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Preparing Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors to Effectively Support and Assess Student Teacher Growth (A training opportunity to address.

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Presentation on theme: "Preparing Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors to Effectively Support and Assess Student Teacher Growth (A training opportunity to address."— Presentation transcript:

1 Preparing Cooperating Teachers and University Supervisors to Effectively Support and Assess Student Teacher Growth (A training opportunity to address 16 KAR 5:040 Section 2 (5,b) and Section 5 (6,b)) Greetings and welcome to this training session (read title as title slide is shown). My name is Sharon Brennan and I am pleased to have the opportunity to introduce this training session.

2 Part 1 Let me begin with a few points to get us started.
Part 1 Let me begin with a few points to get us started.  First, this training is designed to provide guidance for supervisors who work with student teachers across the state as mandated by the ESPB as part of 16 KAR 5:040. Our purpose in this training is to address Section 2 (5,b) and Section 5 (6,b).In the training we will address: Roles and responsibilities of the professional partners, seven strategies related to co-teaching based on a model developed by St. Cloud, MN which involves the cooperating teacher and student teacher planning, instructing and reflecting together throughout the student teaching experience. During the session we will also address the role of the Kentucky Teacher Standards, KTIP and the Kentucky Core Content Standards as they relate to supervision. It is important to note that this part (B) is one of three that addresses the EPSB regulation governing admission, placement and supervision in student teaching. Specifically, this part addresses: “Best Practice in supporting the student teacher” (16KAR 5:040). It is also important to note, that this training is one of three parts: Part a is presented by the EPSB which highlights “Basic Responsibilities of the Cooperating Teacher” (Section 2 – 5a) and “Basic Responsibilities of the University Supervisor” (Section 5 – 6a).  Instructions for completing Part a will be provided at the end of this training. Part c addresses “Effective assessment of the student teacher”. Part c will be presented as part of each individual university’s program orientations. In order to make engage you in the training, we will ask you to complete several tasks as we move forward. My fellow facilitators will provide guidance about when to pause the recording to complete each task. Be assured, though, that you can pause the recording at any time to reflect about the session and/or review materials as needed.

3 16 KAR 5:040: Admission, Placement & Supervision in Student Teaching
 Three part training required by EPSB Part a: from EPSB (instructions provided at end of this training) Part b: This training Part c: Conducted by university faculty prior to placement Let me begin with a few points to get us started.  First, this training is designed to provide guidance for supervisors who work with student teachers across the state as mandated by the ESPB as part of 16 KAR 5:040. Our purpose in this training is to address Section 2 (5,b) and Section 5 (6,b).In the training we will address: Roles and responsibilities of the professional partners, seven strategies related to co-teaching based on a model developed by St. Cloud, MN which involves the cooperating teacher and student teacher planning, instructing and reflecting together throughout the student teaching experience. During the session we will also address the role of the Kentucky Teacher Standards, KTIP and the Kentucky Core Content Standards as they relate to supervision. It is important to note that this part (B) is one of three that addresses the EPSB regulation governing admission, placement and supervision in student teaching. Specifically, this part addresses: “Best Practice in supporting the student teacher” (16KAR 5:040). It is also important to note, that this training is one of three parts: Part a is presented by the EPSB which highlights “Basic Responsibilities of the Cooperating Teacher” (Section 2 – 5a) and “Basic Responsibilities of the University Supervisor” (Section 5 – 6a).  Instructions for completing Part a will be provided at the end of this training. Part c addresses “Effective assessment of the student teacher”. Part c will be presented as part of each individual university’s program orientations. In order to make engage you in the training, we will ask you to complete several tasks as we move forward. My fellow facilitators will provide guidance about when to pause the recording to complete each task. Be assured, though, that you can pause the recording at any time to reflect about the session and/or review materials as needed.

4 Session Facilitators Sharon Brennan, University of Kentucky
Jennifer Christensen, Eastern Kentucky University Tim Crook, Asbury University Lori Henderson, Midway College Eve Proffitt, University of Kentucky I am pleased to have the opportunity now to introduce my fellow presenters. I am joined by members of the training design team including …

5 16 KAR 5:040 Section 2 (5, b) (5) Beginning September 1, 2013, prior to student teacher placement, a cooperating teacher shall receive training approved by the Education Professional Standards Board and provided at no cost to the cooperating teacher by the educator preparation institution which shall include the following components:       (a) Basic responsibilities of a cooperating teacher;       (b) Best practice in supporting the student teacher;       (c) Effective assessment of the student teacher.

6 16 KAR 5:040 Section 5 (6, b) (6) Beginning September 1, 2013, university supervisors shall receive training approved by the Education Professional Standards Board and provided at no cost to the university supervisor by the educator preparation institution which shall include the following components:       (a) Basic responsibilities of a university supervisor;       (b) Best practice in supporting the student teacher;       (c) Effective assessment of the student teacher.

7 EPSB Regulation 16 KAR 5:040, Sections 2 and 5
Now take a moment to review the entire EPSB regulation (16 KAR 5:040): Click here to view the entire regulation (16 KAR 5:040)

8 Key Terms: ST = Student Teacher CT = Cooperating Teacher
US = University Supervisor KTS = Kentucky Teacher Standards KTIP = Kentucky Teacher Internship Program CCC = Common Core Content PD = Professional Development PGP = Professional Growth Plan B = Benefits C = Cautions

9 Supervision=Supporting, Assessing, Mentoring

10 Supporting Assessing Mentoring
This training addresses: Responsibilities of ST, CT, US Support of ST Assessment of ST’s progress

11 Focus of Supervision Teacher effectiveness in relation to
student learning

12 Supporting Assessing Mentoring
Prepare for ST arrival Orient ST to class and school Launch co-teaching partnership Co-plan Co-teach Co-reflect Assess ST progress We begin by listing key tasks involved in effective supervision. Please link

13 Roles and Responsibilities
Student Teacher (ST) Cooperating Teacher (CT) University Supervisor (US) The primary roles of the professional partners for co-teaching in Kentucky are the student teacher who is student teaching, the cooperating teacher who is the P-12 teacher who supervises the student teacher and the university supervisor who represents the college/university and serves as a liaison between the cooperating teacher and the student teacher. The professional partners have responsibilities during the student teaching experience. The specifics for each professional partner’s roles and responsibilities should be located in the student teacher’s particular college/university education handbook. General responsibilities of each professional partner were identified by higher education professionals. The next slides will be individually targeted toward each professional partner and their roles and responsibilities.

