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Co-Teaching Models Source: Friend & Cook (2000). Interactions.

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Presentation on theme: "Co-Teaching Models Source: Friend & Cook (2000). Interactions."— Presentation transcript:

1 Co-Teaching Models Source: Friend & Cook (2000). Interactions

2 Objectives zDefine co-teaching zDescribe the rationale for using co- teaching zIdentify six approaches to co-teaching and provide examples of each

3 Co-teaching Rationale zMeets the individual needs of students zGoal is to provide individualized instruction (less fragmented and more contextualized) in a general education environment zReduce stigma attached by pull-out programs zProvide opportunities for flexible scheduling zCreates positive social interactions zCo-teachers have a sense of collegial support

4 Characteristics of Co-teaching zTwo or more professionals (Peers with shared teaching responsibility) zJointly delivering instruction (General education provides the instructional framework, yet the curriculum may be modified for students with disabilities or others who need accommodations) zDiverse group of students (Allows for teachers to respond to the diverse range of needs of their students, lowers student/teacher ratio and expands professional expertise) zShared classroom space (Co-teachers teach in a single classroom)

5 Co-teaching Approaches zOne Teaching~One Observing zOne Teaching~One Drifting zStation Teaching zParallel Teaching zAlternative Teaching zTeam Teaching

6 One Teaching/One Observing +Requires little joint planning time +Provides opportunity for ESE teachers to learn about General Education Curriculum +Particularly effective for teachers new to collaboration -Can result in special educator as being relegated to role of an assistant

7 One Teaching/One Drifting +Requires little joint planning time +Provides opportunity for ESE teachers to learn about General Education Curriculum +Particularly effective for teachers new to collaboration -Can result in special educator as being relegated to role of an assistant -The second teacher can sometimes be a distraction -Students can become dependent on the “drifter”

8 Station Teaching +Each professional has separate responsibility for delivering instruction +Lower teacher:student ratio +Students with disabilities can be more easily integrated into small groups -Noise level can be distracting -Movement can be distracting

9 Parallel Teaching +Lower teacher:student ratio +Heterogeneous grouping +Allows for more creativity in lesson delivery -Teachers must both be comfortable in content and confident in teaching the content -Should not be used for initial instruction

10 Alternative Teaching + Helps with attention problem students +Allows for re-teaching, tutoring, or enrichment -Can be stigmatizing to group who is alternatively taught -ESE teacher can be viewed as an assistant if he/she is always in alternative teaching role

11 Team Teaching +Greatest amount of shared responsibility +Allows for creativity in lesson delivery +Prompts teachers to try innovative techniques neither professional would have tried alone -Requires greatest amount of trust and commitment -Most difficult to implement

12 School-wide Factors that Influence Co-teaching zAdministrative Support zESE Caseload zVoluntary vs. Involuntary Participation zScheduling (For teaching and planning) zProblem-solving techniques


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