Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

UV (Ultraviolet) Rays By Rachel Bass, Ian Lund, and Jackson Wells.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "UV (Ultraviolet) Rays By Rachel Bass, Ian Lund, and Jackson Wells."— Presentation transcript:

1 UV (Ultraviolet) Rays By Rachel Bass, Ian Lund, and Jackson Wells

2 CLASSY FACTS ABOUT UV RAYS UV Rays have wavelengths between 4x10 -7 meters and 7x10 -7 meters UV Rays have a frequency between hertz and Hertz UV Rays are between Visible Light and X-Rays on the Electromagnetic Spectrum UV Rays have wavelengths between 4x10 -7 meters and 7x10 -7 meters UV Rays have a frequency between hertz and Hertz UV Rays are between Visible Light and X-Rays on the Electromagnetic Spectrum

3 THE CLASSY DISCOVERY OF UV RAYS Johann Willhelm Ritter of Poland discovered UV Rays in 1801 After hearing that when Silver Chloride is exposed to blue light there is a greater reaction than when it is exposed to red light, Ritter experimented with the substance by directing sunlight with a glass prism and created a spectrum reflecting on the Silver Chloride. The substance was increasingly darker as it moved from the red light to the violet. This showed that violet light makes the Chloride turn black faster. Out of curiosity, Ritter moved the Silver Chloride beyond the violet light and there was an intense reaction From this he discovered this form of invisible light beyond the end of the spectrum that is now called UV Light. Johann Willhelm Ritter of Poland discovered UV Rays in 1801 After hearing that when Silver Chloride is exposed to blue light there is a greater reaction than when it is exposed to red light, Ritter experimented with the substance by directing sunlight with a glass prism and created a spectrum reflecting on the Silver Chloride. The substance was increasingly darker as it moved from the red light to the violet. This showed that violet light makes the Chloride turn black faster. Out of curiosity, Ritter moved the Silver Chloride beyond the violet light and there was an intense reaction From this he discovered this form of invisible light beyond the end of the spectrum that is now called UV Light.

4 CLASSY USES FOR UV RAYS Ultraviolet Rays come from the sun There are 3 types of UV Rays UV-A (the weakest waves that reach earth) UV-B (only some of these waves reach earth) UV-C (the strongest waves that never reach earth) UV-C Rays can be man made and are used in hospitals to treat some skin disorders and kill germs on surgical tools Scientists use UV Rays to discover what chemicals make up objects by observing the rays that the objects give off Ultraviolet Rays come from the sun There are 3 types of UV Rays UV-A (the weakest waves that reach earth) UV-B (only some of these waves reach earth) UV-C (the strongest waves that never reach earth) UV-C Rays can be man made and are used in hospitals to treat some skin disorders and kill germs on surgical tools Scientists use UV Rays to discover what chemicals make up objects by observing the rays that the objects give off

5 WHEN UV RAYS MEET SKIN When UV Rays touch skin, people produce more Vitamin D But too much sun is bad for you, and causes your skin to burn The best way to protect yourself is to use sunscreen before going out, SPF 30 or above When UV Rays touch skin, people produce more Vitamin D But too much sun is bad for you, and causes your skin to burn The best way to protect yourself is to use sunscreen before going out, SPF 30 or above

6 SKIN CANCER With too much exposure to UV Rays, people can develop skin cancer UV Rays give molecules so much energy that instead of making them shake like what is natural, they shake so much that they cause the molecules to split This changes the chemical structure of the molecule By doing this, living organisms can develop cell damage and deformities by mutating the genetic code With too much exposure to UV Rays, people can develop skin cancer UV Rays give molecules so much energy that instead of making them shake like what is natural, they shake so much that they cause the molecules to split This changes the chemical structure of the molecule By doing this, living organisms can develop cell damage and deformities by mutating the genetic code

7 EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGANISMS Humans cannot see UV Rays But other insects, like bees can Bees use the UV Rays to see its reflection off flowers, to see where to get pollen Humans cannot see UV Rays But other insects, like bees can Bees use the UV Rays to see its reflection off flowers, to see where to get pollen

8 The End

9 BIBLIOGRAPHY "Ritter Discovers Ultraviolet Light." Web. 09 May "Students Guide-Ultraviolet Radiation." Web. 09 May "Ultraviolet Radiation." Britannica Online. Web. 10 May "Ultraviolet Radiation." Web. 10 May "UV Rays." Vol. 11. Chicago: Scott Fetzer Company, Print. Viegas, Jennifer. The Role of the Sun in Our Solar System: an Anthology of Current Thought. New York: Rosen Pub. Group, Print. "Ritter Discovers Ultraviolet Light." Web. 09 May "Students Guide-Ultraviolet Radiation." Web. 09 May "Ultraviolet Radiation." Britannica Online. Web. 10 May "Ultraviolet Radiation." Web. 10 May "UV Rays." Vol. 11. Chicago: Scott Fetzer Company, Print. Viegas, Jennifer. The Role of the Sun in Our Solar System: an Anthology of Current Thought. New York: Rosen Pub. Group, Print.


Download ppt "UV (Ultraviolet) Rays By Rachel Bass, Ian Lund, and Jackson Wells."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google