14 Student Teacher Responsibilities
List three key responsibilities for the ST Please pause and take a moment to list the responsibilities you are able to identify.

15 Compare your list with this one:
Follow policies and procedures Learn about material, curriculum, standards Practice co-teaching strategies Maintain appropriate teacher- student relationship Dress, speak, act appropriately Serve as role model for students Be punctual, prepared present every day Take initiative Seek constructive criticism Keep information confidential Participate in all PD and school activities suggested CT, US The role and responsibilities for the student teacher are: adhere to school polices & procedures; prepare by becoming familiar with all classroom materials and resources; be knowledge and practice appropriate co-teaching concepts and strategies; develop professional rapport and maintain appropriate teacher-student relationships; behave and be a role model for your students and the sixth; be punctual and prepared for your class. Examples: Arrive 15 minutes before class starts; Review your class materials the evening before so that you are knowledgeable of the content prior to teaching it.

16 Cooperating Teacher Responsibilities
List three key responsibilities for the CT Please pause and take a moment to list the responsibilities you are able to identify.

17 Compare your list with this one:
Model best practices Don’t leave ST alone in classroom Learn about ST Know supervision policies Collaborate with US about ST progress Orient ST to school/classroom policies/procedures Involve ST in standards’ based co-teaching experiences Co-plan, co-implement, co- reflect Provide frequent, written and/or verbal progress reports documenting strength and growth areas Determine growth plan with resources The roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher are: Model best practices in education; student teacher/student teacher shall not have the responsibility for the supervision or instruction of P-12 students without the direct supervision of a certified educator (as per 16 KAR 5:040); become acquainted with the student teacher/student teacher’s background and use this information to provide the best professional guidance and support; know the university/college expectations for supervising a student teacher/student teacher; and the fifth; collaborate with the university supervisor to guide the professional growth of the student teacher. Examples: Do NOT go to the teacher’s lounge and leave the student candidate/student teacher alone to teach a lesson unsupervised; Read the college/university college of education handbook prior to the student candidate starting the student teaching placement. Five points have been identified in this slide as general roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher. The cooperating teacher is a P-12 teacher who supervises the student teacher during their student teaching experience. The five points include: (list 5 points). An example of the roles and responsibilities of the cooperating teacher is to become familiar with the college/universities policies and procedures on supervising a student teacher during their student teaching experience.

18 University Supervisor Responsibilities
List three key responsibilities for the US Please pause and take a moment to list the responsibilities you are able to identify.

19 Compare your list with this one:
Provide ST and CT with program information Lend best practice expertise and perspective Support use of co-teaching strategies Confer with CT and ST frequently to continually assess and guide ST progress Provide leadership and intervention as needed The roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor: Provide program information to cooperating teacher and student teacher/student teacher; provide expertise and a perspective of best practices that is independent of the specific school setting; know and support the use of co-teaching strategies; confer with the cooperating teacher and student teacher/student teacher at regular intervals to assess and discuss the progress and needs of the student teacher; and the fifth; provide leadership and intervention of any issues that arise. Examples: In the beginning of the student teaching experience, set up a meeting time to visit with the cooperating teacher and student teacher to go over the teacher education handbook on student teaching and provide them with copies of the forms that are required to be filled out; Have the cooperating teacher and the student teacher watch the modules on co-teaching together; If a student teacher is coming to school late every day, the cooperating teacher will contact the university supervisor to intervene. represents the college/university during the student teaching experience. Their role is to serve as a liaison between the cooperating teacher and the student teacher as well as evaluate and give feedback to the student teacher. Five general points have been identified for the roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor. They include (list five points). An example of the university supervisor’s roles and responsibilities are to observe and document the student teacher on a regular basis and give feedback to the cooperating teacher and the student teacher for the candidate’s professional growth.

20 Now take a moment to review your university’s handbook
Asbury University Spalding University Bellarmine University Thomas More College Berea College Transylvania University Campbellsville University University of Kentucky Eastern Kentucky University University of Louisville Georgetown College University of Pikeville Kentucky State University University of the Cumberlands Kentucky Wesleyan College Western Kentucky University Lindsey Wilson College Mid-Continent University Midway College Morehead State University Murray State University Northern Kentucky University St. Catharine College Add university links.

21 Policies and Procedures: Review your university handbook
Check out rules, responsibilities, polices and procedures Also, take a look at guidelines for orienting ST

22 Co-Teaching Strategies
Emphasize active engagement of CT and ST in all aspects of instruction from first day Must include planning, teaching, and reflection As indicated earlier, co teaching occurs when two teachers (in this case the cooperating teacher and the student teacher) work together in a classroom with groups of students; sharing the planning, organization, delivery, and assessment of instruction, as well as the physical space. Both teachers are actively involved and engaged in all aspects of instruction. It is not simply dividing the tasks and responsibilities among two people. The purpose of Module II is to discuss and share with you a variety of co-teaching strategies. We will specifically address six strategies. They are listed on the next slide.

