., Growth % range, Brand Contribution, resourcing and tender planners (vaccines) Regional Presidents / Financial delegate – Global Business President / CoE Heads End of Sept Approval of LOC plans Regional Presidents October (in line with financial planning) * CoE Plans must be made available to US Pharma by June 3rd For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011

19 Cross-Functional Working
Brand Planning is a cross-functional process that involves colleagues from areas such as Marketing, Market Access, Medical, Sales, Finance and Government / Corporate Affairs This is true for both CoEs and LOC Brand Planning For elements of the Brand Planning Process that are driven by the Medical function, separate planning and governance steps exist ... For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

20 Separate Medical Affairs Plan
Original Slide of the Brand Planning slide set. Illustrates a separation of Strategies, which was challenged. Situation Assessment Strategy Development Operational Planning 1 2 3 Situation Assessment Full cross-functional team, including both Commercial and Medical, agrees on the Opportunities Commercial Strategy Commercial Operating Plan Commercial Medical Strategy Medical Affairs Operating Plan Medical Commercial and Medical should be fully aligned on Opportunities, which are based on a thorough Situation Assessment conducted by the cross- functional team For each brand there will be a separate medically governed Medical Affairs Plan. This plan describes medically led activities. It is developed, funded and governed by the Medical function For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011

21 Separate Medical Affairs Plan
New slide Situation Assessment Strategy Development Operational Planning 1 2 3 Situation Assessment Full cross-functional team, including both Commercial and Medical, agrees on the Opportunities Strategy Development Cross-functional development of Strategies. Commercial Operating Plan Commercial Medical Affairs Operating Plan Strategy A Medical Strategy B Strategy C Commercial and Medical should be fully aligned on Opportunities, which are based on a thorough Situation Assessment conducted by the cross-functional team Strategies are developed cross-functionally, too. Colleagues, who are accountable for different Operating Plans, develop and discuss Strategies that appropriately describe the top-line direction how to address the selected Opportunities. For each brand there will be separate Operating Plans. Strategies will be picked up in the particular plan they are relevant for and addressed by appropriate Activities. The Medical Affairs Plan is developed, funded and governed by the Medical function

22 Opportunities – Strategies – Activities Current definition (developed in Marketing Ways/Brand Planning project) Activity 1 Opportunity Strategy Activity 2 Activity 3 Opportunity Describes precisely those areas that have the potential to lead to greater value for Patients, Payers, Prescribers and thereby, typically for GSK. Delivering greater value to the Healthcare Systems enables profitable growth for GSK Strategy How the Opportunity will be achieved. Guides resource allocation and typically drives GSK growth Activities The specific Operating Plan elements or tactics that will deliver the Strategy Current Definitions of Opportunity/Strategy/Activities based on the endorsed Marketing Ways DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

23 Long term vision and mid-term guidance in the Brand Planning Process
Strategy Development Strategic Foundation Long Term Strategic Foundation Vision Statement Positioning Payer Value Proposition ... Situation Assessment Opportunity Identification & Prioritisation Strategy Development Mid Term Strategies Operational Planning Activity Prioritisation & Planning Mid Term Strategies to guide Activities

24 Activity Prioritisation
Cross Functional Collaboration and Separate Governance Operating Plans are split between Commercial and Medical Separate Governance Commercial Operational Planning Activity Prioritisation & Planning Strategy A Strategy B Medical Operational Planning Strategy C Data Generation Scientific Engagement Cross Functional Spirit

25 Brand Planning Process 2011
Summary Simple 3 phase approach unchanged vs 2010 Minor changes to language, templates & timing CoE focus is on Opportunities and Strategies LOC focus is on developing & executing Operating Plan Clarity on timelines and what happens in CoE/Network versus LOC

26 Questions? ? ? ? ? Are there any outstanding questions on process
Are there any issues? ? Has this made sense? ? Anything else? ? For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

27 Recommended LOC Brand Plan slides (1/2)
Market Access/Stakeholder analysis Strategic Foundation 3 4 Situation Scan Summary Opportunity Summary For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

28 Recommended LOC Brand Plan slides (1/2)
Market Access/Stakeholder analysis Strategic Foundation Replaces “Brand Ambition”. Minimal changes Minimal changes 3 4 Situation Scan Summary Opportunity Summary Minimal changes New format. No new content DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

29 Recommended LOC Brand Plan slides (2/2)
5 6 Alignment with CoE strategies Summary of Strategies 7 8 Summary of Activities Performance Measures For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011 DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

30 Recommended LOC Brand Plan slides (2/2)
5 6 Alignment with CoE strategies Summary of Strategies Replaces “Drivers of Growth”. Minimal changes Mirrors last year’s Drivers of Growth template 7 8 Summary of Activities Performance Measures Minimal changes No change DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

31 Strategic Foundation 1 Vision Statement
The measurable long-term strategic goal for the brand and a summary description of why that goal is achievable Brand Positioning The Who (Priority Patient Segment) and the Why (Evidence-based reason the brand should be chosen in preference to other options) Treatment Evolution / Lifecycle Planning Knowledge Gaps identified in Treatment Evolution planning and proposed strategies to close these gaps. Priorities for lifecycle planning. (The implementation of Treatment Evolution strategies must take place post - Marketing Authorisation for a given indication of a medicine) Payer Value Proposition Summarising how the brand delivers value to Payers compared with other therapeutic and non-therapeutic options Investment Category and Guidance Guidance on the right balance between investment and profitability, based on stage in Lifecycle and position in portfolio. Typically this will be the same for all Regions. Specify if there are any variations by Region. The specific investment multiple ratio or incremental sales-to-investment ratio assigned to each investment category that guides Marketing Investment levels Top-Line Financial Goals 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Sales target for next 5 years (£m & yr / yr growth %) £m (%) Category share of all therapies in Target Patient Segment X% Y% Z% GSK share of category in Target Patient Segment

