Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Act I, scene i  When the play opens, Sampson and Gregory, two servants of the house of Capulet, are walking along the public streets armed with swords.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Act I, scene i  When the play opens, Sampson and Gregory, two servants of the house of Capulet, are walking along the public streets armed with swords."— Presentation transcript:

1 Act I, scene i  When the play opens, Sampson and Gregory, two servants of the house of Capulet, are walking along the public streets armed with swords and bucklers; later, the Lords of the Houses of Montague and Capulet enter their servants’ melee, although they never actually come to blows.  What kind of an atmosphere do these and other details convey to an attentive audience? Support your answer with evidence from the text.

2 Act I, scene ii  In this scene, Paris and Romeo are juxtaposed. Paris speaks to Lord Capulet, while Romeo speaks only to Capulet’s Servingman and to Benvolio.  Based upon the minimal characterization offered in this scene, compare and contrast Paris and Romeo. How are they alike and how are they different? Support your answer with evidence from the text.

3 Act I, scene iii  Juliet in this scene speaks with two matronly figures: her Nurse and Lady Capulet. These two older women apparently have very different personalities and relationships with Juliet, not to mention priorities and observable senses of social grace.  Compare and contrast the Nurse and Lady Capulet. How are they the same and how are they different? Support your answer with evidence from the text.

4 Act I, scene iv  In scene iv, we encounter Mercutio, one of the most successful scene-stealers in all of Shakespeare’s plays. Despite his apparent vulgarity and hysterical unpredictability- or perhaps because of them- many readers adore this character.  Based upon your first encounter with Mercutio, what is YOUR impression of the man and his personality?Support your answer with evidence from the text.

5 Act I, scene v  As demonstrated in scene v, not all members of the Capulet household are alike, especially regarding their varied responses to Romeo’s uninvited appearance at their feast. Consider all of the members of the Capulet household who actually recognize or interact with Romeo in this scene:  What do these distinct responses to, or interactions with him, imply about their personalities or priorities? Support your answer with evidence from the text.


Download ppt "Act I, scene i  When the play opens, Sampson and Gregory, two servants of the house of Capulet, are walking along the public streets armed with swords."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google