23 Part 2

24 Co-Teaching Essentials
Plan together Instruct together Reflect together Use co-teaching strategies Engage CT and ST right away Choose strategy based on goals Picture from:

25 Seven Co-Teaching Strategies
One Teach; One Observe One Teach; One Assist Station Teaching Supplemental Teacher Parallel Teaching Alternative Teaching Team Teaching As indicated earlier, co teaching occurs when two teachers (in this case the cooperating teacher and the student teacher) work together in a classroom with groups of students; sharing the planning, organization, delivery, and assessment of instruction, as well as the physical space. Both teachers are actively involved and engaged in all aspects of instruction. It is not simply dividing the tasks and responsibilities among two people. The purpose of Module II is to discuss and share with you a variety of co-teaching strategies. We will specifically address six strategies.We will address each one as it applies to a co teaching situation with a cooperating teacher and student teacher. Each of these will address three specific pieces of information 1) how it is defined in our Kentucky model; 2) some specific examples of how it can be used in a classroom; and 3) Some pros and cons regarding the strategy and some characteristics used to describe it; There is no hierarchy to these strategies. They lend themselves to a variety of applications. Likewise, there is no specific amount of time each one should be utilized. The strategy utilized can variety within each lesson and multiple strategies can easily be applied. Thus, the Need for planning together. Co-teaching is effective for students with a variety of instructional needs, including English language learners, special needs, as well as the range of abilities from low to high.

26 One Teach; One Observe Definition
Co-teachers decide together: Who observes, who teaches Purpose of observation Method of collecting data Analyze observational data One Teach; One Observe Definition Picture from: The first of the 7 co-teaching strategies is “One Teach – One Observe.” Again, the 7 co-teaching strategies are not designed to be hierarchical, or performed in a specific order. However, the “one teach – one observe” co-teaching strategy is useful to introduce early in the Clinical Practice semester because the student teacher (ST) is becoming acquainted with the Cooperating Teacher’s (CT) classroom contextual factors, routines, and interpersonal relationships. When using this strategy, one teacher (either the ST or CT) has primary responsibility for instruction while the other observes and records information about students or instruction. The strategy is intended for the ST and CT to take turns in the observational role in order to develop a close awareness of the instructional and classroom dynamics. Importantly, the key to “One Teach / One Observe” is to have a focus for the observation. This focus is jointly decided upon prior to instruction. Prior to an observation, the co-teachers discuss and agree on a system for recording observational data. The method they choose may be in the form of a checklist, a seating chart to record teacher – to - student and student - to - student discourse, or simply anecdotal notes. The co-teachers discuss the observation and its data during a post – observation conference and use this information to plan instruction and behavior management. The “One Teach / One Observe” co – teaching strategy is simple enough to use, but its impact may be limited if an observation focus and the system for recording observational data is neglected. To isolate the focus for the co-teacher’s observation, it is strongly recommended that the co-teachers examine the Kentucky Teacher Standards to serve as the benchmark for performance. Following the observation, the standards should be re-visited in a way that encourages growth and self - reflection. If you were to observe this in the classroom, you would find one teacher in the from (usually) directing the instruction to the group. The other teacher (CP or ST) will be located in the room so as to not interrupt instruction, but also strategically, so whatever is to be observed can be viewed for data collection. This is a visual to represent this concept.

27 One Teach; One Observe Application
Instructional strategy: Higher – order questioning (KTS 4.5) ST observes CT use higher-order questioning and question sequencing ST records questions levels, students’ voluntary and non-voluntary responses, and frequency of individual responses ST and CT conduct post-observation analysis: discuss pacing, questions, and student responses The “One Teach / One Observe” co-teaching strategy is useful for acquainting your ST with your classroom contextual factors, routines, and interpersonal relationships between you and the students and between students. Similarly, the strategy is useful for a CT when observing his/ her ST because the CT is viewing the classroom dynamics as a non – participant. This non – participant perspective allows the CT to see strengths and weaknesses in her students, areas for growth in her ST, and provides her new ideas for her own teaching. Again, the KY Teacher Standards are useful benchmarks for determining what aspects of instruction or behavior management the co-teacher wishes to observe. This slide provides the example of “higher – order questioning” which corresponds to KTS Other possible instructional strategies and behaviors the co-teachers may choose to observe include: cooperative learning and differentiated instruction; how well students respond to verbal and written directions; managing resources and technology during instruction; students’ time on – task and off – task; teacher’s use of transitions / connecting ideas and activities meaningfully for students; teacher’s use of praise, encouragement, clarification, re-phrasing, and elaborating.

28 One Teach; One Observe Benefits and Cautions
Now take a moment to record some of the benefits (B) and cautions (C) of this strategy B C Please pause and take a moment to list the benefits and cautions you are able to identify.

29 One Teach; One Observe Benefits and Cautions
Helps the ST become familiar with all students’ ability levels, social skills, interests, behaviors etc. Observing teacher can see behavior and other variables not seen by teacher conducting lesson ST and CT learn/sharpen new skills (reciprocal learning) Can be short intervals ST and CT must set aside time for reflection and analysis CT may de-value its importance in favor of other co-teaching strategies in which ST May be over-used in settings where CT is reluctant to “let go” The “One Teach / One Observe” co-teaching strategy is neither difficult nor time-consuming to use. It is an effective strategy to acclimate a ST into the Clinical Practice setting while at the same time providing a CT opportunity to observe his / her own classroom’s nuances that may be overlooked. If used conscientiously and the roles of teacher and observer are routinely reversed, the co-teachers will really see what is going on in the classroom and will sharpen their teaching skills simultaneously. This strategy, however, can be misused and a few notes for preventing its misuse are warranted. First, this strategy only works when both co-teachers are equal partners in the planning, teaching, and reflecting process. Following an observation that either co-teacher conducts, it is imperative that the post – observation conference occur. Improved student achievement is based on constructive and mindful reflection; failure to conduct the post-observation conference stifles both teachers’ professional growth and ultimately the achievement of their students. Second, observing others and critiquing / reflecting upon their teaching is analogous to a musician listening intently to his peer and critiquing / reflecting upon his performance. In both cases, the co-teacher and the musician are observing and noticing the nuances of their art; thinking about ways to perfect their art for the benefit of their students and the enjoyment of their listeners. Observation with a purpose, as “One Teach / One Observe” entails, is equally as strong in its impact as the next strategies you will learn. It is therefore important not to dismiss the potential of this strategy and its impact on professional growth and student achievement. Third, Clinical Practice can be a delicate time in the life of a ST and CT, with the latter having the upper – hand. Careful consideration needs to be made when placing STs with CTs to ensure that personalities match, or least will not become oppositional. Thus, the “One Teach / One Observe” strategy can be overused in cases where the CT is unwilling or uncertain of “letting go” of his / her class to a ST. Recognizing this trait in oneself is an important step in growing professionally as an educator; learning to share equally in the teaching responsibilities is an expectation of the co-teaching model.