32 Likely to be taken direct from CoE
Strategic Foundation Likely to be taken direct from CoE LOC Specific 1 Vision Statement The measurable long-term strategic goal for the brand and a summary description of why that goal is achievable Brand Positioning The Who (Priority Patient Segment) and the Why (Evidence-based reason the brand should be chosen in preference to other options) Treatment Evolution / Lifecycle Planning Knowledge Gaps identified in Treatment Evolution planning and proposed strategies to close these gaps. Priorities for lifecycle planning. (The implementation of Treatment Evolution strategies must take place post - Marketing Authorisation for a given indication of a medicine) Payer Value Proposition Summarising how the brand delivers value to Payers compared with other therapeutic and non-therapeutic options Investment Category and Guidance Guidance on the right balance between investment and profitability, based on stage in Lifecycle and position in portfolio. Typically this will be the same for all Regions. Specify if there are any variations by Region. The specific investment multiple ratio or incremental sales-to-investment ratio assigned to each investment category that guides Marketing Investment levels Facilitator notes: “Strategic Foundation” replaces “Brand Ambition” On CoE brands, most of the content is likely to come from the CoE This content is unlikely to change much from year to year Top-Line Financial Goals 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Sales target for next 5 years (£m & yr / yr growth %) £m (%) Category share of all therapies in Target Patient Segment X% Y% Z% GSK share of category in Target Patient Segment

33 Strategic Foundation: Vision Statement
Definition: The Vision Statement is the measurable long-term strategic goal for the Brand and a summary description of why that goal is achievable Relevance to Brand Planning: Initially developed in Launch Excellence Process. Reviewed by the CoE during Brand Planning if significant changes in: Scientific understanding associated with the medicine Indications on the label Regulatory/reimbursement restrictions Foresight associated with competitors, customers and the environment Unlikely that a LOC brand will have a significantly different Vision Statement versus CoE version Facilitator notes: It is possible that the LOC may have to adapt the Vision Statement from the CoE – e.g. if the strategic goal as expressed by the CoE is unattainable in the LOC. However, (i) this is only rarely the case; & (ii) it is likely in these circumstances that the LOC Vision Statement retains a high degree of consistency versus the CoE Vision Statement Example: To be the #1 prescribed topical for the treatment of mild to moderate sufferers by providing the optimum combination of tolerability and fast results Fictitious example for training purposes only

34 Strategic Foundation: Brand Positioning
Definition: A brand is positioned by defining WHO the product is particularly appropriate for (Priority Patient Segment) and WHY it is distinctive / better than competitors (based on the current or anticipated label). Positioning, when translated through propositions, gives the customer a compelling reason to choose it in preference to alternatives Relevance to Brand Planning: During brand planning, Brand Positioning may be reviewed and altered if customer insight, reimbursement status, competitor assessment or environmental analysis indicate that a new WHO or WHY are required in order for the brand to be of value LOC Positioning likely to be identical to CoE’s, unless variation required due to differing local regulatory or competitor considerations Example: WHO: mild to moderate sufferers WHY: offers best in class tolerability and speed of action Fictitious example for training purposes only

35 Strategic Foundation: Treatment Evolution
Definition: Treatment Evolution is a concept that: supports gaining understanding of if and how much current treatment practice may need to change before a new medicine can deliver value for its appropriate use guides in planning how to close existing knowledge gaps to enable treatment practice changes to happen  Planning of Treatment Evolution should take place early in the development of a medicine, but any execution of this plan utilising the Knowledge Cascade must take place after Marketing Authorisation of a medicine and consistent with its label Relevance to Brand Planning: Some of the Strategies & Activities within Brand Planning are likely to be for Treatment Evolution Usually the Strategies will be specified by the CoE, for local adoption and activation Facilitator notes: Any Strategy that focuses on addressing Knowledge Gaps to enable changes in treatment practice by HCPs is likely to be a Medical Affairs responsibility, not Marketing While the Strategy may be specified by the CoE, it likely that much of the communication activity will be developed at LOC level Note: If Strategic Foundation template is too restrictive, an additional slide on Treatment Evolution can be added into the Brand Planning deck Example: Raise awareness amongst mild to moderate sufferers who cannot control the condition via OTC medication that they may be able to get more effective treatment on prescription

36 Strategic Foundation: Lifecycle Plan
Definition: The Lifecycle plan is the plan for a medicine identifying the progression to new patient segments within the current label and in anticipation of new indications over time and the data required to support this. Relevance to Brand Planning: Brand Plans need to reflect Opportunities presented by progression to new patient segments or indications, as summarised in the Lifecycle Plan The Lifecycle Plan is developed in the Launch Excellence phase. It is reviewed by the CoE within Brand Planning, and updated if necessary to reflect changes in scientific understanding, the environment, the label, reimbursement, clinical trials outcomes or other factors The Lifecycle Plan for an LOC brand may occasionally differ vs. the CoE (e.g. due to local regulatory considerations) Facilitator Notes: Typically a new product will add new segments and indications through its lifecycle, or start as an add-on / end of line treatment and progress to being used earlier in the treatment pathway. This progression will have formed part of the plans in the Launch Excellence phase, and be reviewed annually by the CoE within Brand Planning. LOCs are likely to closely follow the recommendations from CoEs, but it is possible that the LOC plan will vary (e.g. different timings due to resource considerations, effect of different regulatory situation, etc.) The relevance of this section to Brand Planning is that it highlights if there are new Opportunities arising (e.g. to target a new patient segment) that need to be reflected in the Strategies & Activities in the Brand Plan The Lifecycle Plan is not just about adding new segments and indications. It could include anticipated changed in positioning as a result of changes in the competitive or reimbursement landscape, or due to changes in resource level in late stage lifecycle (which might require moving to a more narrowly defined positioning) Example: Once daily extended release tablet approval expected July 2012

