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Workforce and Employer Needs: A Collaborative Solution Andrew Comrie ELRAH Director Barbara Lawson Head of External Liaison Edinburgh’s Telford College.

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Presentation on theme: "Workforce and Employer Needs: A Collaborative Solution Andrew Comrie ELRAH Director Barbara Lawson Head of External Liaison Edinburgh’s Telford College."— Presentation transcript:

1 Workforce and Employer Needs: A Collaborative Solution Andrew Comrie ELRAH Director Barbara Lawson Head of External Liaison Edinburgh’s Telford College Prof Morag Gray Academic Lead BA (Hons) Youth Work Edinburgh’s Telford College Janis Deane BA (Hons) Youth Work Programme Leader Edinburgh Napier University THE PRESENTING TEAM

2 Part 1: Introduction ELRAH Director

3 Delegate Questions Presentation Structure Introduction Background to the Youth Work Programme Designing the Youth Work Programme Delivering the Youth Work Programme Sum Up

4 A Changing Post-16 Education Landscape September Scottish Government published their pre- legislative White Paper, “ Putting Learners at the Centre: Delivering our Ambitions for Post-16 Education in Scotland” Focus on workforce skills development. Regional Planning (driven by regional labour market needs). Collaborative curriculum design and delivery (HEI, Colleges and Employers working more closely in partnership to design and deliver programmes). No loss of time for learners (especially those moving to degree study having studied HE level programmes in a Scottish College). New “partnership models” for delivering HE in Scotland.

5 Helping with the Challenge of Designing Work-based Programmes JISC Work-Based Learning Maturity Toolkit: used to inform and evaluate the design and delivery of the Youth Work Programme. Partnership development funded by JISC, led by University of Bradford in collaboration with University of Westminster, University of Wales Institute Cardiff and Middlesex University and ELRAH.

6 Poll Question 1

7 Part 2: Background to the Youth Work Programme Barbara Lawson Head of External Liaison Edinburgh’s Telford College

8 Background Youth Work Programme New Youth Work Programme developed to illustrate an alternative, collaborative way of delivering HE which is more flexible and responsive to local employer need. Articulation is designed in – students can enter at advanced levels of the programme depending on prior qualifications and experience - this was a key aspect for the employer.

9 Edinburgh City Council ELRAH Edinburgh Napier University Edinburgh’s Telford College Skills for Scotland Scottish Qualifications Credit Framework Our Successful Partnership Successful Partnership Working

10 PUBLIC SECTOR EMPLOYER ENGAGEMENT Youth Work Degree Christine Mackay CLD Manager Gavin Crosby Youth Work Strategy Implementation Manager Sue Bruce CEO Edinburgh Council

11 Sue Bruce – Chief Executive, City of Edinburgh Council

12 “By working in partnership we have made best use of our resources and produced a very cost effective course, grounded in practice and accessible to a group of staff who now have the opportunity to access this excellent professional training.”

13 Christine Mackay – Edinburgh City Council Community Learning and Development (CLD) Manager

14 “The development of the work-based Youth Work Degree has been an important development for us. Working with Edinburgh Napier University and Edinburgh’s Telford has been a very positive experience – our secondment of an experienced youth worker to the qualification design team has ensured that the content reflects the needs of the field and core competencies which was invaluable for us and great professional development for her. Developing this qualification has helped us ensure we train work-based assessors who will be evidencing those competences and this has been really worthwhile”

15 Gavin Crosby – Edinburgh City Council Youth Work Strategy Implementation Manager

16 Question time

17 Part 3: Designing the Youth Work Programme Prof. Morag Gray Academic Lead, BA Youth Work Edinburgh’s Telford College

18 Collaborative Development of Programme Learning gap expressed by Edinburgh City Council ELRAH Scoping Partnership working and early agreement Detailed Planning document Planning Team: Experienced curriculum developer & seconded subject expert Regular progress meetings Programme Team Existing Approved Foundation Degree Framework CLD competencies & National Occupational Standards for Youth Work Employer Expert Team Potential Students Module Content Stage alignment and integrity Delivery and assessment strategies Collaborative programme Documentation Cohesive team reflecting partnership ‘defended’ programme Commended by validation panel for obvious close working relationships Plan Design Build Test Validation Sept 2010 May 2011 Start September 2011

19 Programme Structure 1 year 3 months 6 months 9 months 1 Year Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4

20 This course is perfect for me otherwise I would have to leave my job. What would I do if I failed the course? I would have no job.