30 One Teach; One Assist Definition
Two teachers present One leads instruction Other teacher moves about room offering individual support for students as needed Note: Roles should be reversed OFTEN Picture from This is an extension of one teach, one observe. One teacher has the primary instructional responsibility while the other assists students’ with their work through encouragement, cueing, and other means, monitors behavior, or corrects assignments.

31 One Teach; One Assist Picture from This represents a visual of the model. The assist teacher is at the side, constantly monitoring each student for understanding, providing assistance to specific individuals, checking work and progress, and cueing or encouraging students. Remember the person either the student teacher (ST) or the Cooperating Teacher (CT) will be positioned with whomever they are assisting. The person would usually move around the room throughout the classroom instruction. The person who is assisting will be careful to not interrupt instruction or be disturbing the participation of any student.

32 One Teach; One Assist Application
Use One Teach; One Assist When student work needs close monitoring Examples: How well do our students understand the steps in long division? Are all students following along as they learn to take notes? When one teacher has a particular expertise Example: I’ve never taught this content with this teacher before and I need to get a feel for the flow of the class. Teachers using co-teaching for the first time usually want to know when to use the model. This will be totally dependent upon the pre-planning, the students in the classroom, the content of the lesson, the skills of the students, and the lesson outcome desired. However, the suggestions on this slide provide some direction for use of One Teach: One Assist in terms of guidance. For instance, if a lesson is being introduced, it is important to have interactions with students to see what they know or don’t knot. Likewise, in lessons that have deep concepts, it is great to check to see what individual students know. It is great for monitoring the note taking of students—to see what they are capturing and to provide some guidance for them. It is also good, if one teacher (ST or CT) has a particular expertise for the lesson and the other wants to listen and provide assistance to students in terms of grasping the concept. This can also be used to foster student participation in discussion; to check re-teaching, drill and practice, or test review.

33 One Teach; One Assist Benefits and Cautions
Now take a moment to record some of the benefits (B) and cautions (C) of this strategy B C Please pause and take a moment to list the benefits and cautions you are able to identify.

34 One Teach; One Assist Benefits and Cautions
Fosters individual student support Lacks parity As with all strategies there are strengths to the strategy and cautions. A strength with this strategy Is that students receive individual support during the lesson. This same occurs for individual feedback on note taking, or interaction, and student participation in the lesson. A caution in the use would be to not over-use this method as it does not provide for parity among the student teacher and the cooperating teacher.

35 Station Teaching Definition
Teachers divide content; each plans and teaches a part Class divided into teaching centers Each teacher at a station; other stations can run independently This approach is where the co-teaching pair divide the instructional content into parts. Each teacher instructs one of the groups. Groups rotate or spend a designated amount of time at each station. An independent station can be utilized along with teacher led stations. The independent station has materials for each student at their “independent” functioning level. This requires a very diverse station with multiple levels and types of materials. Many teachers utilize technology to accomplish this. Great blog for Station Teaching:

36 Station Teaching Picture from: Visual.

37 Station Teaching Application
Can use when: Content is complex but not hierarchical Lesson involves review or addresses several topics There are many times that station teaching can be utilized. One time is when the content is complex but not hierarchical. Another time is in lessons in which part of planned instruction is review. A third time is when several topics comprise the instruction. It is important to utilize Co-Planning before the lesson (Use Planning sheet) Be sure to include Post-instruction debriefing on station teaching. This is a great PDF with examples and pictures of all of the co-teaching strategies.

38 Station Teaching Example
For example: One teacher guides a reading group. Other teacher leads a writing activity. Independent stations might include: independent reading, writing, partner reading. There are many examples of how to use station teaching, like the ones on the PPT (share these by rephrasing). Youtube: Examples of co-teaching: Another ES Youtube example of co-teaching: MS example of co-teaching:

39 Station Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Now take a moment to record some of the benefits (B) and cautions (C) of this strategy C Please pause and take a moment to list the benefits and cautions you are able to identify.

40 Station Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Clear teaching roles Students work in groups More material in less time Fewer discipline problems Place students strategically C Lots of preplanning Material organized High noise level Stations end at same time Some groups work alone Some advantages of this approach are: * Each teacher has a clear teaching responsibility. * Students have the benefit of working in small groups. * Teachers can cover more material in a shorter period of time. * Fewer discipline problems occur because students are engaged in active, hands-on learning. It is possible to separate students who need to work away from each other. Some cautions of this approach are: * To work effectively, this approach requires a lot of preplanning. * All materials must be prepared and organized in advance. * The noise level will be at a maximum. * All stations must be paced so teaching ends at the same time. One or more groups must work independently of the teacher. YouTube Videos with examples: 7th grade writing stations Examples of co-teaching- good examples.

41 Parallel Teaching Definition
CT and ST instruct half class Teachers address same content Use same materials and strategies In this type of co-teaching, the teachers jointly plan the instruction, but each delivers it to a heterogeneous group comprised of half the students in the class. The teachers do not exchange groups. This approach requires both that the teachers coordinate their efforts so that all students receive essentially the same instruction and that grouping decisions are based on maintaining diversity within each group.