37 Market Access Customer and Stakeholder Analysis
2 Critical Stakeholder Groups Present Status (describe current situation) Desired Status (describe desired situation) Impact (H,M,L) Likelihood to achieve in current plan period E.g., Regulatory National or Regional, e.g., FDA / EMA Xxxx H Xxx E.g., HTA Body National or provincial Health Technology Assessment body E.g., Health Insurers Public or Private, e.g., Sick Fund (Germany) or Sanitas (Spain) E.g., Formulary Budget Holder Provincial or Hospital budget holders Other Other key recommendation bodies or funding decision-makers 37

38 Market Access Customer and Stakeholder Analysis
2 Critical Stakeholder Groups Present Status (describe current situation) Desired Status (describe desired situation) Impact (H,M,L) Likelihood to achieve in current plan period E.g., Regulatory National or Regional, e.g., FDA / EMA Xxxx H Xxx E.g., HTA Body National or provincial Health Technology Assessment body E.g., Health Insurers Public or Private, e.g., Sick Fund (Germany) or Sanitas (Spain) E.g., Formulary Budget Holder Provincial or Hospital budget holders Other Other key recommendation bodies or funding decision-makers Template almost identical to last year Do in conjunction with LOC Market Access specialists Add or delete Stakeholder Groups as appropriate 38

39 Agenda Session 1 Introduction & overview of Brand Planning process 2
Recommended slides 3 Strategic Foundation & Market Access 4 Situation Scan & Opportunities 5 Adopting Strategies 6 Operational Planning: Defining LOC Activities 7 Defining Performance Measures 8 Next Steps 39

40 Situation Scan Summary
External Internal Situation Scan Summary 3 Positives Negatives 40

41 Situation Scan Summary
External Internal Situation Scan Summary 3 Positives Patient Payer HCP Competitor Other Product & Organisation Negatives Facilitator notes: This shows how this year’s template relates to the one used last year, which was split into separate columns for Patient, Payer, HCP, Competitor & Other…..these are all “External” “Internal” = the individual Product and GSK’s positives and negatives as an organisation Last year versus this year 41

42 Situation Scan Summary
External Internal Situation Scan Summary 3 Positives Same approach as last year Use CoE output as start point Check for consistency and any key differences vs Global / Regional situation Confirm / refine Opportunities at LOC level Refer to Opportunity & Growth Planning e-module for further guidance Negatives

43 Creating the LOC Situation Scan Summary
CoE Situational Scan Summary Market Access & LOC Situation Scan LOC Situational Scan Summary + = Facilitator please add: The LOC should start with the CoE Situation Scan Summary and add any critical findings from a local Situation Scan and Market Access Customer & Stakeholder Analysis 43 43

44 How to undertake a Situation Scan
Think broadly about the brand and therapy area to identify areas to investigate further Ask: What has changed significantly since last year? What is expected to change significantly over the next two years? What do we need to investigate further? Facilitator guidance: If asked, explain what each group includes: Patient (Self explanatory) Other (Any other factors impacting the business. Could include channel, distribution, political, environmental, social, technological factors) Payer (People or groups who impact on Market Access status. Would include External Experts where important to Market Access) HCP (People who make or influence prescribing or treatment practice decisions. Includes general practitioners, specialists, pharmacists, vaccinators, nurses or other clinical healthcare staff. Would also include External Experts where they influence treatment practice.) Competitor (Competitor product or capability strengths or weaknesses, and competitor activities) Product and Organisation (All factors relating to product or organisational strengths or weaknesses, including organisational capability. Also includes GSK activity or data.) Dive Deep only where needed to explore further 44 44 44 44 44

45 Conduct Deep Dive analysis only on areas of change
For example: The Situation Scan identified a significant change in the number of patients being treated with prescription Use PATIENT Deep Dive tools / questions to gain a deeper understanding of what is causing this change. For example: What factors or trends are contributing to the change? How can the change be explained through the Patient Potential Tower? Facilitator please add: The Deep Dive drills down to understand what the impact of the change is (or is going to be) and why it is occurring (or will occur) This depth of understanding is necessary as it will help to confirm or define Growth Opportunities and related challenges Facilitator guidance: Emphasise the example of using the PPT as a tool for analysis. Mention that there are many tools we can use that can help depending on the analysis required, for example Treatment Pathway, Value Proposition, Prescription Concentration. Use the Deep Dive questions and other relevant tools / approaches where required to further investigate the situation 45 45 45

