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Active Healthy Kids Canada is a national charitable organization established in 1994 that works to power the movement to get kids moving ™ Provides strategic.

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Presentation on theme: "Active Healthy Kids Canada is a national charitable organization established in 1994 that works to power the movement to get kids moving ™ Provides strategic."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Active Healthy Kids Canada is a national charitable organization established in 1994 that works to power the movement to get kids moving ™ Provides strategic national leadership – advancing knowledge, evidence- informed communication and advocacy strategies – to influence issue stakeholders who affect physical activity opportunities for children and youth The primary vehicle to achieve this mandate is the Active Healthy Kids Canada Report Card on Physical Activity for Children and Youth and its related activities 2 About Us

3 3 The Report Card, now in its ninth year of production, is an evidence-informed communications and advocacy piece designed to provide insight into Canada’s “state of the nation” each year on how, as a country, we are being responsible in providing physical activity opportunities for children and youth. Our model has been replicated in other jurisdictions around the world including Kenya, South Africa, Mexico and Louisiana. Report Card

4 Report Card Indicators and Grades The 2013 Report Card assigns letter grades to 17 different indicators grouped into three categories. Grades are based on an examination of current data against a benchmark along with an assessment of trends over time, international comparisons and the presence of disparities. Together, the indicators provide a robust and comprehensive assessment of physical activity of Canadian children and youth 4

5 5 Grade assignments are determined based on examination of the current data and literature for each indicator against a benchmark or optimal scenario, assessing the indicator to be poor, adequate, good or excellent: A = We are succeeding with a large majority of children and youth. B = We are succeeding with well over half of children and youth. C = We are succeeding with about half of children and youth. D = We are succeeding with less than half, but some, children and youth. F = We are succeeding with very few children and youth. Methodology

6 6 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) Canadian Physical Activity Levels Among Youth Survey (CANPLAY; CFLRI) Health Behaviour of School-aged Children Survey (HBSC) Healthy Living Habits Study (HLHS) Keeping Pace Opportunities for Physical Activity at School Survey (CFLRI) Physical Activity Monitor (PAM; CFLRI) Quebec en Forme School Health Action Planning and Evaluation System – Prince Edward Island (SHAPES-PEI) Youth Smoking Survey (YSS ) 2013 Key Data Sources In addition, the long form Report Card includes a comprehensive set of references and a variety of specific recommendations in each section and can be accessed at

7 7 Federal Government Strategies & Investments

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10 56% of Canadian parents are aware of the Children’s Fitness Tax Credit (CFTC) Federal Government Strategies & Investments

11 The federal government should develop an action plan based on the recommendations within Active Canada 20/20 and provide financial support for implementation. The federal government should continue to increase the priority of physical activity across several government departments including sport, health, transportation, and environment. The federal government should continue to provide communities with financial resources to invest in infrastructure that supports active transportation. It should also ensure the eligibility of infrastructure that supports active transportation within the New Long-Term Infrastructure Plan as suggested by a national active transportation coalition. The federal government should invest 2% of the $200 billion spent on health care annually in Canada to increase its investment in the promotion of physical activity, recreation and sport because of demonstrated positive effects on reducing healthcare costs.145 Recommendations Federal Government Strategies & Investments

12 There is a need for more evaluation of physical activity policies. There is a need for clear budgeting and accounting in order to better understand investments related to physical activity. 12 Federal Government Strategies & Investments Research Gaps

13 Provincial/Territorial Government Strategies & Investments Benchmarks Evidence of leadership and commitment in providing physical activity opportunities for all children and youth. Allocated funds and resources for the implementation of physical activity promotion strategies and initiatives for all children and youth. Demonstrated progress through the key stages of public policy making (i.e., policy agenda, policy formation, policy adoption, policy implementation, policy evaluation and decisions about the future) Grade C Provincial/Territorial Government Strategies & Investments

14 The future development of after-school programming that involves physical activity is a major priority in 8 of 13 (62%) provincial/territorial jurisdictions in Canada.153 The median after-school programming expenditure per capita for 5- to 14-year- olds across 9 Canadian provinces and territories is $12.85; it ranges from $ (Northwest Territories) to $0.59 (New Brunswick) (Figure 20).153, of 13 (54%) provincial/territorial jurisdictions in Canada have adopted a formal policy to increase afterschool programming that involves physical activity Provincial/Territorial Government Strategies & Investments Key Findings