42 Parallel Teaching Picture from: This is a visual of what parallel teaching might look like in the classroom.

43 Parallel Teaching Example
Consider parallel teaching if: A lower adult-student ratio is needed to improve instructional efficiency There is a desire to foster student participation in discussion Activities such as drill and practice, re- teaching, and test review are considered The primary purpose of parallel teaching is to lower the teacher-student ratio. Parallel teaching is often used drill-and-practice activities, test reviews, topics needing a high level of student discussion, or projects needing close teacher supervision.

44 Parallel Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Now take a moment to record some of the benefits (B) and cautions (C) of this strategy B C Please pause and take a moment to list the benefits and cautions you are able to identify.

45 Parallel Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Lowers student-to-teacher ratio Promotes student/teacher interaction Allows teachers to more closely monitor students Helpful warm-up to ST “solo” C Requires lots of planning and skill so both groups get same instruction High noise level Needs similar pacing Parallel teaching is often used drill-and-practice activities, test reviews, topics needing a high level of student discussion, or projects needing close teacher supervision. It enables all students to participate more in instructional conversations and gives especially shy students a smaller audience. Parallel teaching could also be used to orient students to a particular viewpoint—each teacher presenting a different viewpoint to the half of the class they are teaching—and then bring the class together for the larger discussion with both views being represented. Parallel teaching also facilitates tiering of instruction; that is, teaching all students the same core concepts, but differentiating practice. This is common when using parallel teaching as a part of response to intervention. Definitely consider parallel teaching if: A lower adult-student ratio is needed to improve instructional efficiency There is a desire to foster student participation in discussion When activities such as drill and practice, re-teaching, and test review are considered. Like all strategies there are strengths and cautions. STRENGTHS include: It provides two smaller groups so there is a lower student-to-teacher ratio It increases interaction between students and teachers It allows a teacher to work closely and monitor indivdiual students. Cautions include: It requires co-planning in order that both groups receive same instruction at approximately the same pace. It can be noisy with two groups and can prove distracting if each group paces differently.

46 Supplemental Teaching

47 Supplemental Teaching Definition
Both teachers teach CCC Address same curriculum goals at same time Use same method One teacher teaches at brisk pace Other teacher provides additional time and information for students based on need This strategy may be utilized as an effective way for students working on grade level and students needing additional time to master targeted content and skills. Using this strategy, teachers provide remediation as needed to help all students succeed. While utilizing the same curricular goals and the same basic methodology, the co-teacher offers differentiated instruction in terms pacing and the amount of information provided during the lesson.

48 Supplemental Teaching Application
Useful for students working on grade level and those needing additional instruction time May be appropriate when students lack requisite experiences or background knowledge May be used in RTI process Requires understanding of student strengths and needs The key to understanding this strategy is keeping in mind that both the teacher and co-teacher intend to cover the same academic content in any given lesson. The main difference lies in pacing. Often, students that have difficulty grasping the content of a given lesson could succeed if they simply progressed through the material at a slower pace or were provided additional information or examples. Once teachers have gained an understanding of the learner characteristics in the classroom, they may decide that some students might profit from such instruction. In view of this, supplemental teaching might be appropriate for RTI.

49 Supplemental Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Now take a moment to record some of the benefits (B) and cautions (C) of this strategy B C Please pause and take a moment to list the benefits and cautions you are able to identify.

50 Supplemental Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Teachers focus planning on CCC Allows for flexible grouping Noise level may distract some children The pros of this strategy include the use of common lesson objectives and flexible grouping. One problem might be the noise level. Some students might find it difficult to focus on one teacher while the co-teacher is covering the same basic content at a different pace.

51 Alternative Teaching Definition
Student teacher uses one method Cooperating teacher uses different method Both teachers teach same information

52 Alternative (Differentiated) Teaching
Left picture from: Right picture from:

53 Alternative Teaching Application
Use: Sparingly to avoid perception of special needs “pull out” for “select” group of students When student mastery of concepts taught or about to be taught vary greatly When mastery expected for all students When enrichment is goal When some students work on a parallel curriculum There are some considerations to consider on when this model can be best utilized. Some guidelines include: When students must master the concepts taught or from a pre-assessment data, the concepts to be taught vary greatly. When high levels of mastery are expected for each student in the classroom When enrichment is desired for students. This particularly can be helpful if pre-assessment indicates a student already knows the concept while the rest of the class does not. When some students are utilizing the alternative or parallel curriculum approach---this would be useful with special needs or ELL students.

54 Alternative Teaching For example
When teaching content classification of plants: ST uses a document camera CT uses manipulatives Large group completes project; small one is assessed Large group checks homework; small one prepares for next lesson These are some examples of how differentiated teaching could be utilized in the classroom. GO OVER THE SLIDE. What others can you add?

55 Alternative Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Now take a moment to record some of the benefits (B) and cautions (C) of this strategy B C Please pause and take a moment to list the benefits and cautions you are able to identify.

56 Alternative Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Useful for pre-teaching, re-teaching, acceleration, enrichment, makeup work All students work in groups that are smaller than the full class size to avoid the perception of special needs "pull out" for select group of students Can be stigmatizing if the small group always consists of the students with disabilities Can diminish authority if one teacher always works with the smaller group There are some good points to alternate teaching including: It is great for pre-teaching a concept, re-teaching a concept, acceleration of concepts, enrichment or makeup work. It is good if all students work in a small group at some point so that there is small group learning offered and it avoid a “pull out” for certain groups of students. Cautions for this approach include: If the same group is pulled out for small group over and over, it could be stigmatizing as “low students” or “students with disabilities” or some other label. It can diminish the authority of one teacher if that teacher is the one who always works with the small group.