46 Situation Scan – recommended Deep Dive questions
EXTERNAL INTERNAL Patient Payer HCP Competitor Other Product & Organization Is the change observed amongst all, or a specific group of patients? How can the change be explained through the Patient Potential Tower? What factors or trends are contributing to the change in patient practice? What new patient insight data do we have that could explain the change? Are patients become more influential in prescribing or market access decisions? Has the re-imbursement status for our brand changed? Is this likely to change in the near future? What is the influence map for payers and how has this evolved? What healthcare reforms are expected in the future that could affect our brands? Is there any government guidance on selected therapeutic area/disease? Has this changed? Who are the key advisors for clinical/policy guidelines recommendations and formulary inclusion? Have they changed? Are there data gaps between what we can produce and what is required by decision makers? How confident are we with data to achieve reimbursement at an appropriate price? Is the change observed across all or specific HCP types or segments? What is driving prescription in the market? Does this vary by customer type or segment? What is the current Knowledge and Practice of HCPs? What triggers decisions in the treatment pathway? Which stakeholders influence HCP practice? How concentrated are HCPs? Have our competitors Strategic Objectives, Drivers of Growth or Programmes and Activities appear to have changed? Is their A&P investment or sales force resource changing? Has their Brand’s positioning become better understood, competitive and motivating? How well equipped are they to execute their strategy? Have there been any significant environmental changes? Are there options within new distribution channels? Is the impact of generics in this therapy area changing? Is the distribution chain changing? Are buying or decision points concentrating? What is the role of Key Account Management? Are there any manufacturing or logistics issues? Are there any changes to terms of payments? What is the role of pharmacists in stocking or prescription decision making? How does our brand perform against the most important product attributes in our therapy area? Does our data adequately support our positioning? Does our positioning support a clear and relevant differentiation? How robust is our evidence relevant to competitors? Is our positioning effectively communicated and understood? How effectively have we engaged our sales force? What is the impact of our sales force? Do we have the right allocation of resource? How clear/effective is our HCP targeting? Facilitator please add: These questions are a prompt for typical deep dives that may be needed. They are not a prescriptive check list to research.

47 Situation Scan: Get input from LOC Government Affairs
Guidance on local trends for particular healthcare system Local Government Affairs team provides overview of trends for each market at the beginning of the Operational Planning period Members of the local Government Affairs group support discussion with cross-functional Brand team on impact for particular Brands For GSK Internal Use Only – 25 Feb 2011

48 Call out For brands that you work on, where might you need to do a Deep Dive this year? Why? 48

49 Opportunities 4 Opportunity Challenge to Address Likelihood 1 2 3 4 5

50 What do we mean by an Opportunity?
Definition: Opportunities describe precisely those areas that have the potential to lead to greater value for Patients, Payers, Prescribers and thereby, typically for GSK Delivering greater value to the Healthcare Systems enables profitable growth for GSK Facilitator notes: Previous definition: “Describes where growth could come from or may describe an opportunity to minimise potential losses”. New definition emphasises requirement that an Opportunity provides greater value to customers. Was known as “Growth Opportunity” last year. Was considered confusing that some Growth Opportunities didn’t actually involve “Growth”, as they equated to “loss minimisation” 50 50

51 Examples of Opportunities
In the first-line setting, GSK Brand X offers the priority patient segment improved efficacy vs competitors. There are about 10,000 additional patients who could benefit from Brand X (worth approx £5m p.a.) Example: GSK Brand X offers patient group Z longer-term efficacy. There is no financial value in this opportunity, but it is in line with GSK commitment to helping in this area where there is an unmet medical need Facilitator note: Opportunities usually but not always result in a financial benefit for GSK. The second example illustrates this 51 51

52 Most Opportunities originate from four sources of growth
Optimise patient flow Within the defined target patient segment, is it appropriate to bring more patients into treatment? Gain share from competitors Is there an opportunity to gain share from competitors? Optimise therapy for existing patients Is there a significant difference between optimal and actual dosage levels? Can the number of scripts filled with Brand X be optimised? To what extent can patient adherence be improved? Facilitator notes: In principle, we want our medicines to reach the broadest group of appropriate patients. However, it is important to consider how the brand is positioned and be clear about who our Priority Patient Segment is – i.e. stay on strategy from Positioning standpoint! Optimised value equation for payers The ability of a healthcare system to fund treatments impacts the level of care and treatment options offered to patients. Can the value equation for payers be optimised in order to maximise patient access and care? 52

53 Getting from Opportunities to Strategies: Identifying Challenges
Only 40% (2m) of patients with mild symptoms are prescribed therapy x, even though most would benefit from this therapy. There is a realistic opportunity to bring a further 5% of these patients into appropriate treatment within 3 years. The financial value of this opportunity is approximately £100m over 3 years Opportunity Challenge The main challenge standing in the way of this opportunity is that many older physicians are not aware that this is a chronic inflammatory condition that can be managed Who Knowledge Facilitator note: Once you have defined the Challenge, you can ask “what would it take to address this, within a reasonable timeframe?” If it looks too expensive / difficult / long term compared with other alternatives, the Opportunity may not be worth progressing Accurately defining the “Challenge” is critical to enable you to judge how feasible it is to realise the Opportunity

54 Which analyses were most valuable?
Call out Last year, how similar / different were the LOC Opportunities vs those provided by the CoE? Which analyses were most valuable? 54

55 Agenda Session 1 Introduction & overview of Brand Planning process 2
Recommended slides 3 Strategic Foundation & Market Access 4 Situation Scan & Opportunities 5 Adopting Strategies 6 Operational Planning: Defining LOC Activities 7 Defining Performance Measures 8 Next Steps 55

56 Strategies 5 Opportunity Summary Strategy 1 Priority Opportunity 1
2 3

57 Strategies “Strategies” replace “Drivers of Growth”
5 Opportunity Summary Strategy 1 Priority Opportunity 1 Strategy 1 2 3 “Strategies” replace “Drivers of Growth” Likely to be high level of continuity from last year Probable that most / all Strategies are same as those specified by CoE Refer to Opportunity & Growth Planning e-module for further guidance

58 LOC Alignment with CoE Strategy
6 Opportunities Strategy Alignment with CoE Rationale 1 Opportunity 1 CoE Strategy 1 e.g.,  Xxxx 2 Opportunity 2 CoE Strategy 2 3 Opportunity 3 CoE Strategy 3 ALT LOC Specific Strategy (if required) n/a Facilitator notes: This template is same as last year. Use it to identify consistency vs. recommended strategies from CoE, and highlight any key differences 58