15 15 Provincial/Territorial Government Strategies & Investments

16 6 of 13 (46%) provincial/territorial jurisdictions in Canada have implemented a fitness tax credit for children and youth 16 Provincial/Territorial Government Strategies & Investments Key Findings

17 Provincial/territorial governments should develop action plans based on the recommendations within Active Canada 20/20. Governments should intentionally address people with the greatest need and access issues by targeting policies to eliminate disparities in participation levels There is a need to keep working on coordinated alignment and collaboration both within and across jurisdictions in order to maximize resources to increase physical activity for children and youth. There is a need to invest in communications and implementation of policy initiatives so that those affected can work on the ground to support them and, with the public, help keep the momentum once the policy is adopted. Provincial/Territorial Government Strategies & Investments Recommendations

18 There is a need for more evaluation of physical activity policies. There is a need for clear budgeting and accounting in order to better understand investments related to physical activity. 18 Provincial/Territorial Government Strategies & Investments Research Gaps

19 Non-Government Strategies & Investments Benchmarks Evidence of leadership and commitment in providing physical activity opportunities for all children and youth. Allocated funds and resources for the implementation of physical activity promotion strategies and initiatives for all children and youth. Demonstrated progress through the key stages of public policy making (i.e., policy agenda, policy formation, policy adoption, policy implementation, policy evaluation and decisions about the future) Grade B+ Non-Government Strategies & Investments

20 Active Canada 20/20 continues to make steady progress toward policy adoption by stakeholders and federal/provincial/territorial governments. In June 2012, federal/provincial/territorial ministers responsible for amateur sport, physical activity and recreation pledged to examine the Active Canada 20/20 recommendations from the perspective of their own jurisdiction, and engage their physical activity stakeholder community with a view to advancing further action to increase health-enhancing physical activity. The Canadian Parks and Recreation Association is leading the development of a national recreation agenda that will refocus and strengthen the delivery of recreation in Canada beyond Canadian Sport For Life continues to progress through the key stages of public policy making, with implementation happening in all provinces/territories across Canada. 20 Key Findings Non-Government Strategies & Investments

21 21 Non-Government Strategies & Investments

22 Several private-sector organizations are providing funding to support the delivery of after-school programs and to reduce financial barriers to participate in sport. 22 Non-Government Strategies & Investments Key Findings

23 Non-government organizations, industry and philanthropic groups should maintain healthy active living as a priority area for funding as a fundamental contribution to healthy individuals, families, communities and overall society. There is a need for increased coordination to ensure alignment between emerging strategies and investments, and sustained progress toward improving the grade on future Report Cards. Community organizations from across all sectors should work together to develop policies that identify community assets for physical activities and maximize use of those assets through shared-use plans and agreements Non-Government Strategies & Investments Recommendations

24 There is a need for increased evaluation of nongovernment initiatives related to physical activity promotion. Evaluation efforts of non-government initiatives should focus on both process indicators such as partnership development and collaboration and outcome indicators such as contribution to increasing physical activity. 24 Non-Government Strategies & Investments Research Gaps

25 25 Thank you to…

26 26 Our Funders

27 27 The Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute provides leadership on scientific data collection and analysis and the content development process for the Report Card and related knowledge-exchange activities. ParticipACTION provides leadership on communications strategy, marketing, media and public relations support and provides Active Healthy Kids Canada with access to organizational infrastructure and administrative support. Strategic Partners

28 Research Work Group Dr. Mark Tremblay (Chief Scientific Officer) Dr. Rachel Colley (Chair and Scientific Officer) Joel Barnes (Research Manager and Lead Author) Mike Arthur (Department of Health and Wellness, Nova Scotia) Christine Cameron (Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute) Jean-Philippe Chaput (Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute) Guy Faulkner (University of Toronto) Ian Janssen (Queen’s University) Angela Kolen-Thompson (St. Francis Xavier University) Stephen Manske (Propel Centre for Population Health Impact, University of Waterloo) Art Salmon (Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, Ontario) John C. Spence (University of Alberta) Brian Timmons (McMaster University)

29 29 For more information

30 Join us! Go to for registration details!


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