57 Team Teaching Definition
ST and CT share instruction in a way that the leader is not clearly defined student teacher and cooperating teacher both are teaching in the class together, both fully engaged in leading the delivery of core instruction at the same time. student teacher and cooperating teacher simultaneously provide instruction with both teachers sharing responsibility for student achievement. The student teacher and the cooperating teacher share responsibilities for all students; planning, teaching, assessing the progress of the students. The two teachers (student teacher and cooperating teacher) may have different but equally active roles; one leading in the large-group lesson while the other models note-taking or restates key concepts for clarification. Team teaching allows for more interaction between students and the two teachers in the classroom Research supports higher student achievement when team teaching is incorporated into instruction.

58 Team Teaching Application
For example when instructing together: Teaching length and width with real-life application ST leads with story about asking landlord to build a pool in back of apartment. Situation: if the pool was built, the tenant would put the tile around the edge. Pool area of 36 square feet CT begins with questions, "If the pool has an area of 36 square feet, what are the possible dimensions of the pool?" ST writes student responses (guesses) on board CT discusses explanation of distributive property, order of operations, associative and commutative properties etc. CT assigns students to groups and lesson continues Before instruction: the cooperating teacher and the student teacher need to define what team teaching will look like before lesson implementation. the cooperating teacher and student teacher develop a plan for delivering instruction, and clarify how management and materials will be handled.

59 Team Teaching When reflecting together:
ST and CT reflect about strengths, concerns of lesson and next steps The final step is reflection. student teacher and cooperating teacher reflect and make meaningful decisions about lesson taught and next steps. Analysis, critical thinking, and application of the lesson is important in determining next steps. Additional comments: There is no defined teacher – both share, assist, and deliver instruction. Team teaching: Requires trust, mutual respect, clear communication, and time for planning. NOTE: Be aware of too much teacher talk, repetition and lack of student interaction It is not “tag” teaching.

60 Team Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Now take a moment to record some of the benefits (B) and cautions (C) of this strategy B C Please pause and take a moment to list the benefits and cautions you are able to identify.

61 Team Teaching Benefits and Cautions
Models respectful, adult working relationship Allows both teachers to provide perspective Can allow teaching two strategies simultaneously Promotes respect for both teachers Involves meticulous, co- planning Requires care developing rapport Often time consuming There are some good points to alternate teaching including: It is great for pre-teaching a concept, re-teaching a concept, acceleration of concepts, enrichment or makeup work. It is good if all students work in a small group at some point so that there is small group learning offered and it avoid a “pull out” for certain groups of students. Cautions for this approach include: If the same group is pulled out for small group over and over, it could be stigmatizing as “low students” or “students with disabilities” or some other label. It can diminish the authority of one teacher if that teacher is the one who always works with the small group.

62 Noteworthy Points Use co-teaching with all ST, e.g., Promote ST Growth
Special Education, ELL, Gifted Alternative Certification International student teachers Promote ST Growth Co Teaching is especially meaningful when working with diverse learners. The models of co-teaching created by Marilyn Friend utilized some of the same terms but vary from these strategies for use with a student teacher. This will be particularly meaningful when working with all types of teachers. Although these seven strategies have no hierarchy order or certain amount of time to use, there does seem to be a meaningful way this could be utilized with student teachers in terms of developing their skills. First utilization of One Teach, One Observe allows the student teacher to observe specific types of teaching, students, and behaviors. This provides the student teacher some meaningful information on which to build his/her skills. Second, it is good to provide the student teacher time to One Teach, One Assist. Again, this eases the candidate into working with multiple students, observing and listening to the Mentor teacher provide the lessons. Team Teaching is suggested next so the student teacher is teaching at the same time as the cooperating teacher…this allows both to observe each other so the ST is learning from the CT and the CT is observing the ST in order to provide feedback. Supplemental Teaching is the next suggested strategy to provide the student teacher another type of experience. Parallel Teaching is suggested next in order for the student teacher to teach the exact same material as the cooperating teacher, but with just half the class. Alternative Teaching is suggested as the next strategy so the student teacher is provided an opportunity to work with a small group of students focused on specific needs (remedial, special, enrichment, advanced) AND/OR work with a large group while the Cooperating Teacher works with a smaller group. Station Teaching is another strategy for the TC to build skills in not only developing the teaching of one station, but to assist in planning and monitoring a third station. All of these models allow for development of teaching skills in order to meet the needs of all students for the ST. Again, we want to emphasize there is NO HIERARCHY to the teaching strategies….these suggestions just assist you in thinking how to introduce some of the strategies so the ST can have meaningful development.

63 Part 3 Co Teaching is especially meaningful when working with diverse learners. The models of co-teaching created by Marilyn Friend utilized some of the same terms but vary from these strategies for use with a student teacher. This will be particularly meaningful when working with all types of teachers. Although these seven strategies have no hierarchy order or certain amount of time to use, there does seem to be a meaningful way this could be utilized with student teachers in terms of developing their skills. First utilization of One Teach, One Observe allows the student teacher to observe specific types of teaching, students, and behaviors. This provides the student teacher some meaningful information on which to build his/her skills. Second, it is good to provide the student teacher time to One Teach, One Assist. Again, this eases the candidate into working with multiple students, observing and listening to the Mentor teacher provide the lessons. Team Teaching is suggested next so the student teacher is teaching at the same time as the cooperating teacher…this allows both to observe each other so the ST is learning from the CT and the CT is observing the ST in order to provide feedback. Supplemental Teaching is the next suggested strategy to provide the student teacher another type of experience. Parallel Teaching is suggested next in order for the student teacher to teach the exact same material as the cooperating teacher, but with just half the class. Alternative Teaching is suggested as the next strategy so the student teacher is provided an opportunity to work with a small group of students focused on specific needs (remedial, special, enrichment, advanced) AND/OR work with a large group while the Cooperating Teacher works with a smaller group. Station Teaching is another strategy for the TC to build skills in not only developing the teaching of one station, but to assist in planning and monitoring a third station. All of these models allow for development of teaching skills in order to meet the needs of all students for the ST. Again, we want to emphasize there is NO HIERARCHY to the teaching strategies….these suggestions just assist you in thinking how to introduce some of the strategies so the ST can have meaningful development.

