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Overview of Thinking Maps ® Local District 1 Elementary Principals’ Meeting February 11, 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Overview of Thinking Maps ® Local District 1 Elementary Principals’ Meeting February 11, 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Overview of Thinking Maps ® Local District 1 Elementary Principals’ Meeting February 11, 2009

2 You have been introduced to Thinking Maps ® You can name the key points defining Thinking Maps ® You can identify the thought process behind each Thinking Map and the Frame of Reference You can draw and define each map You have a beginning understanding of how to use the maps in a variety of curriculum areas You can explain the similarities and differences between Graphic Organizers and Thinking Maps ® Page 1 Chapter 1

3 What are Thinking Maps and how are they different from Graphic Organizers? Use a Circle Map to define Thinking Maps. Page 2

4 80% of all information that comes into our brain is VISUAL 40% of all nerve fibers connected to the brain are linked to the retina 36,000 visual messages per hour may be registered by the eyes. - Eric Jensen, Brain Based Learning Page 3

5 Knowledge is stored in two forms: Research proves that the more we use both systems of representation, the better we are able to think and recall knowledge. DUAL CODING THEORY Linguistic Form Nonlinguistic Form Page 3

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7 SCAFFOLDING

8 Page 7 The Thinking Maps give students a concrete visual pattern for an abstract cognitive skill.

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11 Thought process: Sequencing When do you use sequencing in: READING? SOCIAL STUDIES? SCIENCE? MATH? In every instance, you could use a WRITING? FLOW MAP THE ARTS? Page 10

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13 Reading Identify and explain story elements, including plot summary. Retell a story. WHICH MAP WOULD YOU USE? The Flow Map

14 Science Investigate, compare, and contrast the different life cycles of different living things. WHICH MAP WOULD YOU USE? The Double Bubble Map

15 Social Studies List the qualities of a leader WHICH MAP WOULD YOU USE? The Bubble Map

16 Math Explain the relationship among fractions, decimals, and percents; translate among various representations of equal numbers WHICH MAP WOULD YOU USE? The Bridge Map

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18 4 TH Grade Special Education Class

19 Middle School Social Studies

20 Page 11 High School English

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22 SET

23 TEACHER / STUDENT INPUT SET Page 13 Page 14

24 PROCESSING Page 14

25 EXTENSION Page 15

26 CLOSURE Page 15

27 So how are Thinking Maps different from graphic organizers? Page 16 t

28 Processing Activity 1.Put away your notes. Then work with your group to define Thinking Maps. 2.Use a Circle Map to collect your ideas. 3.Include any notes that you remember about what they are and why they work as tools for thinking. 4.Also include information about how Thinking Maps are different from graphic organizers. Page 17

29 An Overview of all 8 Thinking Maps Page 18 The Circle Map Defining in Context

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37 ? sideburns scarves Cadillac May still be alive

38 Abolitionist Physical Change Definition (in own words) Characteristics Examples A change in size, shape, or state of matter New materials are NOT formed Ice melting Breaking a glass Cutting hair Same matter present before and after change

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44 An Overview of all 8 Thinking Maps Page 19 Seeing Analogies The Bridge Map

45 DRAWING THE MAP THE BRIDGE MAP Page 66

46 KEY INFORMATION The Bridge Map helps students identify the relationships between words. As long as the relationship remains the same, the Bridge Map can be extended beyond 2 pairs of words. Page 68 An apple is a type of fruit as a carrot is a type of vegetable.

47 AS Head Body Numerator Relating Factor: _________________ Fraction Is the top part of...

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52 Comes before A B C D THE “FAT” BRIDGE

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54 An Overview of all 8 Thinking Maps Page 18 The Bubble Map Describing

55 NOTE MAKING GUIDE For the BUBBLE MAP Descriptors can be sensory, comparative, emotional or aesthetic. Adjectives and adjective phrases only. Great for vocabulary development (vivid word choice) and inferential thinking. Focus on adjectives. One strategy is to keep a “Circle on the Side.” Notes: Page 35

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59 An Overview of all 8 Thinking Maps Page 18 The Double Bubble Map Comparing and Contrasting