59 LOC Alignment with CoE Strategy
6 Opportunities Strategy Alignment with CoE Rationale 1 Opportunity 1 CoE Strategy 1 e.g.,  Xxxx 2 Opportunity 2 CoE Strategy 2 3 Opportunity 3 CoE Strategy 3 ALT LOC Specific Strategy (if required) n/a Show if you are not going to adopt a CoE recommended Strategy Facilitator notes: This template is same as last year. Use it to identify consistency vs. recommended strategies from CoE, and highlight any key differences Add any LOC specific strategy, and explain rationale 59

60 Adopt Strategies from CoE. On exceptional* basis, define new Strategies
Definition: Strategies describe how the Opportunity will be achieved. They guide resource allocation and typically drive GSK growth Example: Enhance HCP’s knowledge about the compelling benefit offered by Brand X to optimise appropriate usage in approved treatment settings Facilitator notes: Emphasise that typically the LOC will adopt the CoE Strategy unchanged. However, sometimes they may need adaptation due to local regulatory considerations, or may not be appropriate (e.g. due to unique market situation in your LOC). Additionally, occasionally there will be a need for unique new strategies for LOCs that are not derived from CoE specified ones. * Occasionally CoE Strategies may need adapting, or may not be appropriate for an LOC, and/or there may be a need for new Strategies for an LOC, due to unique market / regulatory situation. DRAFT - Bio legal review pending

61 How a Strategy relates to an Opportunity
There are currently 2m patients (20% of target patients) being treated for this condition with x therapeutic class. This could be increased to 3m (30% of target patients) A number of GPs believe this condition is psychological, not physical, and does not merit drug treatment Strategy Guidelines Educate GPs that this condition can be the physical result of other comorbid conditions and is treatable through prescription Addresses the challenge Yes Enables clear choices to be made Specific & single minded Overall….. all examples are fictitious 61

62 At LOC level, Brand Plans need to be “translated” into Customer Plans
All plans are structured in 3 parts: Situation Assessment, Strategy Plan and Operating Plan (please refer to the separate Medical Affairs Plan) On the local level, Brand Plans need to be “translated” into Customer Plans – e.g., a Key Account Plan for a specific hospital chain. How to do that is a local decision Global CoE + Network LOC CoE Brand Plan CoE Situation Assessment CoE Strategy Plan CoE Operating Plan LOC Brand Plan LOC Situation Assessment LOC Strategy Plan LOC Operating Plan LOC / Territory Customer Plan Situation Assessment (focused on Customer and relevant GSK Portfolio) Customer Strategy Plan Customer-specific Operating Plan

63 Prepare to feedback in plenary discussion
Strategy Exercise Exercise In brand teams: Discuss how different you expect this year’s Strategies be vs. last year. What will be key changes? Prepare to feedback in plenary discussion mins 63

64 Agenda Session 1 Introduction & overview of Brand Planning process 2
Recommended slides 3 Strategic Foundation & Market Access 4 Situation Scan & Opportunities 5 Adopting Strategies 6 Operational Planning: Defining LOC Activities 7 Defining Performance Measures 8 Next Steps 64

65 Activities: Description
7 1 Strategy Activities: Description Timing Budget 2 3 4 5 6

66 Activities: Description
7 1 Strategy Activities: Description Timing Budget 2 3 4 5 6 “Activities” replaces “Programmes & Activities” Include CoE-initiated Activities that will impact your market Adopt CoE recommendations for LOC Activities if relevant to your market Plan in detail for 2012, outline for 2013 Base plans on thorough analysis of effectiveness of spending on recent Activities

67 Line of Sight LINE OF SIGHT Facilitator please add:
In reviewing Operational Plans, check there is Line of Sight between: Opportunities, Strategies and Activities . Also ask whether the plan is sufficient to deliver the Strategy. To do this: Check the plan and be clear about the rationale for choices Seek challenge and comment from others (incl. line manager and extended brand team) to help refine the plan Activities & Performance Measures Opportunity Strategy 67 67

68 Example: Line of Sight Opportunity Strategy Activity
The opportunity is to increase Brand X’s Rx share within category from 3% to 5%, across all target patients. This would be worth an additional £40,000 p.a. to the brand. The challenge is that HCPs of all types do not understand that Brand X delivers increased tolerability and has equivalent efficacy. Opportunity Strategy Differentiate Brand X by convincing target HCPs that it offers patients similar efficacy and improved tolerability Activity Sales rep detailing to HCP targets A and B, with new campaign focused on tolerability Performance Measures Measure: HCP A and B awareness of tolerability Target: 25% of HCP A and B to be aware by end of July 2012 ANIMATED SLIDE Facilitator please add: To check Line of Sight, we need to see that there is a logical link through the plan For example, the following Opportunity, Strategy, Activity and Measure are well aligned 68 68

69 Getting from Strategies to Activities: Overview
Example Strategy Improve correct diagnosis by educating doctors on the condition, and how to differentiate it from other sleep disturbances Knowledge Cascade Operational Segmentation & Targeting A priority: Primary care physicians seeing more than 20 sleep disorder patients/month. Communication Channel Selection Sales force, CLM, eCME, speaker meetings, etc. Detailed Activity Planning Detailed timing, coverage and spend by type of activity Campaign Development & Implementation Development of communication materials, sales force briefing, implementation What is our approach to achieving the appropriate change in practice? Example for training purposes only