64 Remember Connect co-teaching to KTS, KTIP, CCC
Choose strategies based on student needs Incorporate RTI Co-planning and co-reflection are critical No hierarchy in co-teaching strategies Strategies facilitate meaningful ST experience, promote student learning There is a handout located on the website. This handout is designed for the Cooperating Teacher and student teacher to see how the building of teacher standards occurs along with the Co-Teaching Strategies. Strategies must be chosen based on student needs. They can be an excellent way to keep data and document for RtI. It is critical to not just implement co-teaching, but rather to concentrate on co-planning prior to the lesson and also the co-reflection after the lesson is complete. Both of these contribute highly to the growth and understanding of data use for the ST. There is no specific amount of times to use any one strategy or any requirement on how many times to use the strategies. These should become a natural way of teaching in order to meet student needs.

65 Co-Planning, Co-Teaching, Co-Reflection
What? When? Where? How? Why? This would be the introduction slide to the last section of Module II. The focus of this section is on co-planning aspects and impact of co-teaching as well as what happens after the actual co-teaching experience with co-reflection (which includes analysis of student work). Go over the set up of the What,,When, Where, How, and Why

66 Why Co-Plan? How (when, where) will you co-plan?
To design effective instruction (short-term, long-term) To focus on student learning How (when, where) will you co-plan? Good planning brings about good teaching. Talk about the difference between being a proactive teacher and a reactive teacher in light of planning.

67 Why Co-Teach? To foster student learning
To promote professional growth Just do a quick review of the 7 strategies. This is the filter for the co-planning ideas that were just covered as well as the next section on co-reflection. Good planning brings about good teaching. Talk about the difference between being a proactive teacher and a reactive teacher in light of planning.

68 Why Co-Reflect? How will you co-reflect with your ST?
To carefully analyze student data To consider next steps in instruction To be proactive, not reactive How will you co-reflect with your ST? It is important to emphasize the importance of co-reflection. It may be the first to go, but it a critical link in the success of co-teaching and student learning.

69 When Co-Planning & Co-Reflecting, Consider:
Next steps for co-planning and co-reflection Barriers and bridges to co-teaching Your role in success of co-teaching This slide can be closure piece for the training as well as a launch-pad to the world of co-teaching in the state of KY. Take each bullet and allow time for the group to talk and share ideas on their plan to implement co-teaching in their classroom.

70 Part 4 This slide can be closure piece for the training as well as a launch-pad to the world of co-teaching in the state of KY. Take each bullet and allow time for the group to talk and share ideas on their plan to implement co-teaching in their classroom.

71 Why Connect KTS, KTIP & Co-Teaching?
Example Why Connect KTS, KTIP & Co-Teaching? 16 KAR 5:040 Section 6(6) (6) The educator preparation program shall use the Kentucky Teacher Internship Program Teacher Performance Assessment tasks established in 16 KAR 7:010, Section 2, or a variation of these tasks to meet the requirement specified in subsection (5) of this section.

72 Now take a moment to review the standards
Click here to access the standards

73 How does co-teaching fit with these standards?

74 KTS 8: Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others
For example KTS 8: Collaborates with Colleagues/Parents/Others KTS 10: Provides Leadership School/Community/Profession The roles and responsibilities section of Module II integrates the Kentucky Teacher Standards (KTS) with the Kentucky Teacher Internship Program (KTIP) and Co-Teaching. KTS Eight identifies collaboration with colleagues/parents/others. The role of the cooperating teacher, university supervisor and student teacher are to collaborate in planning activities that will enhance student learning and evaluate the outcomes of the collaboration efforts. The Kentucky Teacher Standards (KTS) are integrated into many of the models presented. For instance, KTS 1: Demonstrates Applied Criteria would be included in all models, but would be visible in station teaching, team teaching, parallel teaching, supplemental teaching, and alternative teaching. KTS#3 would be included in all the models as the environment of all would include high expectations, be positive, value and support diversity and address individual needs and foster respect between both teachers and the students. KTS#4 would be obvious as the models are selected based upon the needs of the student, assessment data, and would actively engage the students. Specific models that enhance HOT would be the supplemental teaching, one teach-one assist, alternative teaching, and station teaching. KTS #5 is necessary in all the models as they are based upon data. Some that lend themselves easier to this would be the station teaching (one could have an assessment station), as well as the teach-observe (keeping data), and the supplemental or alternative teaching models. The communication between teachers and students and parents as well as the use of formative assessments should be included in all the models. KTS #6: the use of technology can easily be incorporated into the station teaching, the alternative or supplemental teaching, as well as one teach-one assist. The idea of using the technology should be planned in any of the models so it is used effectively. The Flipped Classroom model could easily become a station to assist both teachers in providing additional instruction or pre-instruction to students. KTS #8: Obviously, use of any of the models requires the student teacher and the Cooperative Teacher to collaborate and plan (see the section on co-planning). All of the components of collaboration can easily be displayed in use of co-teaching models. KTS Ten provides leadership within school/community/profession. The roles and responsibilities of the university supervisor and the cooperating teacher are to identify leadership opportunities for the student teacher that provide professional growth, activities and evaluation of leadership efforts that will enhance student learning.

75 Why Connect KTS, KTIP & Co-Teaching
Example Why Connect KTS, KTIP & Co-Teaching Now, look at KTS 5 (Student Assessment) Why is this standard important? How would you use this in co-teaching?

