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Shifting Your View of Instruction Through the Lens of the Common Core Laura A. Gonzalez.

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Presentation on theme: "Shifting Your View of Instruction Through the Lens of the Common Core Laura A. Gonzalez."— Presentation transcript:

1 Shifting Your View of Instruction Through the Lens of the Common Core Laura A. Gonzalez

2 Learning Outcomes Understand the instructional shifts in ELA for the Common Core State Standards. Participate in CCSS ELA Lesson Modules

3 Norms 3 Work collaboratively and draw on one another's strengths. Foster a positive learning environment for all. Use technology effectively.

4 Quiz, Quiz, Trade What do we know about the Common Core State Standards for ELA?

5 5 Supporting 21 st Century Skills Tulare County Office of Education C ritical Thinking: Reflection, analysis, synthesis about a concept or idea for the purpose of gaining new knowledge. C reativity: Generating new ideas to solve problems C ommunication: Exchanging information C ollaboration: Working together to accomplish a goal

6 What’s In and What’s Out? INOUT 1. Frequent encounters w/complex texts1. Leveled texts (only) 2. Texts worthy of close attention2. Reading any ‘ol text 3. Balance of literary and Info texts3. Solely literature 4. Coherent sequences of texts4. Collection of unrelated texts 5. Mostly text-dependent questions5. Mostly text-to-self questions 6. Mainly evidence-based analyses6. Mainly writing without sources 7. Accent on academic vocabulary7. Accent on literary terminology 8. Emphasis on reading & re-reading8. Emphasis on pre-reading 9. Reading strategies (as means)9. Reading strategies (as end goal) 10. Reading foundations (central and integrated) 10. Reading foundations (peripheral and detached) Susan Pimentel, 2012

7 Instead of Write a persuasive letter to your parents on why you should have a pet. Describe the events that led to the American Revolution. Ask students to Explain why a particular animal makes the best pet. Justify why the American Revolution was necessary. vs. Instructional Examples 7 Susan Pimentel, 2012www.achievethecore.org

8 The Shifts Build Toward College and Career Readiness for All Students

9 Literacy Across Disciplines CCSS does not just pertain to ELA but literacy across the disciplines of science, social studies, and technical subjects too.

10 Red Flag/Green Flags Teach reading & writing in all content areas (SS, science, etc.) Students write frequently about what they are reading and learning Multiple texts Primary sources Teacher presents what is in text, rather than students reading it Text used as a reference rather than source of information No connection between reading & writing assignments A single text used Red Flags Green Flags

11 Standards require certain percentages of literature and informational texts (modeled on NAEP) Grade Literary Informational 4 50% 8 45% 55% 12 30% 70% Literature and Informational Texts

12 Standards call for regular short research projects Research “Among the highest priorities of the Common Core Standards is that students can read closely and gain knowledge from texts.”

13 Example from the Classroom How are students building strong content knowledge? What 21 st Century Skills are the students using? What habits of mind are the students developing?

14 Process Literacy Across Disciplines Informational Text Research

15 Processing the ELA Shifts Discuss What implication does this shift have on classroom instruction? 15

16 Citing Evidence Focus on students rigorously citing evidence from texts to support claims/inferences (Reading 1)

17 Red Flag/Green Flags Rich/Rigorous conversations based on text Students utilize information from text in their answers Questions ask students to make inferences from evidence in text Questions can be answered without reading text Questions are centered on students’ own experience Students do not have to make connections to answer questions Red FlagsGreen Flags

18 Observe this picture quietly. What has changed and what has stayed the same?

19 Academic Talk Require purposeful academic talk (Speaking & Listening 1) “Among the highest priorities of the Common Core Standards is that students can read closely and gain knowledge from texts.”

20 CCSS Emphasis in Writing

21 Writing to Sources Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical (RI.3) Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.(RI.9) Write informative/ explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points, and provide a concluding statement or section (W.2)

22 Writing to Sources Require writing to sources rather than writing to de-contextualized expository prompts (Writing 9) Write a newspaper article defending why we should protect the owls in our environment.

23 Process Citing Evidence Academic Talk Writing to Sources

24 Processing the ELA Shifts Discuss What implication does this shift have on classroom instruction? 24

25 Engage with Complex Text Text Complexity Beginning of Year End of Year Toward CCR Text at Low End of Grade Band Text Between Low End and Middle of Grade Band Text Near Middle of Grade Band Text Between Middle and High End of Grade Band Text at High End of Grade Band Susan Pimentel, What students can read, in terms of complexity, is the greatest predictor of success in college.

26 Red Flag/Green Flags All students engage in same text Appropriate scaffolding Students are required to think critically about the text Multiple text structures Students always use leveled text Students are given a summary of text prior to reading No support offered for below grade level readers Single text structure Red Flags Green Flags

27 Engage with Complex Text Standards reward careful, close reading rather than racing through texts Highly focused pre-reading activities (no more than 10% of time spent reading) Close Reading of Text 27 Susan Pimentel, 2012

28 Example from the Classroom Mr. Michaud mentions show and tell themes. How does this structure provide for more equitable discussions? How do the worksheet and Mr. Michaud's questioning provide scaffolding for student presentations? What other learning goals are addressed during this sharing time? How are students using academic vocabulary? Tulare County Office of Educationhttps://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/show-and-tell-themes

29 Example from the Classroom Teaching Channel – Poetry Workstations How do the "guiding reflection questions" support students' thinking? What skills are students practicing as they create their podcast? How did the class blog contribute to collaboration among students? Common Core Standards ELA.RL.6.4, ELA.RL.6.7, ELA.SL.6.5

30 Close Reading Let’s practice! 1 st read- Listen to the passage read aloud 2 nd read- Take notes from the text read aloud 3 rd step- Compare your notes with the notes that your partner took 4 th step- Re-create the text with your partner Compare

31 Take a Closer Look R.7 W.6, W.8 SL.2, SL.4, SL.5 Examine the following standards for your grade level. How are they related?