70 Getting from Strategies to Activities: Overview
Example Strategy Improve correct diagnosis by educating doctors on the condition, and how to differentiate it from other sleep disturbances Knowledge Cascade Operational Segmentation & Targeting A priority: Primary care physicians seeing more than 20 sleep disorder patients/month. Communication Channel Selection Sales force, CLM, eCME, speaker meetings, etc. Detailed Activity Planning Detailed timing, coverage and spend by type of activity Campaign Development & Implementation Development of communication materials, sales force briefing, implementation On which customer groups do we need to focus communications, and how will we prioritise customers within the groups for resource allocation? Example for training purposes only

71 Customer Group Selection / Operational Segmentation & Targeting
Target Customer Segment HCPs are the gatekeepers for getting a product prescribed for its Priority Patient Segment Prescription potential for the appropriate patient access is not equally distributed among all customers; in the UK top 20% of GPs prescribe 32X more asthma scripts than bottom 20% Therefore we have to prioritise which HCPs we will target for communication to use our resources most effectively We can then select a different mix of communication channels and level of Activities for each target customer segment D B C A 71

72 Segmentation & Targeting – things to consider
Check if your current S&T (if available) is still relevant: Has there been a change in? Label, customer group importance, customer ability to prescribe brand (removal of prior market access restrictions), customer attitude to the product or treatment approach, positioning of brand, available resources to target customers, etc. What is the S&T guidance from the CoE and is that applicable to your market reality? What have been the past learnings from implementation What local customer insight is available (from market research/ customer facing roles) Make sure to involve affected customer facing roles when developing S&T approach to increase their understanding, ownership and buy-in to the approach and the final activity/ communication plan by customer segment Monitor measures to understand success of S&T strategy and execution If you want to learn more about S&T, you can find more information on the CCoE webpage

73 Content of Segmentation and Targeting guidance typically provided by CoE
Current brand strategy and Priority customer group(s) High-level description of each customer group (e.g. by specialty) for whom customer propositions should be developed and overview of priority customers that the business is focussing on strategically to ensure appropriate patient access Segmentation Criteria Developed for each customer group in line with brand strategy, ideally limited to 3- 4 per customer group to avoid an overly complex segmentation Guidance on how to collect the profiling information (3rd party data/ customer facing roles) Targeting guidance Guidance on customer segments to focus resources on, what channels to use and what messages to focus on for the different target audience(s) Supporting materials (optional) Details on any pilot(s) or market research conducted to develop the strategy and increase confidence in the approach (Optional) How customer profile was developed and why it is appropriate Implementation considerations Results of testing a real environment

74 Example of CoE segmentation and targeting guidance: Duodart
Segmentation Guidance for GPs/ Urologists Dimension Measure Rationale Source Profiling questions Potential Number of BPH patients initiated on therapy For what number BPH patients does the GP/ Specialist initiate therapy Rep / 3rd Party data What number of BPH patients does the doctor initiate alpha blocker therapy? Attitude Interest in BPH education Doctor who follows BPH development is more likely to be receptive to a new treatment approach – Duodart Rep We will be running some lectures and meetings on LUTS, would you be interested in attending? Level of innovation Identify doctors who are more confident to prescribe a new treatment approach to the appropriate patients Rep/ 3rd Party data When does the doctor start using a new product? Targeting Guidance Segment Potential/ Attitude Targeting A High potential, receptive practice high sales force/A&P resource B High potential, less receptive practice/ low interest lower resource, appropriate messaging C Low potential, receptive practice medium to low sales/A&P resource D Medium potential and practice targeted investment only E Low potential and practice no sales force investment, low/no A&P Attitude Potential B A C E D

75 Getting from Strategies to Activities: Overview
Example Strategy Improve correct diagnosis by educating doctors on the condition, and how to differentiate it from other sleep disturbances Knowledge Cascade Operational Segmentation & Targeting A priority: Primary care physicians seeing more than 20 sleep disorder patients/month. Communication Channel Selection Sales force, CLM, eCME, speaker meetings, etc. Detailed Activity Planning Detailed timing, coverage and spend by type of activity Campaign Development & Implementation Development of communication materials, sales force briefing, implementation Which channels should be used for Communication & Customer Engagement with these prescribers? Example for training purposes only

76 Effective Channel Selection and Activity Planning & Implementation is driven by deep understanding of customers, and how to interact with them Strategy Development In-depth review of Strategic Foundation only in the event of significant changes Forecasting Positioning & Proposition Development Portfolio Investment Guidance Treatment Evolution Lifecycle & Evidence Planning Review and refresh if necessary Medium-Term Strategy Development Operational Planning Situation Assessment Activity Prioritisation & Planning 360° Customer Understanding (Patient, Payer, Policy Maker and HCP) Environment, Treatment Dynamics & Competitive Landscape Campaign Development Customer Insight & Foresight Opportunity Identification & Prioritisation Customer Group Identification Facilitator notes: It is predominantly an LOC responsibility to select the channels for interacting with customers. That requires a really deep understanding of what these customers are doing, how they are getting their information, what sources of information do they regard as most credible, how they prefer to be communicated with, etc.. Engagement & Execution Team Engagement Activity Implementation Measurement Performance Measurement 76 76 76

77 Key questions to consider when selecting communications channels and specifying Activities plans
1 What investment category is your brand in? 2 What is the right balance in resource allocation between Treatment Evolution and Medicine Differentiation? 3 From your Knowledge Map, what Knowledge Shift & practice change are you trying to achieve? 4 Do you have the required resource to implement your Strategy effectively? 5 Are your Activities within your country’s legal guidelines and the GSK guidelines? 6 What is the best way to access your target cost effectively? 7 What are the learnings to date - from your brand, your Therapy Area, country or those in other countries? 8 How good are your resources and capabilities for using a particular activity? 77 77