76 Why is this standard important?
Example Why is this standard important?

77 Framework for measuring learning
Example Framework for measuring learning

78 How would you use this in co-teaching?
Example How would you use this in co-teaching?

79 Example Through co-reflection To plan meaningful assessments To reflect about results (see KTIP Task C)

80 Now review KTS 5 Indicators

81 KTS 5: Indicators 5.1 Uses pre-assessments
5.2 Uses formative assessments 5.3 Uses summative assessments 5.4 Describes, analyzes, evaluates student performance data 5.5 Communicates results to students & parents 5.6 Allows for student self-assessment

82 Look at KTS 5.2 (Formative)

83 Why would you choose this indicator?

84 Provides good information about individual student learning needs

85 How would you use KTS 5.2 in co- teaching?

86 Together: Design assessments Analyze assessment data Determine next steps

87 Take another look at the KTS
Click here to access the KTS Choose a standard Why did you choose this standard? How would you use this standard in co-teaching? Look at the indicators Which indicator(s) would you address? How would you address this/these indicator(s)? The Kentucky Teacher Standards (KTS) are integrated into many of the models presented. For instance, KTS 1: Demonstrates Applied Criteria would be included in all models, but would be visible in station teaching, team teaching, parallel teaching, supplemental teaching, and alternative teaching. KTS#3 would be included in all the models as the environment of all would include high expectations, be positive, value and support diversity and address individual needs and foster respect between both teachers and the students. KTS#4 would be obvious as the models are selected based upon the needs of the student, assessment data, and would actively engage the students. Specific models that enhance HOT would be the supplemental teaching, one teach-one assist, alternative teaching, and station teaching. KTS #5 is necessary in all the models as they are based upon data. Some that lend themselves easier to this would be the station teaching (one could have an assessment station), as well as the teach-observe (keeping data), and the supplemental or alternative teaching models. The communication between teachers and students and parents as well as the use of formative assessments should be included in all the models. KTS #6: the use of technology can easily be incorporated into the station teaching, the alternative or supplemental teaching, as well as one teach-one assist. The idea of using the technology should be planned in any of the models so it is used effectively. The Flipped Classroom model could easily become a station to assist both teachers in providing additional instruction or pre-instruction to students. KTS #8: Obviously, use of any of the models requires the student teacher and the Cooperative Teacher to collaborate and plan (see the section on co-planning). All of the components of collaboration can easily be displayed in use of co-teaching models.

88 Observation Strategies
Name two strategies for collecting observational data

89 Compare your strategies to these:
Scripting Seating Charts KTIP IPR

90 Co-Reflection Strategies
Name two strategies for reflecting together

91 Compare your strategies to these:
Focus on critical data Clarify ambiguous points Discuss most and least effective instructional strategies Determine next steps Consider growth areas for ST (PGP)

92 Together US and CT consider:
Course syllabus (map of experience) Performance assessment instruments and procedures Professional Growth Plan How to address concerns as needed

93 When Supervising, Remember
KTS structures supervision KTIP is core performance assessment CCC heart of co-teaching and career and college readiness Click here to access: KTIP IPR Common Core Standards

94 Links to Training Resources
Instructions for completing 16 KAR 5:040 Part A: Click here to access the instructions The following are resources to use when you are working together: Handout Link: Online PowerPoint Video Links: School-Based Co-Teaching: https://vimeo.com/ University-Based Co-Teaching: https://vimeo.com/ Supplemental Teaching Secondary: Elementary_2_0001.wmv Station Teaching: stations A handout is provided for the Kentucky Teacher Standards and the sections of the training module. It would be helpful for the viewers to have this in front of them as the information is presented. Also, videos of each teaching model of co-teaching are provided. Some are provided in all three levels (elementary, middle and high), while some are provided in only one. There is also a video to catch a glimpse of how these models can be utilized within the college teaching programs.

95 Completion of 16 KAR 5:040 Section 2 (5,a) and 5 (6,b) for Cooperating Teachers
For CTs: Go to Create or log in to your account Enter the group code 9nj1a8 to join the CT group The assessment will be available under the latest posts of the CT group The bibliography contains resources that discuss roles and responsibilities on co-teaching. For further information on individual college/university student teaching requirements, please review your teacher education handbook at your college or university.

96 Completion of 16 KAR 5:040 Section 2 (5,a) and 5 (6,b) for University Supervisors
For USs: Go to Create or log in to your account Enter the group code 89hq3o to join the US group The assessment will be available under the latest posts of the US group The bibliography contains resources that discuss roles and responsibilities on co-teaching. For further information on individual college/university student teaching requirements, please review your teacher education handbook at your college or university.

97 References Darragh, J. J., et al. (2011). "When Teachers Collaborate, Good Things Happen: Teacher Candidate Perspectives of the Co-Teach Model for the Student Teaching Internship." AILACTE Journal 8: Friend, M. , & Cook, L. (2013). Interactions: Collaboration Skills for School Professionals. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education Inc. Larkin, D.B. (2013). “10 Things to Know About Mentoring Student Teachers.” Kappan 94 (7), Teacher Quality Enhancement Center, College of Education, St. Cloud State University. (2010). Mentoring Teacher Candidates Through Co-Teaching Collaboration that Makes a Difference. St. Cloud, Minnesota. The bibliography contains resources that discuss roles and responsibilities on co-teaching. For further information on individual college/university student teaching requirements, please review your teacher education handbook at your college or university.

98 Resources for Supervisors to Support and Assess Student Teachers
Are there references or resources that you might contribute?

99 Completion of evaluation survey 16 KAR 5:040 Section 2 (5,b) and Section 5 (6,b) REQUIRED
For CT and US, go to: Thanks for participating! Note: Feedback required to receive participation certificate.

100 Certificate will be sent after survey is completed

101 Thanks for participating!

102 Thanks to Technical Coordinators
Amanda Goodwin, University of Kentucky Martin Mills, University of Kentucky Manish Sharma, Thomas More College


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