60 Page 41 NOTE MAKING GUIDE For the DOUBLE BUBBLE MAP How are these two things similar and different? Why are these similarities and differences important? What have you learned by constructing this map? Helps students compare and contrast any ideas, people, cultures, concepts, things they are studying. Because of the depth of thought, students may need to create two Circle Maps, two Bubble Maps, etc before making the Double Bubble Map. The Double Bubble Map can be used in place of the Venn Diagram, especially when focusing on the differences between two things. The Venn Diagram should continue to be used in math for set theory. Notes:

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63 Comparing enhances meaning

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71 An Overview of all 8 Thinking Maps Page 18 Classifying The Tree Map

72 Page 47 NOTE MAKING GUIDE For the TREE MAP How would you group this information? What are the ideas and details that support your main idea? The Tree Map helps students classify information based on similar qualities, attributes, or details. They can be developed inductively or deductively. Notes:

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77 Great for Assessment!

78 A “Growing” Tree Map

79 Equivalent Representations % 0 1

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81 An Overview of all 8 Thinking Maps Page 19 Whole to Parts The Brace Map

82 Page 53 NOTE MAKING GUIDE For the BRACE MAP What is the name of the whole object? What are the major physical parts of the object? What sources did you use to identify the whole and its parts? The Brace Map is for the structural analysis of a concrete object. These maps almost always use nouns to name the parts of an object. The Brace Map is often confused with a Tree Map. Remember that the Brace Map identifies “parts of” something. The Tree Map identifies “kinds of” things. Notes:

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87 Enhance transfer: Part to Whole

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89 To show my thinking about groups of 10 To illustrate my strategy for adding Break down numbers to simplify additions Expanded notation helps with computation

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92 An Overview of all 8 Thinking Maps Page 19 Sequencing The Flow Map

93 Page 59 NOTE MAKING GUIDE For the FLOW MAP What is the name of the event or sequence? What are the stages of each event? What prior knowledge and/or experiences influence your understanding about this processes or series of events? A Flow Map can be used to show sequences, steps, comparisons or degrees. The Flow Map can be drawn from left to right, in a cycle, or in a rising and falling action form as long as each box is connected to another using an arrow. The sub-stages in the Flow Map must also be in a sequence, not just a list of details. Notes:

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101 An Overview of all 8 Thinking Maps Page 19 The Multi-Flow Map Cause and Effect

102 Page 65 NOTE MAKING GUIDE CAUSE AND EFFECT Draw the Multi-Flow Map and label its parts. Name the thought process:

103 Page 65 NOTE MAKING GUIDE What are the causes and effects of this event? Where did you get your information? Did a specific time period influence the causes and/or effects? The Multi-Flow Map helps students identify the causes and effects of an event. When constructing the map, always focus first on the event. The causes and effects do not have to balance. Students may also construct a one- sided Multi-Flow. The event is the key to this map. It must be a “happening.” The event should be “the flooding of the Nile” instead of just “the Nile.” Notes:

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109 Adding a Frame of Reference How do you know what you know about this topic? Did your information come from a specific source? Is this information being influenced by a specific point of view? Who could use this information? Why is this information important? Page 20 An Overview of all 8 Thinking Maps

110 Adding a Frame of Reference Page 20

111 Adding a Frame of Reference Page 20

112 Page 73 NOTE MAKING GUIDE For the FRAME OF REFERENCE The Frame of Reference can be used around any map. Notes:

113 a.structural analysis, whole to part. components b. cause and effect, impact, outcomes c. see relationships, analogies d.compare and contrast, similarities and differences, uniqueness e. define in context, brainstorm f. sequence, order, steps in a process g. describe, name the qualities h. classify or sort, main idea and supporting details 1._____ Circle Map 2._____ Bubble Map 3._____ Double Bubble Map 4._____ Tree Map 5._____ Brace Map 6._____ Flow Map 7._____ Multi-Flow Map 8._____ Bridge Map Introduction: Self-Assessment #2 A F B C H D G E Page 294

114 Page 77 KEY WORDS FOR THINKING

115 1.Read the article 2.How many Thinking Maps can you create? 3. As a group, create your maps on chart paper. Be prepared to share. Hint: There are at least 5 maps that can be created. Now You Try…

116 BRACE MAP BUBBLE MAP FLOW MAP MULTI- FLOW MAP DOUBLE BUBBLE MAP Now You Try

117 REFLECTION Think-Pair-Share What will high quality implementation of Thinking Maps look like in classrooms?


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