21 Question time

22 Part 4: Delivering the Youth Work Programme Janis Deane Programme Leader Edinburgh Napier University

23 Delivering the Youth Work Programme Community of practice and peer support Blended learning and the constructivist delivery model E-learning and the 3 major components of the online environment: activities, resources and supports (Oliver & Herrington 2001)

24 Delivering the Youth Work Programme: Pre-entry and induction

25 Delivering the Youth Work Programme: Blended and online learning

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27 Delivering the Youth Work Programme: Student voice

28 Delivering the Youth Work Programme: E-learning Moule’s E-learning ladder (page 41 at the link below) offered a conceptual model for planning e-learning approaches across the programme. Moule, P. (2007) Challenging the 5 stage model for e- learning: a new approach ALT-J Research in Learning Technology 15 (1) pp37-50 [internet] available at Vol15_No1_2007_Challenging_the_five-stage_mod.pdf Vol15_No1_2007_Challenging_the_five-stage_mod.pdf

29 Delivering the Youth Work Programme: Example of online learning activity Discussion posting 2 – Critical Incident Analysis # Look back at the Unit 1 week 2 reflection material and the reflective models reading in particular. # Using a model of reflection of your choice, undertake a critical incident analysis of a situation or event at work or in your personal life. This can be a small but significant event and need not be a crisis or even negative. Be careful with confidential information e.g. clients’ or colleague’s names! # Write this up as a 300 word (maximum) discussion posting and make at least 2 responses to other students of 50 words total. This is worth10% of the module mark and due in week 7.

30 Delivering the Youth Work Programme; brief extract from online discussion posting Subject: Discussion Posting 2 - Critical Incident Analysis Topic: Online Discussion 2 Deadline 12 Noon Author: xxxxxxx Date: 20 October :02 PM On researching different models of reflection, I have decided to complete a critical incident analysis using The Reflective Cycle (Gibbs G, 1988, Learning By Doing). I deliver a substance awareness session to a capacity building group as part of their twelve week programme, a few groups ago they asked if we would be interested in allowing a young person to complete their work placement in We decided to have her placement as part of my project and that I would supervise her.

31 Delivering the Youth Work Programme: Grading criteria for on-line discussions Description and points out of 10 0 No posts, non-participation by student or merely repeats other people’s contributions or not addressing the topic/question. 1-3 Participates in a limited way, with relevant material but which has limited analysis or engagement of fellow-students. Posts but does not respond to peers or uses social/informal style with slang/text language. 4-7 Participates with relevant contributions showing critical thought based on literature use. Trying to engage with fellow-students but could be stronger Consistently enthusiastic and rigorous participation by student. Responsive engagement with material and with fellow-students. Evidence of critical thought based on a literature use to demonstrate new insights or synthesis of innovative ideas. Marker’s comments 10/10 Excellent posting in both content and style and use of the Gibbs reflective cycle to add structure. 6 positive responses to others. Obvious learning with forward planning. Any further questions, please get back to me. Janis

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33 Question time

34 Summing Up An Effective, Collaborative Partnership – employer actively involved from the start inputting to the design as well as development and delivery. A Work-based undergraduate programme developed and validated in 8 months. A flexible programme – designed to meet industry needs with multiple entry and exit points Learners able to accelerate learning by getting maximum credit for prior qualifications (including work-based qualifications) and prior experience. Technology enabled to support remote learning, peer learning and mixed model of learner support from both College, HEI and Employers

35 ONLINE DISCUSSION Please join us now in the online discussion area where we will be delighted to answer any further questions you may have. As a starter for ten: Are you experiencing similar changes to post-16 education where you come from? What will this mean for future delivery models of your programmes?

36 Contact for Further Information Andrew Comrie ELRAH Website:


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