78 Getting from Strategies to Activities: Overview
Example Strategy Improve correct diagnosis by educating doctors on the condition, and how to differentiate it from other sleep disturbances Knowledge Cascade Operational Segmentation & Targeting A priority: Primary care physicians seeing more than 20 sleep disorder patients/month. Communication Channel Selection Sales force, CLM, eCME, speaker meetings, etc. Detailed Activity Planning Detailed timing, coverage and spend by type of activity Campaign Development & Implementation Development of communication materials, sales force briefing, implementation What specifically do we plan for each communication channel? Spend, timing, coverage, etc. Example for training purposes only

79 Detailed Activity Planning: The CSI Approach
Having created a list of possible activities for each Strategy, clear choices need to be made about which ones to implement CSI provides a framework for comparing activities against their Coverage, Spend and Impact. It can help stimulate debate, leading to more robust investment decisions

80 The CSI Approach What is meant by Coverage, Spend and Impact?
Coverage considers the audience which engages with each activity Spend looks at the cost of executing the activity Impact assesses the outcome of the activity with the customer

81 The CSI Approach Coverage
Coverage is the number of target customers who interact with the activity, rather than the number the activity reaches The Audience is how many target customers the activity will reach Coverage is the number who will interact with the activity Activity Example: Audience Example: Coverage Direct Mail # mailed # responding eDetail # invited to take part # completing Symposium # invited # attending CME 81

82 The CSI Approach Spend Spend is the true cost of implementing an activity Consider both fixed and variable costs e.g. For a medical education meeting: Fixed costs may include hiring a suitable meeting room Variable costs may include invitations and delegate accommodation When there are high fixed costs, always try to maximise the Coverage by reaching the widest, most relevant audience possible

83 The CSI approach Impact
Impact is the effectiveness of the activity in delivering the Strategies is a measure of how well customers engage with the activity is key to ensure that the activity is not only ‘heard’ but acted upon The impact of each activity can be considered with 3 questions: How well will the activity engage customers? How well aligned is the activity to the Strategy? How likely is it that the activity will change treatment practice in line with the Strategy? Facilitator add: As an organisation, GSK plays a role in sharing knowledge with customers and those involved in the Knowledge Cascade so that patients receive the most appropriate treatments. Coverage of target customers and investment can be accurately measured, however in order to assess the impact of our activities we often need to use judgement. Therefore the CSI tool should not be used as a Return on Investment (ROI) calculator, its role is to assess the likely impact of our activities on treatment practice based on judgement and previous experience. Clearly some Activities (e.g. 1:1 face to face discussion) have a much higher impact than others (e.g. journal advertising) 83

84 Combining Activities: Synergy
Synergy is combining Activities to gain more impact from the combination than from the individual Activities alone How to gain synergy? Build activities into programmes, around a large activity or large external event, or using a theme e.g. Congress, World Aids Day, vacciNation 1 Use a consistent idea and design e.g. vacciNation ‘Missing moments in life’ 2 Reinforce consistent messages across a variety of channels e.g. web, journal ad, sales aid 3

85 Getting from Strategies to Activities: Overview
Example Strategy Improve correct diagnosis by educating doctors on the condition, and how to differentiate it from other sleep disturbances Knowledge Cascade Operational Segmentation & Targeting A priority: Primary care physicians seeing more than 20 sleep disorder patients/month. Communication Channel Selection Sales force, CLM, eCME, speaker meetings, etc. Detailed Activity Planning Detailed timing, coverage and spend by type of activity Campaign Development & Implementation Development of communication materials, sales force briefing, implementation Implementation – once Brand Plan is agreed Example for training purposes only

86 Getting from Strategies to Activities: Summary
Current Practice Not assessing patients with sleep disturbance for Restless Leg Syndrome Future Practice Routinely assess sleep disturbance patients for Restless Leg Syndrome Typically specified by CoE Current Knowledge I know little about RLS, & don’t know how to distinguish it from other causes of sleep disturbance Knowledge Shift Future Knowledge I know it RLS is a significant cause of sleep disturbance & know how to diagnose it Example for training purposes only Facilitator notes: There is an Opportunity to increase the number of doctors correctly diagnosing RLS The Knowledge Map shows that the issue is that they don’t think of it, and don’t know what to look for when a patient with sleep disturbance presents to them The Strategy is to raise awareness of RLS, and educate doctors in how to diagnose it correctly Typically this will all be decided by the CoE. Progressing to the Knowledge Cascade, while the CoE may implement Activities that go across countries, and provide communication campaign materials, the LOC will have to work out the more details Operational Segmentation and Targeting, select the channels to use for communications and customer engagement, and plan activities in detail STRATEGY: Raise awareness of RLS as a cause of sleep disturbance, and educate doctors in its correct diagnosis Knowledge Cascade: Operational Segmentation & Targeting Communications Channel Selection Detailed Activity Planning 86 86 86

87 Getting from Strategies to Activities: Example
Current Knowledge I know little about RLS, & don’t know how to distinguish it from other causes of sleep disturbance Knowledge Shift Future Knowledge I know it RLS is a significant cause of sleep disturbance & know how to diagnose it STRATEGY: Raise awareness of RLS as a cause of sleep disturbance, and educate doctors in its correct diagnosis Typically specified by LOC The Knowledge Cascade Operational Segmentation & Targeting Primary Care Physicans seeing 20+ sleep disorder patients/month Communications Channel Selection Sales force, CLM, eCME, speaker meetings, etc. Detailed Activity Plan Detailed timing, coverage and spend by type of activity Example for training purposes only Facilitator notes: There is an Opportunity to increase the number of doctors correctly diagnosing RLS The Knowledge Map shows that the issue is that they don’t think of it, and don’t know what to look for when a patient with sleep disturbance presents to them The Strategy is to raise awareness of RLS, and educate doctors in how to diagnose it correctly Typically this will all be decided by the CoE. Progressing to the Knowledge Cascade, while the CoE may implement Activities that go across countries, and provide communication campaign materials, the LOC will have to work out the more details Operational Segmentation and Targeting, select the channels to use for communications and customer engagement, and plan activities in detail 87 87 87