32 Text Dependent Questions “A text dependent question specifically asks a question that can only be answered by referring explicitly back to the text being read” -

33 3 Types of Text- Dependent Questions Questions that assess themes and central ideas Questions that assess knowledge of vocabulary Questions that assess syntax and structure 33

34 Non-Examples and Examples 34 In “Casey at the Bat,” Casey strikes out. Describe a time when you failed at something. In “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” Dr. King discusses nonviolent protest. Discuss, in writing, a time when you wanted to fight against something that you felt was unfair. In “The Gettysburg Address” Lincoln says the nation is dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Why is equality an important value to promote? What makes Casey’s experiences at bat humorous? What can you infer from King’s letter about the letter that he received? “The Gettysburg Address” mentions the year According to Lincoln’s speech, why is this year significant to the events described in the speech? Not Text-DependentText-Dependent

35 “Close Reading” of a Stand-Alone Text

36 © 2012 The Aspen Institute

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38 A systematic approach to creating text- dependent questions for complex texts while aligning them with the demands of the CCSS. Tools for Creating Text-Dependent Questions: Text-Dependent Question Worksheet © 2012 The Aspen Institute

39 Activity Activity Read the opening of Brian Lies’ Bats at the Beach With a partner, write one Text-Dependent Question for each stanza aligned to a CCSS anchor standard Share your question with others at your table Evaluate your TDQ based on the samples provided

40 Process Text Complexity Close Reading Academic Language

41 Standards focus on the words that matter most—not obscure vocabulary but the academic language that pervades complex texts. Academic Language

42 Vocabulary Which words should be taught? Essential to understanding text Likely to appear in future reading Which words should get more time and attention? More abstract words (as opposed to concrete words) persist vs. checkpoint noticed vs. accident Words which are part of semantic word family secure, securely, security, secured 42

43 Source: Tulare County Office of Education

44 Three Tiers of Vocabulary Instruction Source: ELA CCSS Appendix A;

45 Tier One These words are the words of everyday speech While important they are not the focus Usually not considered a challenge, but English Learners will need to attend to them 45 dog house school food Source: ELA CCSS Appendix A;

46 Tier Three Domain-specific words specific to a domain or field of study Are key to understanding a new concept within text Are specific Have close ties to content knowledge Are far more common in in informational text than in literary text Recognized as new and hard words Are explicitly defined by the author, repeatedly used, and heavily scaffolded (e.g., made a part of a glossary) 46 moleculegenerationstalactite literary analysis Source: ELA CCSS Appendix A;

47 Tier Two General Academic Words Are far more likely to appear in written form than in speech They appear in all sorts of texts: informational, technical, and literary Often represent subtle or precise to say relatively simple things (saunter instead of walk) They are highly generalizable 47 inference summarize analyze compare similar Source: ELA CCSS Appendix A;

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49 Identify & Classify Tiered Vocabulary in Context Source: ELA CCSS Appendix A;

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51 from CCSS Appendix A pages 34-35

52 Processing the ELA Shifts Discuss What implication does this shift have on classroom instruction? 52

53 53 Tulare County Office of Education C ritical Thinking: Reflection, analysis, synthesis about a concept or idea for the purpose of gaining new knowledge. C reativity: Generating new ideas to solve problems C ommunication: Exchanging information C ollaboration: Working together to accomplish a goal

54 Review

55 Sample Lesson Module “Nail Soup”– Close Reading and Inquiry

56 Nail Soup What part of the story did you find most interesting? Pair Share

57 Focus Question According to the story, who is more dishonest, the soldier or the old woman? Circle words or passages that help answer the question. Write your answer.

58 Incorporate The Use Of Language Frames Partner A - I believe ______ is more dishonest than ______ because ___________________. Partner B- (if you agree) I likewise agree that ______ is more dishonest than ______ and I’ll add __________________. (if you disagree) I disagree. I believe ______ is more dishonest than ______ because ___________________.

59 Round Table-Round Robin Discuss your answer with your partners. Come to consensus. Be ready to report out.

60 Your turn Think of an upcoming story or topic How can you incorporate text dependent questions?

61 Opinion/Argument Writing Read Writing Standard one for your grade level ELA continuum p. 4

62 Writing CCR Standard #1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

63

64 Examples from the Classroom Opinion Writing – Grade 2 How did Miss Patterson engage her students in authentic inquiry? In what ways did student interest contribute to the engagement of all students. How did this activity prepare students for writing?

65 Example from the Classroom Brainstorming https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/analyzing-text-brainstorming How does Ms. Brewer tailor this lesson to the needs of English Language Learners? What kinds of questions does Ms. Brewer ask to guide her students' discussions? How does this activity prepare students for writing?

66 Example from the Classroom Text Talk Time https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/analyzing-text-as-a-group What routines does Ms. Brewer have in place to help discussion run smoothly? Notice the questions Ms. Brewer asks her class. What makes these questions rich? Why is it beneficial to engage students in both small and large group discussions before writing?

67 Example from the Classroom Text Analysis in Writing What structures does Ms. Brewer have in place to allow for effective differentiation? The class spent a lot of time talking before writing. What effect did this have? When Ms. Brewer works with the small group, how does she support English Language Learners? https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/analyzing-text-writing

68 Brewer Video Triad Process Application Planning

69 21 st Century Skills Where Did We Communicate?

70 21 st Century Skills Where Did We Collaborate?

71 21 st Century Skills Where Did We Critically Think?

72 21 st Century Skills Where Did We Create?

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