88 The growth of the internet is creating a permanent shift in the way physicians and patients are engaging with healthcare information Facilitator notes: 2.2bn users by 2013. The changes in how doctors and patients engage with healthcare information represents both an opportunity and a threat: It’s an opportunity because now there are many new ways of interacting with customers and stakeholders It’s a threat because big pharma’s traditional sales force-based model is breaking down 88

89 There are a whole range of different Digital marketing activities
Website eSymposia Webcast Mobile Marketing eDetail Live Meeting Rep with CLM eCME Contact Centre Online Forums Live Chat Facilitator notes: There is a huge choice of ways in which a brand can use digital communications. The way to approach this is not to ask, “how should we use digital?” or “which of these channels should we be using?”. It is to ask “what are our strategies, what is the communications task to be done as part of the Knowledge Cascade, and how could Digital contribute to this?” Online training Recorded Meeting Social Media eCommerce 89

90 Inclusion of Digital within Operating Plans
From A&P standpoint, “Digital” is just another medium! Brands do not need a “Digital Strategy”….they need to work out how to use Digital Activities to execute existing Strategies! Local Brand Groups may get guidance from Therapy Area & Digital CoEs But don’t restrict yourselves to what is developed by CoEs….they have limited resource, and this is a fast moving area where everyone is learning: MAJOR OPPORTUNITY FOR LOCs TO DEVELOP BREAKTHROUGH APPROACHES! Facilitator notes: The first and second bullets are absolutely fundamental. It is not a strategy to “use digital”! Brand Groups need to take an existing strategy (e.g. to improve awareness of x), then work out which communication methods are most effective / efficient…..with one of the these communication methods possibly being Digital 90

91 Call out: Digital discussion
What have been most effective new Digital Activities in past year, for GSK & competitors? How have they been integrated with other channels? 91

92 Agenda Session 1 Introduction & overview of Brand Planning process 2
Recommended slides 3 Strategic Foundation & Market Access 4 Situation Scan & Opportunities 5 Adopting Strategies 6 Operational Planning: Defining LOC Activities 7 Defining Performance Measures 8 Next Steps Facilitator please add: Timings can be updated with actual local timings Facilitator guidance: These are approximate timings – please reflect on what the key training need is within your local market and amend timings accordingly Confirm when coffee break and lunch break will be Confirm end time of workshop 92

93 Performance Measurement
8 Measure LOC target Strategy 1 X Activity Y Z Strategy 2 Strategy 3

94 Performance Measurement
8 Measure LOC target Strategy 1 X Activity Y Z Strategy 2 Strategy 3 CoE will recommend what Measures to use (particularly for Strategies). Important for enabling comparisons between markets All Strategies should be measured Be selective about which Activities are worth measuring Strategy Measures are typically changes in knowledge or practice at specific points in the Patient Potential Tower or Treatment Pathway See online e-modules for further details

95 Call out: Performance Measurement
How good are we at measuring the effectiveness of current Strategies? How good are we at assessing effectiveness of Activities 95

96 Agenda Session 1 Introduction & overview of Brand Planning process 2
Recommended slides 3 Strategic Foundation & Market Access 4 Situation Scan & Opportunities 5 Adopting Strategies 6 Operational Planning: Defining LOC Activities 7 Defining Performance Measures 8 Next Steps 96

97 Exercise: Plan your next steps
In Brand Groups, discuss the implications of Brand Planning for your team, for example: How & when to do the Situation Scan. Pre-work required What “Deep Dives” might be required Division of responsibilities: Commercial vs. Medical How to get Sales input to Strategy Plan and Operating Plan How to strengthen Digital component of Operating Plan 30 mins 97

98 Available support The CCoE can support the Brand Planning process with the following materials via the Marketing Excellence intranet site: Workshop slides Brand Planning overview slides LOC Operational Plan slides Operational Planning e-module CSI Tool and supporting material Please see the Brand Planning or Marketing Excellence Champion for further support 98 98 98

99 Have we met objectives & expectations?
Our objectives To provide an overview of key changes in the Brand Planning process, and reinforcement of key points (for those who did it last year) To provide familiarisation with the process (for those new to GSK Brand Planning) Your expectations What are your expectations? Facilitator notes: Refer back to whatever was captured about expectations on flipchart at beginning of workshop 99

100 Finally... Questions? Comments? Issues?

101 Who will participate? PM KAM MAccess managers MAdvisors BDir Gorazd Boštjan Sonja Bukovec Turk SM

102 How long? 3 houres WHICH TOPICS REQUIRE MOST ATTENTIONS? Cross functional team work Background of split marketing & medical responsibilities Responsibilities equaly devided between marketing & medical KPIs for medical Differencies from 2011 Marketing: - Situation scan & deep dive , Chanel selection Non interventiona studies

103 Slides/Posters/Workshops
Mateja - uvod 10 min Marketing - Sonja (What changed, 8 recommanded templatov) Medical - Jani

104 Additional materials Posterji (Nejc) – že kontaktirani
Template – razposlati z vabilom – Mateja pošlje invitation in vabilo Datum: :30 – 11:30


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